Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

'Furness 'super-school' excludes 380 pupils' in its first year. watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by M_E_X)
    Hmm, that kind of ruins the test - if the school is selective we can't really get a fair gauge of how effective this sort of schooling is. Fact is though, in the first year it did absolutely disastrously.

    I suspect that student intake at the school will fall sharply: poor results combined with overbearing rules, I would not go there nor send my children there.
    In the case of Furness Academy there is very little choice. One of the remaining schools is quite far away for many pupils, and the other two state schools in the area have always been oversubscribed. There is a private school as well, but I doubt most people would be able to pay for it.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by M_E_X)
    I suspect that student intake at the school will fall sharply: poor results combined with overbearing rules, I would not go there nor send my children there.
    The school in the OP? I don't think the intake will suffer. It's by far the biggest school in a small town which lacks a great selection of secondary schools. There's a popular Catholic school which I went to but it's oversubscribed every year, and people that don't satisfy its requirements will be allocated to the academy. There are a few other choices but they're further away from the town centre, so if people don't fall into the catchment area for those then, again, they're likely to have to go to the academy.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by LazyWorseThanInfidel)
    did you know that schools in britain used to be good in the early 20th century and mid 20th? now they are a fricking mess. thanks to this nicey nicey crap. first they stopped the cain. now schools even have no shouting policies thanks to this junk research into how to educate kids best. its not even the schools fault, its the unemployed parents who do not bring up their kids with discipline. private schools are good because the kids are brought up well.
    There's no doubt that a lot of the kids get no discipline from home, but that doesn't mean that the discipline they receive in school needs to be so suffocating. The cane is an archaic form of punishment that didn't really work on the most disruptive pupils anyway. It just caused resentment, as these rules have done. It's not 'nicey nicey crap' all the time. Did you see the programme on BBC recently about a group of year 5 and 6 boy pupils in an Essex primary school? They were seriously behind in reading, so the school brought in Gareth Malone who gave the kids lots of exciting things to do and made an outdoor classroom in return for harder work from them in the future. In 8 weeks one of the boys reading age went up by 20 months, and many by more than 5 months.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by rainbow drops)
    Cumbrians on TSR are usually from nice Cumbria and not horrible Cumbria. :sad:
    What counts has "horrible Cumbria"? :p:
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Emmie3303)
    There's no doubt that a lot of the kids get no discipline from home, but that doesn't mean that the discipline they receive in school needs to be so suffocating. The cane is an archaic form of punishment that didn't really work on the most disruptive pupils anyway. It just caused resentment, as these rules have done. It's not 'nicey nicey crap' all the time. Did you see the programme on BBC recently about a group of year 5 and 6 boy pupils in an Essex primary school? They were seriously behind in reading, so the school brought in Gareth Malone who gave the kids lots of exciting things to do and made an outdoor classroom in return for harder work from them in the future. In 8 weeks one of the boys reading age went up by 20 months, and many by more than 5 months.
    you have the same ideas as all the top education leaders. and its not working. its not working because there are thousands of schools with a 34% pass rate. all this nicey nicey crap has been applied for the last 20 years. times up. ive lived near a horrible city for the last 2 years and i have built up a hate for the people of this city. unemployment is huge and its full of school drop outs who are drunk on my bus at lunchtime, with 20 year old men wearing sports clothing poking me on the bus if i close my eyes. its not the schools fault its the culture of uk. but this nicey crap does not help.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by LazyWorseThanInfidel)
    you have the same ideas as all the top education leaders. and its not working. its not working because there are thousands of schools with a 34% pass rate. all this nicey nicey crap has been applied for the last 20 years. times up. ive lived near a horrible city for the last 2 years and i have built up a hate for the people of this city. unemployment is huge and its full of school drop outs who are drunk on my bus at lunchtime, with 20 year old men wearing sports clothing poking me on the bus if i close my eyes. its not the schools fault its the culture of uk. but this nicey crap does not help.
    I disagree with the education leaders if they are the one's responsible for what we have now. It's not all rubbish. Should we change the way we teach in recognition of our changing society (I dislike the 'culture' of Britain as much as you seem to, but that's no reason to ignore it) or try and revert to old ideas that unfortunately will no longer work?
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Bently7)
    What counts has "horrible Cumbria"? :p:
    To me: Barrow. URGH. I live there in the uni holidays and I hate it.

    Despite being Cumbrian, I've never actually been to Whitehaven, Maryport, Carlisle...loads of places. So I can't judge most of northern Cumbria. I love Ulverston and the Lakes to bits but I can't bloody stand living in Barrow.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Wow, that's more than a little idiotic to be excluding pupils for such small things. I go to an Academy (although it may be different since it was one of the first ten in the country to be made) and it's nowhere near that rediculous; and our grades are generally really good - maybe this school should focus on actually teaching their kids instead of speshing about what their shoes' coulours are XD
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Emmie3303)
    I disagree with the education leaders if they are the one's responsible for what we have now. It's not all rubbish. Should we change the way we teach in recognition of our changing society (I dislike the 'culture' of Britain as much as you seem to, but that's no reason to ignore it) or try and revert to old ideas that unfortunately will no longer work?
    you can't teach naughty children. if i was given a class of 15 naughty children and i lived in north korea, i would shout, i would cane them, i would make consequences for them, i would make them do lines and complete exercises on their own. the british way is to earn their respect and get them to have fun while learning. good luck to me.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    The Evening Mail is a ***** source of information.

    I hope the iron fist of the academy continues. Forza Dougie and Wilson.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I got sent home a few times from the Academy I went to for not wearing Grey socks because I couldn't find any in the shops. About 3/4 of the school got sent home for similar reasons as well so they scrapped it in the end.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Emmie3303)
    I'm not advocating rule breaking. It's the mode of punishment that is ridiculous. In an attempt to create strict discipline they have lost sight of what school is actually for: learning.
    That happened years ago in the name of getting stupid and lazy kids through exams. (Which, if the national pass rate for 5 GCSEs grade A-C truly is 46%, has been a miserable failure.)
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Emmie3303)
    I disagree with the education leaders if they are the one's responsible for what we have now. It's not all rubbish. Should we change the way we teach in recognition of our changing society (I dislike the 'culture' of Britain as much as you seem to, but that's no reason to ignore it) or try and revert to old ideas that unfortunately will no longer work?
    I shudder to think how high school mathematics would be taught with respect to our current social trends.

    "Your instantaneous Friday night blood alcohol content may be expressed as A of t, where t is the time in seconds from the instant the first jägerbomb meets your throat, and may be calculated by integrating A-prime of t with respect to t, where A-prime is the product of the number of units of alcohol consumed ber hour and the rate at which alcohol is absorbed by the intestinal lining per unit of alcohol currently present in the digestive tract."
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    When I started at my high school it was the best in the area and then we got a new head who enforced strict rules about uniform; like you would get put in isolation all day if you didn't have your jumper/blazer/tie. She quit at Christmas because she couldn't take the criticism of running the worst school in the area.
    She also tried to ban unnatural hair colours (I had bright red hair at the time as well) and coloured hair accessories. I honestly don't see how having a coloured bow around your ponytail affects the how well you will learn.
    Rules to stop disruption to lessons should be enforced strictly - children who are disturbing the education of others should be removed from the situation so as not to impact on someone else's education - but being overly strict about uniform and appearance is ridiculous - it makes no difference. I was forever being told to remove my eyeliner and nail varnish and there were comments about my hair colour, but I came out top girl in my year and a serious anomaly with 10 A*-A.
    Her 5 A*-C statistics were about the same as this school, and this really isn't the way to go about changing it.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by The Referee)
    Permit children to decide whether a rule is there for a reason? I'm sorry but that is just absured! What happens when they decide that the legal drinking age is there for no reason? Or the drink drive laws? Not to mention any number of other laws that already seem to be ignored with impunity!

    Young people need to learn that the rules DO serve a purpose, they ensure that everyone in the school knows the expected standard - backing this up with a sanction reinforces the point. Seemingly trivial rules are there to set the standards and the tone of the school; when these standards are enforced consistently, everyone knows what is expected of them. Where consistent responses are not in place, you only need one person to get away with breaking a rule and others will follow suit - it send the message that respecting the authority of the teacher and the rules they lay down is optional.

    Where is lack of respect with regard to 'trivial' matters, a lack of respect on more serious matters tends to follow.
    Teaching unthinking obedience to children is a catastrophic idea. Do you honestly think that pushing such petty rules onto teenagers is likely to result in an atmosphere of respect?

    You can't mould the sort of culture the head seems to be aiming for from the top-down. All the tit's succeeded in doing's earning the loathing of every child in the school.

    Only a complete arse would think otherw-
    Member of the TSR Conservative Party
    Figures.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by The Referee)
    Permit children to decide whether a rule is there for a reason? I'm sorry but that is just absured! What happens when they decide that the legal drinking age is there for no reason? Or the drink drive laws? Not to mention any number of other laws that already seem to be ignored with impunity!

    Young people need to learn that the rules DO serve a purpose, they ensure that everyone in the school knows the expected standard - backing this up with a sanction reinforces the point. Seemingly trivial rules are there to set the standards and the tone of the school; when these standards are enforced consistently, everyone knows what is expected of them. Where consistent responses are not in place, you only need one person to get away with breaking a rule and others will follow suit - it send the message that respecting the authority of the teacher and the rules they lay down is optional.

    Where is lack of respect with regard to 'trivial' matters, a lack of respect on more serious matters tends to follow.
    If you impose rules that have no purpose then children will begin to question the purpose of other rules. Enforcing pointless rules will just cause them to feel victimised and resentful, leading to worse behaviour.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by LazyWorseThanInfidel)
    you can't teach naughty children. if i was given a class of 15 naughty children and i lived in north korea, i would shout, i would cane them, i would make consequences for them, i would make them do lines and complete exercises on their own. the british way is to earn their respect and get them to have fun while learning. good luck to me.
    You want our kids to be treated the same way as they would in North Korea?!
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    34%! That's incredible- only 34% got 5 Cs?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Redbeard the Mighty)
    I shudder to think how high school mathematics would be taught with respect to our current social trends.

    "Your instantaneous Friday night blood alcohol content may be expressed as A of t, where t is the time in seconds from the instant the first jägerbomb meets your throat, and may be calculated by integrating A-prime of t with respect to t, where A-prime is the product of the number of units of alcohol consumed ber hour and the rate at which alcohol is absorbed by the intestinal lining per unit of alcohol currently present in the digestive tract."
    That would be quite terrible :p:. What I meant is that we've got to respond to the fact that discipline is not strong at home anymore. We can't force parents to discipline their kids, and neither can a school succeed without parental input. We've got to recognise that an iron fist just comes across as a big laugh to most kids. Get rid of the stupid rules and kids could become much more receptive to the ones that matter. It's a long shot, but it's got to be better than what we already have.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by chinaberry)
    34%! That's incredible- only 34% got 5 Cs?
    Yeah - not surprising though, if the headteacher doesn't let anyone attend lessons!
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: October 5, 2010
Poll
Do you agree with the PM's proposal to cut tuition fees for some courses?
Useful resources

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.