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    I realise that this thread may well become quite inflammatory, with strong opinions from all sides, but my aim isn't to stoke such anger -- it is merely to ask the following: should a British school, whatever its religious status, be allowed to make compulsory [for female students] such a uniform whose wearing necessarily conceals all but the whites of the eyes?

    Also, I don't usually read the Telegraph, but I do like to challenge myself by reading media outside my comfort zone every now and again.

    Here's the article to discuss: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education...amic-veil.html
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    There shouldn't be a single faith school in the first place.

    But.. I guess it could just be part of the uniform. Of course male students would have to wear burkhas as well to preserve their honour and modesty(lol). Because of course males and females are equal in the eyes of allah.. right? :rolleyes:
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    No, absolutely not.
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    If the school is a Islamic school then yes, its a dress code set by the school, if you dont like it apply for a mixed school where you learn about evolution.
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    (Original post by Spexzzz)
    If the school is a Islamic school then yes, its a dress code set by the school, if you dont like it apply for a mixed school where you learn about evolution.
    Aye, but what if your parents want you to be a nice Islamic maiden, and send you off to such a school on their wishes (regardless of your own qualms)? And after a few years it'll probably seem normal and perfectly unquestionable to the child anyway, who'll probably have been well and truly indoctrinated into the faith by that time.

    Personally, I'm with the first poster in that we shouldn't have religiously biased institutions anyway.
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    If it is one of those foreign schools for foreign students who won't be living here then I think it should be ok.

    But if it is for people who have British citizenship and they are like British school then definitely not. I don't think you should even be allowed to wear that on the street, forget about having that as a uniform in school.
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    We shouldn't have faith schools and I'm a theist. If you want to teach your kids about This and his son That then do it on your own table and leave public money alone. :hmmm:
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    (Original post by Koobideh)
    If it is one of those foreign schools for foreign students who won't be living here then I think it should be ok.

    But if it is for people who have British citizenship and they are like British school then definitely not. I don't think you should even be allowed to wear that on the street, forget about having that as a uniform in school.
    All British schools are for people living in Britain (unless there are any e-based ones, which I doubt). :dontknow:
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    (Original post by jismith1989)
    Aye, but what if your parents want you to be a nice Islamic maiden, and send you off to such a school on their wishes (regardless of your own qualms)? And after a few years it'll probably seem normal and perfectly unquestionable to the child anyway, who'll probably have been indoctrinated into the faith by that time.

    Personally, I'm with the first poster in that we shouldn't have religiously biased institutions anyway.
    Considering the exposure to resources, and the most deadly tool out their the "Internet" people tend to make their own decision even if they have been indoctrinated or who have been following the breadcrumbs left by their upbringing. If your dumb enough to follow what your told, without questioning why, then your a moron that need to be led by your parents.
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    (Original post by Spexzzz)
    Considering the exposure to resources, and the most deadly tool out their the "Internet" people tend to make their own decision even if they have been indoctrinated or who have been following the breadcrumbs left by their upbringing. If your dumb enough to follow what your told, without questioning why, then your a moron that need to be led by your parents.
    All of us need to be led by our parents in youth.

    And it's amazing what crap people will believe if they're in a vacuum-packed environment and are exposed to it for long enough. It's also amazing how people will hold tenaciously to strongly held and/or long-held beliefs in the face of new information.
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    An adoption of any kind of primative and barbaric act of oppression would be a step backwards in progress.

    :dontknow:
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    The niqab isn't mandatory in islam, why should it be for schools?
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    Gosh, school uniform policies are anal enough as it is without the school dictating whether student can cut or remove their hair, too o.O
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    (Original post by Spexzzz)
    Considering the exposure to resources, and the most deadly tool out their the "Internet" people tend to make their own decision even if they have been indoctrinated or who have been following the breadcrumbs left by their upbringing. If your dumb enough to follow what your told, without questioning why, then your a moron that need to be led by your parents.
    Congratulations. You know absolutely nothing about human nature.
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    (Original post by jismith1989)
    I realise that this thread may well become quite inflammatory, with strong opinions from all sides, but my aim isn't to stoke such anger -- it is merely to ask the following: should a British school, whatever its religious status, be allowed to make compulsory [for female students] such a uniform whose wearing necessarily conceals all but the whites of the eyes?

    Also, I don't usually read the Telegraph, but I do like to challenge myself by reading media outside my comfort zone every now and again.

    Here's the article to discuss: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education...amic-veil.html
    It's a grossly unpleasant thing to do, but I think that they should be allowed to do it - without any sort of government funding (religious schools should not get government funding).
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    (Original post by jismith1989)
    All of us need to be led by our parents in youth.

    And it's amazing what crap people will believe if they're in a vacuum-packed environment and are exposed to it for long enough. It's also amazing how people will hold tenaciously to strongly held and/or long-held beliefs in the face of new information.
    All of us need to be led by our parents in youth. - This i agree with learning how to behave in public, manners and so on should be taught by our parents, often when you grow older you realize why they said it to you and you realize it makes sense. - Unless your raised up by chavvy parents who teach you to steal or be scum then no, no, no (*Insert french obnoxious stereotypical laugh*).

    When it comes to religion people tend to research for themselves, if your brought up where you cant ask questions that would make me curious which would lead to a decision you'll make based on fact and evidence rather than what you've been told. *Teh internet doesn't lie*. If you arent aware of the reasons why you believe in something but yet you go along then your a lost cause and probably have a IQ of a donkey.

    Most people don't use their brain its quite sad that they follow what their told and they have doubts but still go along with it. *Sheds a tear*
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    (Original post by _Mario_)
    Congratulations. You know absolutely nothing about human nature.
    Human nature = Follow the pack cause your a moron :woo:

    *sarcasm ends/*
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    Never. Never ever. The fact I have lady parts DOES NOT dictate my right to participate.
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    (Original post by Dirac Delta Function)
    It's a grossly unpleasant thing to do, but I think that they should be allowed to do it - without any sort of government funding (religious schools should not get government funding).
    I'm curious, you think that people should be allowed to do grossly unpleasant things? Why? It surely can't be on the grounds of liberty, since such a policy violates the kids liberty to have their faces out in the open.
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    (Original post by jismith1989)
    I'm curious, you think that people should be allowed to do grossly unpleasant things? Why? It surely can't be on the grounds of liberty, since such a policy violates the kids liberty to have their faces out in the open.
    You could use that argument for anything though. Maybe kids should have the liberty to go to school naked, and we should prosecute parents who force their kids to wear clothes, or take a bath when they don't want to. Or maybe they shouldn't have to go to school at all.

    The whole argument about personal rights and liberties can get a bit silly when people lose sense of reality and treat it as a philosophical exercise.
    Children don't have liberty and freedom in the same way that adults do; they are administered by their parents who can decide what their children can and can't do, but we draw lines at certain things which we (somewhat arbitrarily) decide are not acceptable.

    In this case, perhaps the strongest argument that could be made is that it damages children on a psychological level as well on a physical level by reducing their exposure to sunlight and thus, causing a vitamin D deficiency. However, if its only for the duration of the entry and exit of school grounds, it would be a pretty weak argument too.
 
 
 
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