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Careers Advice PLEASE: Depressed Law Student watch

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    you could join the army
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    (Original post by flugestuge)
    ( Since you went to Downing College at Cambridge, you have an excellent chance of success. )
    LOL!
    WHO TOLD YOU I WENT TO DOWNING!?
    Perhaps you should get your facts correct before you incorrectly quote me in order to put someone down.
    UCL is an excellent university and I know of people who have gone to places like Hull and Sheffield who have gained pupillage FIRST time applying. Unless you are in the situation I do not think it correct that you undermine someone's chances in such a way.

    PS - You are only half right in that "[i] have an excellent chance of success", I have pupillage.
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    (Original post by PortiaLovesMcqueen)
    I understand where you are coming from however I believe prevention is better than cure and there is no reason to spend thousands on something your not sure or certain about. Correct? I think that ends that debate.
    No. That's the point you keep missing, which makes this thread ultimately pointless. Saying you don't want to do a degree because you might not like practicing in that field is just nonsense. Saying you don't want to do a degree like law because you don't "like it" is also a little too pre-emptive; the majority doing subjects like law don't love it either - it's something you acclimatise to and realise it's either worth pursuing or interesting in certain areas. Not everything you do is going to be enjoyable the entire time.
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    You like the Theory of Law. So go and do it. And then teach it.
    Simples
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    Do not be put off law just because you didn;t like corporate law in practice. I never wanted to do law, but applied for it partially due to parental pressure, didn;t enjoy all the modules (I hated company law with a passion, as well as land law and criminal) but once I got to second year and got the chance to explore the law a bit more I found myself loving a number of the courses. I got the opportunity to study in the US and that just made my mind up - I could be a lawyer and not work in commercial/city law. I got involved in pro bono and explored some more.

    There are so many areas of law, and as someone who did law but didnt want to be a lawyer, there are so many careers where a law degree can be a big asset. I am heading into public service as my interest is human rights and international law. And as planar suggested consider academia.

    But if you really don't want to study law study something else, do some research. No body on this board can tell you anything other than their own personal experience of law, we can't tell you what is right for you. Check out the other boards for other careers here, look at similar degrees (business, economics, politics, international affairs etc) and then look at the potential careers with those degrees. But if you enjoy studying law don't rule it out just because you don't like the wrking environment.
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    In pretty much the exact same boat as OP just not as good grades and I've only just started A2.

    I suggest seeing a proffessional careers advisor instead of speaking to that woman you were on about; atleast that's what I'm gonna do.

    I too, intend on eventually working/studying in the US, but i didn't have any idea about the conversion costs, so that dream has been pooed on.

    Good luck with whatever you decide to do, you've clearly got a head on your shoulders so I'm sure you'll do fine.
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    Such amazing advice on here!
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    OK there are some factual inaccuracies here that need to be nailed

    (Original post by PortiaLovesMcqueen)
    ...
    Please note the following facts:

    1) Law degrees are not vocational

    Do a law degree and you are pretty much in the same position as someone who did an Economics/History/Politics degree. All the jobs they can apply for you can apply for.

    Doing law does not mean you'll become a lawyer. From my law course, roughly 50-60% of the people on it became lawyers. The rest became something else - teachers, bankers, civil service people, businesspeople, technicians, you name it. Conversely, at my law firm, only about 50% of the people training with me did law degrees.

    There are plenty of people who do law degrees but have no interest in becoming a lawyer, and there are plenty of people who want to become lawyers but have no interest in doing a law degree. Doing a law degree does NOT NOT NOT NOT NOT restrict you to a particular career choice.


    2) Qualifications not being recognised abroad

    Your law degree is recognised abroad as an excellent degree, in exactly the same way that a History or English degree is recognised. It just won't give you an automatic right to practice in that country.

    It isn't just lawyers who face this problem. Bankers who pass the FSA's exams in London can't just jump across to Wall Street. People who do Politics are doing English Politics and can't directly apply that to America or Europe either.

    3) Costs

    If you get a Training Contract at uni, your costs will be met - tuition fee costs, practice certificate costs and so on. I'm a trainee at a MC firm and have had to shell out absolutely nothing, and got 8k to cover my living expenses during the LPC.


    4) Interest

    The ONLY question that's relevant is whether you are interested in studying law academically. If you are, you are doing the right course, even if you have absolutely no interest in becoming a lawyer. Unless you plan to be a History teacher or an English teacher there is no disadvantage to you doing law over English/History/Politics.

    5) America

    Please drop the idea of working in America for now. Its extremely difficult to get a visa. It isn't straight forward to move across no matter what you do. You might get away with it at an international law firm in London with offices in America if you gain experience of a relevant practice in the U.S. such as structured finance or loan finance, but this isn't the kind of work you want to do. Working in the U.S. is something you may be able to do in the future, but not as a graduate (unless you have citizenship; I'm assuming you don't).

    6) Student Loans

    You talked a lot about loans but I'm not sure if you meant student loans. If you did, don't worry: you pay 10% of what you earn above £15,000 in a year and not anything more. If you don't earn, you don't pay, and interest = inflation. Its more like a tax.



    Hope thats helpful. Just chill and relax. Don't try to make decisions about your future career until you've been to university and had a chance to go to some careers fairs.
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    My personal advice is, go to UCL and do the law degree and get at least a 2.1. Then get some internships in other industries to figure out what else you'd be interested in. The trick is to expose yourself to as many random things as possibly within those 3 years at university and you should, hopefully, get a clearer idea.
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    (Original post by jacketpotato)
    OK there are some factual inaccuracies here that need to be nailed



    Please note the following facts:

    1) Law degrees are not vocational

    Do a law degree and you are pretty much in the same position as someone who did an Economics/History/Politics degree. All the jobs they can apply for you can apply for.

    Doing law does not mean you'll become a lawyer. From my law course, roughly 50-60% of the people on it became lawyers. The rest became something else - teachers, bankers, civil service people, businesspeople, technicians, you name it. Conversely, at my law firm, only about 50% of the people training with me did law degrees.

    There are plenty of people who do law degrees but have no interest in becoming a lawyer, and there are plenty of people who want to become lawyers but have no interest in doing a law degree. Doing a law degree does NOT NOT NOT NOT NOT restrict you to a particular career choice.


    2) Qualifications not being recognised abroad

    Your law degree is recognised abroad as an excellent degree, in exactly the same way that a History or English degree is recognised. It just won't give you an automatic right to practice in that country.

    It isn't just lawyers who face this problem. Bankers who pass the FSA's exams in London can't just jump across to Wall Street. People who do Politics are doing English Politics and can't directly apply that to America or Europe either.

    3) Costs

    If you get a Training Contract at uni, your costs will be met - tuition fee costs, practice certificate costs and so on. I'm a trainee at a MC firm and have had to shell out absolutely nothing, and got 8k to cover my living expenses during the LPC.


    4) Interest

    The ONLY question that's relevant is whether you are interested in studying law academically. If you are, you are doing the right course, even if you have absolutely no interest in becoming a lawyer. Unless you plan to be a History teacher or an English teacher there is no disadvantage to you doing law over English/History/Politics.

    5) America

    Please drop the idea of working in America for now. Its extremely difficult to get a visa. It isn't straight forward to move across no matter what you do. You might get away with it at an international law firm in London with offices in America if you gain experience of a relevant practice in the U.S. such as structured finance or loan finance, but this isn't the kind of work you want to do. Working in the U.S. is something you may be able to do in the future, but not as a graduate (unless you have citizenship; I'm assuming you don't).

    6) Student Loans

    You talked a lot about loans but I'm not sure if you meant student loans. If you did, don't worry: you pay 10% of what you earn above £15,000 in a year and not anything more. If you don't earn, you don't pay, and interest = inflation. Its more like a tax.



    Hope thats helpful. Just chill and relax. Don't try to make decisions about your future career until you've been to university and had a chance to go to some careers fairs.
    This is the best post in this thread by a country mile.

    You have completely and utterly misunderstood the nature of a law degree. Studying a law degree and becoming a lawyer are mutually exclusive in pretty much the same way that studying an English degree and becoming a lawyer are mutually exclusive. You say that you like studying theoretical law, which is exactly what a law degree is. A law degree is in no way vocational and there is absolutely no obligation for to you work in a legal field following graduation.

    There are obviously particular benefits to a law degree if you want to become a lawyer (i.e. you don't need to do the GDL), but if you want a career in a different area a law degree is just as well-respected (both domestically and abroad) as a degree in Economics, History or English. Therefore you choice of degree should be based solely on what you would be most interested in studying academically.

    Before you make any rash decisions you need to get your facts straight and stop conflating the completely different issues of studying law and practising law. It would be very sad for you to throw away the chance to study a prestigious subject at a prestigious university because of a fundamental misunderstanding.
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    (Original post by jacketpotato)
    OK there are some factual inaccuracies here that need to be nailed



    Please note the following facts:

    1) Law degrees are not vocational

    Do a law degree and you are pretty much in the same position as someone who did an Economics/History/Politics degree. All the jobs they can apply for you can apply for.

    Doing law does not mean you'll become a lawyer. From my law course, roughly 50-60% of the people on it became lawyers. The rest became something else - teachers, bankers, civil service people, businesspeople, technicians, you name it. Conversely, at my law firm, only about 50% of the people training with me did law degrees.

    There are plenty of people who do law degrees but have no interest in becoming a lawyer, and there are plenty of people who want to become lawyers but have no interest in doing a law degree. Doing a law degree does NOT NOT NOT NOT NOT restrict you to a particular career choice.


    2) Qualifications not being recognised abroad

    Your law degree is recognised abroad as an excellent degree, in exactly the same way that a History or English degree is recognised. It just won't give you an automatic right to practice in that country.

    It isn't just lawyers who face this problem. Bankers who pass the FSA's exams in London can't just jump across to Wall Street. People who do Politics are doing English Politics and can't directly apply that to America or Europe either.

    3) Costs

    If you get a Training Contract at uni, your costs will be met - tuition fee costs, practice certificate costs and so on. I'm a trainee at a MC firm and have had to shell out absolutely nothing, and got 8k to cover my living expenses during the LPC.


    4) Interest

    The ONLY question that's relevant is whether you are interested in studying law academically. If you are, you are doing the right course, even if you have absolutely no interest in becoming a lawyer. Unless you plan to be a History teacher or an English teacher there is no disadvantage to you doing law over English/History/Politics.

    5) America

    Please drop the idea of working in America for now. Its extremely difficult to get a visa. It isn't straight forward to move across no matter what you do. You might get away with it at an international law firm in London with offices in America if you gain experience of a relevant practice in the U.S. such as structured finance or loan finance, but this isn't the kind of work you want to do. Working in the U.S. is something you may be able to do in the future, but not as a graduate (unless you have citizenship; I'm assuming you don't).

    6) Student Loans

    You talked a lot about loans but I'm not sure if you meant student loans. If you did, don't worry: you pay 10% of what you earn above £15,000 in a year and not anything more. If you don't earn, you don't pay, and interest = inflation. Its more like a tax.



    Hope thats helpful. Just chill and relax. Don't try to make decisions about your future career until you've been to university and had a chance to go to some careers fairs.



    THANKS
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    (Original post by TommehR)
    This is the best post in this thread by a country mile.

    You have completely and utterly misunderstood the nature of a law degree. Studying a law degree and becoming a lawyer are mutually exclusive in pretty much the same way that studying an English degree and becoming a lawyer are mutually exclusive. You say that you like studying theoretical law, which is exactly what a law degree is. A law degree is in no way vocational and there is absolutely no obligation for to you work in a legal field following graduation.

    There are obviously particular benefits to a law degree if you want to become a lawyer (i.e. you don't need to do the GDL), but if you want a career in a different area a law degree is just as well-respected (both domestically and abroad) as a degree in Economics, History or English. Therefore you choice of degree should be based solely on what you would be most interested in studying academically.

    Before you make any rash decisions you need to get your facts straight and stop conflating the completely different issues of studying law and practising law. It would be very sad for you to throw away the chance to study a prestigious subject at a prestigious university because of a fundamental misunderstanding.

    They are my opinions.
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    (Original post by PortiaLovesMcqueen)
    They are my opinions.
    What are your opinions? Your 'opinions' in your original post are almost exclusively based upon the faulty premise that studying a law degree means you have to then become a lawyer.
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    If you don't want to do law why have you posted on a legal thread? Post your attributes/interests on a careers thread and see if anyone comes up with something interesting.

    Most of the people here quite like law (hence being on a legal thread) and will either try to persuade you to do law (apparently lawyers are quite good at persuasion) or dissuade you because you are their competition.

    Good luck!
 
 
 
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