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    I have just started a Law degree but i want to go to work and live in America, and all i'm learning about is 'English legal systems' and the fact we don't have a constitution... which obviously America does. Also i believe that you can't work in America with a English Law Degree...

    If i leave my course do i have to pay the fee's still?
    And i am in university halls of residence, so if i leave my course will they release me from my contract so i don't have to pay for that?

    Because i plan to work solidly for the next year then (hopefully if i earn enough) go to America and get my degree.

    I don't know if i am wasting my time by being here as it isnt what i want to learn about and I it won't really get me anywhere, but then there is the side of the argument that i could get my degree, then work for a couple of years so i have the money to pay for the fee's in America, and do it that way, but that is like 5 years down the line and that's a long time, and a lot changes in 5 years.

    So i guess my question is: if i leave my course, do i stil have to pay for my course fee's and accomodation fee's? and Would it be better for me to leave and work for a year and then go to America to get my degree?

    Thank you in advance
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    It depends purely on the contract between you and the university. You should reread it. Tuition fees are probably a lost cause, on the other hand it is unlikely that you would need to pay for your accommation.
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    do you have the US residency status that allows you to work there?
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    (Original post by beefmaster)
    do you have the US residency status that allows you to work there?

    The Visa i would have to get to study at the University I want to go to allows me to work in the on-site places like Uni stores and stuff but if i wish to get a job outside of the Uni i have to ask the immigration officer (so to speak) but if i applied for a residency Visa would i be able to study? because i want to work and live there anyways...
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    I was always told that a law degree from England was only worth anything in England and Wales. You can't even practise in Scotland with it. So yes, you'd need a degree from America to practise law there.

    The problem with dropping out and doing this is if you get homesick and want to come home because you wouldn't be able to use your American law degree here.
    I'd do both, if possible?
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    (Original post by Kloak)
    The Visa i would have to get to study at the University I want to go to allows me to work in the on-site places like Uni stores and stuff but if i wish to get a job outside of the Uni i have to ask the immigration officer (so to speak) but if i applied for a residency Visa would i be able to study? because i want to work and live there anyways...
    getting a student visa is a completely different game to getting a 'green card'.

    You should have a read up on the likelihood of that happening before you set your heart on it.
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    (Original post by Kloak)
    I have just started a Law degree but i want to go to work and live in America, and all i'm learning about is 'English legal systems' and the fact we don't have a constitution... which obviously America does. Also i believe that you can't work in America with a English Law Degree...

    If i leave my course do i have to pay the fee's still?
    And i am in university halls of residence, so if i leave my course will they release me from my contract so i don't have to pay for that?

    Because i plan to work solidly for the next year then (hopefully if i earn enough) go to America and get my degree.

    I don't know if i am wasting my time by being here as it isnt what i want to learn about and I it won't really get me anywhere, but then there is the side of the argument that i could get my degree, then work for a couple of years so i have the money to pay for the fee's in America, and do it that way, but that is like 5 years down the line and that's a long time, and a lot changes in 5 years.

    So i guess my question is: if i leave my course, do i stil have to pay for my course fee's and accomodation fee's? and Would it be better for me to leave and work for a year and then go to America to get my degree?

    Thank you in advance
    Transfer university if you can. I know 2 universities that do American Law one of which starts in the second year which is Nottingham I believe.
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    I have read up on it, i have meetings with what is essentially an immigration officer where i have to give valid reasons why it's important i study there rather than here to which my response would be 'A degree in law obtained from here isn't valid in the US' so i think that's valid enough. Although i think you can use an American Law degree here for some reason.

    How much do you reckon it would cost for the full duration of the degree?
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    I know someone who went to University in Wales, wants to move to Scotland and can't even do that because she can't practise as a lawyer here. There should be an exam you can take to become a lawyer in different countries after you graduate.
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    (Original post by Kloak)
    I have read up on it, i have meetings with what is essentially an immigration officer where i have to give valid reasons why it's important i study there rather than here to which my response would be 'A degree in law obtained from here isn't valid in the US' so i think that's valid enough. Although i think you can use an American Law degree here for some reason.

    How much do you reckon it would cost for the full duration of the degree?
    Well for one of the better private universities you are looking at up to $35,000 a year in fees alone.

    With regards to the visa, I was not referring to a student visa as I said that is completely different. You say you want to stay and work after your studies, and presumably practise law, that is where it will be hard to get a visa.
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    well to get a 'green card' there are quite close knit criteria, such as you have family members in the US, or you invest like $500k (which obviously being a student i don't have) so i figure i would have to get a student visa until i had gained my degree then apply for green card as i would be a 'skilled person' etc.

    Or perhaps i could contact some american Law firms and gain their sponsorship... (long shot but who knows...) as i know that employment sponsership is agood way to get a green card.
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    Lolol, yeah, you're really going to earn all the fees needed to study a degree in the USA, from 1 year working fulltime.

    Go back to dreamland.

    Oh and btw, you should know, that in the USA, you can only do law as a postgrad. That means you have to do a different degree first, and then once you graduate, you start law. Do some research before making stupid threads.
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    (Original post by Bubbles*de*Milo)
    Lolol, yeah, you're really going to earn all the fees needed to study a degree in the USA, from 1 year working fulltime.

    Go back to dreamland.

    Oh and btw, you should know, that in the USA, you can only do law as a postgrad. That means you have to do a different degree first, and then once you graduate, you start law. Do some research before making stupid threads.
    No reason to go off on one, man's allowed to dream and ask questions...
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    (Original post by Kloak)
    well to get a 'green card' there are quite close knit criteria, such as you have family members in the US, or you invest like $500k (which obviously being a student i don't have) so i figure i would have to get a student visa until i had gained my degree then apply for green card as i would be a 'skilled person' etc.

    Or perhaps i could contact some american Law firms and gain their sponsorship... (long shot but who knows...) as i know that employment sponsership is agood way to get a green card.
    Right...but what about all of the thousands of other US citizens that have degrees? Why should they give you a green card to work rather than let their own students work? I don't think that having an undergraduate degree will make you a 'skilled person' as you put it.

    Also with regards to employment, yes that is a good way to get a green card. But it is incredibly difficult to to get. To give you a picture, a friend of mind (British) has completed their law studies at Columbia Law school. Still this person can not get sponsorship from an American firm as it is cheaper and easier to employ their own law graduates, which are in abundance.

    It is great you have a dream, but the realities are a lot harder than you seem to be admitting to yourself.

    If I was you I would finish my degree here and practise law in the UK, and have lots of holidays abroad to the US. Also something to consider is that liking somewhere you visit when you are on holiday does not mean that you will like to live there, I am experiencing that myself right now!!
 
 
 
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