Differences between Psy BA and BSc Watch

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Mario87
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Could anyone please tell me what the difference between a BA undergraduate degree in Psychology, a BSc in Psychology and a BSc in Applied Psychology. I am presuming that there is a difference because they have all got different UCAS codes.
It would be a real help, ta [/SIZE]
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cobra
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In sum cases the BSc covers the more scientrific aspects while the BA more philosophical, but i dont really know sum leave it to the 3rd year to choose which ur degree will be in
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James_W
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Er.. my Psychology teacher said that the BSc in Psychology is accredited by the British Psychological Society and so you are a Chartered Psychologist once you graduate... whereas the BA isn't as recognised by the BPS.

Psychology looks like a decent degree, I've really enjoyed it as A Level so far.
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.NK
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(Original post by James_W)
Er.. my Psychology teacher said that the BSc in Psychology is accredited by the British Psychological Society and so you are a Chartered Psychologist once you graduate... whereas the BA isn't as recognised by the BPS.

Psychology looks like a decent degree, I've really enjoyed it as A Level so far.
It depends which uni you're at doing psychology.

Both the BA and BSc courses are accredited at all the unis I looked at (Nottingham, Newcastle, Leicester, Lancaster, Leeds and Reading).

The first year is pretty much the same regardless of whether you're doing a BA or BSc - here at Notts we choose which we want to do in the second year based on which modules we choose. If you're doing biological psych or neuroscience modules from psychology or science based modules from outside of psychology then you get a BSc. If you choose more social psychology modules or arty modules such as philosophy or classics then you get a BA.

I emailed all the unis I applied to about it and they said to apply for whichever fitted best with my Alevels - as I had a science I applied for a BSc. All of them said that you can change if you want to, they don't have quotas to fill for each type.

Hope that's of some use Feel free to PM me if you want more info about psych at degree level.
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darknessishope
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(Original post by James_W)
Er.. my Psychology teacher said that the BSc in Psychology is accredited by the British Psychological Society and so you are a Chartered Psychologist once you graduate... whereas the BA isn't as recognised by the BPS.

Psychology looks like a decent degree, I've really enjoyed it as A Level so far.
I don't think BSc and BA decide a BPS course, the BPS has a site with all the unis they have under them and some of the courses are BA. I think that with BSc it is more statistical data and maths while with BA it's more with the reasons behind the illness etc.
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.NK
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(Original post by darknessishope)
I think that with BSc it is more statistical data and maths while with BA it's more with the reasons behind the illness etc.
Applied psychology is more to do with statistical data.

A BSc involves more biological and neuroscience options, a BA more social options.
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Mario87
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(Original post by .NK)
Applied psychology is more to do with statistical data.

A BSc involves more biological and neuroscience options, a BA more social options.
Ta for all the advice, i've looked at all of the prospectuses and most of them are now accredited by the BPS. I think that they should specify a bit more clearly what EACH course involves rather than just describing the most popular. For example in the Durham prospectus they say that you can do a BSc in Applied Psychology, a BSc in Psychology or a BA in Psychology!!! And others (like oxford) only do a BSc in Experimental Psychology. As i prefer the social aspect iwould probably do the BA, but my AS-Levels are Psychology, Biology, Media Studies, Clasical Civilisations and Critical thinking. From what you are saying this means that i dont HAVE to do a science based degree, good!!! LOL
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rah
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(Original post by Mario87)
Ta for all the advice, i've looked at all of the prospectuses and most of them are now accredited by the BPS. I think that they should specify a bit more clearly what EACH course involves rather than just describing the most popular. For example in the Durham prospectus they say that you can do a BSc in Applied Psychology, a BSc in Psychology or a BA in Psychology!!! And others (like oxford) only do a BSc in Experimental Psychology. As i prefer the social aspect iwould probably do the BA, but my AS-Levels are Psychology, Biology, Media Studies, Clasical Civilisations and Critical thinking. From what you are saying this means that i dont HAVE to do a science based degree, good!!! LOL
my friend said durham are trying to get rid of their BA and make them all BSc, it think this is happening across quite a lot of uni's to try and make the psych degree look more respectable
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.NK
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(Original post by Mario87)
Ta for all the advice, i've looked at all of the prospectuses and most of them are now accredited by the BPS. I think that they should specify a bit more clearly what EACH course involves rather than just describing the most popular. For example in the Durham prospectus they say that you can do a BSc in Applied Psychology, a BSc in Psychology or a BA in Psychology!!! And others (like oxford) only do a BSc in Experimental Psychology. As i prefer the social aspect iwould probably do the BA, but my AS-Levels are Psychology, Biology, Media Studies, Clasical Civilisations and Critical thinking. From what you are saying this means that i dont HAVE to do a science based degree, good!!! LOL
Glad I've been of some use

I was going to apply to Oxbridge until I found out that Cambridge required two sciences and Oxford only offered experimental psychology.

From your AS-levels you could focus on either the social side (using media studies) or the scientific side (using biology) easily.

You don't have to do a science based degree, but even the BA courses have a fair amount of biology in them. If you do biology up to A2 you'll find the biological side of psychology a lot more straight forward....then again, if I have to explain action potentials one more time I'm going to cry - two years of sixth form and now another year at uni talking about neurons!
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