Kanitab
Badges: 2
#1
Report Thread starter 9 years ago
#1
Hi guys! I'm in a bit of a pickle at the moment. I've just graduated from Brunel university with a 2:1 English degree and now i've been thinking about teaching. When I first graduated I wanted to do a TEFl course and teach abroad, but now im in two states of mind.i've found a specialised teaching college in Notting Hill that does a Master of Arts in TEaching English as a Foreign Language. The way i see it, even if i don't teach abroad, because it's a masters it will be recognised In england so i could teach people whose first language isn't english over here. However i've heard that with the new government coming in they're shutting down a lot of the centres that are open to teaching people english, thus resulting in many job cutbacks. so i've been advised to do a pgce as that way i'm more likely to get a job out of it when i finish. The thing is that I dont mind doing a pgce but i dont know where to start. i dont know what the best uni to go to is, and i'm sure you need experience before you can get onto the course.
i really need some advice because my heart is still set on the TEFL but apparantly if i dont go abroad with it, then there is no point doing it.
what do you guys think???
0
reply
Hylean
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#2
Report 9 years ago
#2
Having done a TEFL course myself, you won't be able to take the MA TEFL without having first done the certificate and then diploma. Furthermore, you'd still only be able to teach in TEFL centres, to teach in colleges you need separate qualifications, though some TEFL centres are now adding those into their courses.
0
reply
member398873
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#3
Report 9 years ago
#3
PGCE.

You can do an intensive CELTA or TESOL course any time- but that's only if you want to work in the UK and teach English in language schools. If you just want to go abroad, then you can get by on a £200 weekend TEFL course (places like UK-TEFL offer this, I've done one) if you have a degree too.

Places abroad aren't really too fussy, you'd be best off getting your PGCE- then picking up whatever level of TEFL qualification you want later on...
0
reply
alizageorge
Badges: 0
#4
Report 9 years ago
#4
It is possible PGCE with TEFL. Since this covers the principles of education and teaching English as a foreign language, it is generally well liked ELT qualification entry into the profession, well teaching practice can also be done abroad, providing foreign experience - another feature appreciated.
0
reply
evantej
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#5
Report 9 years ago
#5
(Original post by alizageorge)
It is possible PGCE with TEFL. Since this covers the principles of education and teaching English as a foreign language, it is generally well liked ELT qualification entry into the profession, well teaching practice can also be done abroad, providing foreign experience - another feature appreciated.
No. The closest you will come to that is with a PGCE PCE that focuses on literacy.
0
reply
Kanitab
Badges: 2
#6
Report Thread starter 9 years ago
#6
so you think it's better to do a pgce then? i looked into doing the MA in Tefl course and because i've got a degree i can get onto it. But i suppose a pgce may be more beneficial
0
reply
evantej
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#7
Report 9 years ago
#7
(Original post by Kanitab)
so you think it's better to do a pgce then? i looked into doing the MA in Tefl course and because i've got a degree i can get onto it. But i suppose a pgce may be more beneficial
It depends what you want to do.

Personally, I would scrap the masters idea as there are lots of universities that offer masters in English language and linguistics, and some which specialise in teaching English as a foreign language; on a side note, if you are planning on working abroad then it would probably be better to stick to your more prestigious universities which employers will recognise rather than go with some random college in London.

If you do a PGCE then you can teach in the UK and in some foreign countries (international schools); you might find that some TEFL schools let you get away with not having a proper qualification, or they might train you up there. If you do a CELTA course, then it will be cheaper than a masters and you will be qualified to teach anywhere in the world. Of course, it might be better to push for a PGCE now before any changes are made to fees; that is, you can do a CELTA or masters any time.
0
reply
coz1
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#8
Report 8 years ago
#8
PGCE 100%!!

I have just returned to England to complete a PGCE because the truth of the mater is, TEFL is a crap industry, with crap employers, crap pay, and mickey mouse private companies!

Do the PGCE, get avery well paid job in an inetrantional school anywhere in the world(after 1 year experience in an English school)..

I was earning around $1000 a month in Indonesia working for EF a private language centre, but my friend was working just 10 mins from me in an international school earning around $4000 a month and enjoying a job with career prospects, great benefits, all expenses paid acccom, flights, pension.etc.

We both enjoyed our jobs, loved the life in the country, but he was getting a much better deal than me, because of the PGCE.

+ he was looked at as a professional, where as the TEFL Industry treats its workers as if they are just back packers looking for beer money(which most are to be honest).

Do a nother year, get your PGCE, and you can enjoy the TEFL lifestyle in style!
4
reply
giella
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#9
Report 8 years ago
#9
(Original post by lechaton-x)
PGCE.

You can do an intensive CELTA or TESOL course any time- but that's only if you want to work in the UK and teach English in language schools. If you just want to go abroad, then you can get by on a £200 weekend TEFL course (places like UK-TEFL offer this, I've done one) if you have a degree too.

Places abroad aren't really too fussy, you'd be best off getting your PGCE- then picking up whatever level of TEFL qualification you want later on...
The CELTA is probably the best starting point. A £200 weekend TEFL course is unlikely to get you a well paid job these days. TEFL is a massive industry these days and students and schools expect the teachers to be trained to a minimum level of competence which the CELTA give you. Any school that doesn't require it as a minimum is worth avoiding at all costs.

CELTA on its own can get you some jobs in the UK but they're mainly found in London. Check TEFL.com and it's jobs board to see an example of the kind of qualifications/level of experience required.

DELTA can only be taken after 1200 hours of teaching [at least as far as my information is up to date], so don't worry too much about this. Masters in TEFL usually take a long time [often upwards of 2 years] and are often designed for practitioners who are already working and have experience.

CELTA will get you a job in Europe and potentially in the UK. I have it and I'm successfully self-employed with it right now. It is an excellent stepping stone for a PGCE or a Masters.

I hope this helps.
1
reply
PeachFuzz
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#10
Report 7 years ago
#10
(Original post by coz1)
PGCE 100%!!

I have just returned to England to complete a PGCE because the truth of the mater is, TEFL is a crap industry, with crap employers, crap pay, and mickey mouse private companies!

Do the PGCE, get avery well paid job in an inetrantional school anywhere in the world(after 1 year experience in an English school)..

I was earning around $1000 a month in Indonesia working for EF a private language centre, but my friend was working just 10 mins from me in an international school earning around $4000 a month and enjoying a job with career prospects, great benefits, all expenses paid acccom, flights, pension.etc.
...

Currently residing in Hong Kong at the moment so a question is burning in me regarding this.
If I intend to take a PGCE to get onto the road of teaching... Would it be better to take the course back in England, or will it suffice to take it locally?
1
reply
Griz
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#11
Report 4 years ago
#11
Do the 120 hours as it is a useful insight. CELTA is about teaching practice and if you have a PGCE you have massively more than they give. Their system is different, very narrow and you might clash with the teacher if you are experienced as it is very formulaic. If you have a PGCE in your own subject, mine is maths, you are a valuable asset. Go for it.
0
reply
GW1992UCL
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#12
Report 4 years ago
#12
(Original post by evantej)
No. The closest you will come to that is with a PGCE PCE that focuses on literacy.
(Original post by coz1)
PGCE 100%!!

I have just returned to England to complete a PGCE because the truth of the mater is, TEFL is a crap industry, with crap employers, crap pay, and mickey mouse private companies!

Do the PGCE, get avery well paid job in an inetrantional school anywhere in the world(after 1 year experience in an English school)..

I was earning around $1000 a month in Indonesia working for EF a private language centre, but my friend was working just 10 mins from me in an international school earning around $4000 a month and enjoying a job with career prospects, great benefits, all expenses paid acccom, flights, pension.etc.

We both enjoyed our jobs, loved the life in the country, but he was getting a much better deal than me, because of the PGCE.

+ he was looked at as a professional, where as the TEFL Industry treats its workers as if they are just back packers looking for beer money(which most are to be honest).

Do a nother year, get your PGCE, and you can enjoy the TEFL lifestyle in style!
(Original post by giella)
The CELTA is probably the best starting point. A £200 weekend TEFL course is unlikely to get you a well paid job these days. TEFL is a massive industry these days and students and schools expect the teachers to be trained to a minimum level of competence which the CELTA give you. Any school that doesn't require it as a minimum is worth avoiding at all costs.

CELTA on its own can get you some jobs in the UK but they're mainly found in London. Check TEFL.com and it's jobs board to see an example of the kind of qualifications/level of experience required.

DELTA can only be taken after 1200 hours of teaching [at least as far as my information is up to date], so don't worry too much about this. Masters in TEFL usually take a long time [often upwards of 2 years] and are often designed for practitioners who are already working and have experience.

CELTA will get you a job in Europe and potentially in the UK. I have it and I'm successfully self-employed with it right now. It is an excellent stepping stone for a PGCE or a Masters.

I hope this helps.
Hi all!

What do you all mean when you say PGCE? I'm not aware of there being a PGCE in TEFL... Would love to do it if there was. I'm thinking of doing CELTA to get into TEFL, then eventually doing DELTA, a Masters and/or a PGCE in MFL (another interest) when I've got a little experience. I want a serious career in language teaching, not a gap year or mickey mouse qualification... What would you advise? Thanks in advance!
0
reply
Griz
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#13
Report 4 years ago
#13
You do seem a bit confused. I have the TEFL qualification but I did that as an adjunct as my PGCE is in Maths, as is my degree. TEFL is really about a set of teaching techniques for students who have limited common language with you. CELTA is about teaching practise but a personal view is that a PGCE is better as it opens more job opportunities and has more real teaching practice.

My PGCE is in Maths and you have no idea how interested people get in that combined with a TEFL qualification. As I understand it a PGCE is equivalent to the DELTA qualification
0
reply
GW1992UCL
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#14
Report 4 years ago
#14
(Original post by Griz)
You do seem a bit confused. I have the TEFL qualification but I did that as an adjunct as my PGCE is in Maths, as is my degree. TEFL is really about a set of teaching techniques for students who have limited common language with you. CELTA is about teaching practise but a personal view is that a PGCE is better as it opens more job opportunities and has more real teaching practice.

My PGCE is in Maths and you have no idea how interested people get in that combined with a TEFL qualification. As I understand it a PGCE is equivalent to the DELTA qualification
Thanks for your reply. My degree is in chemistry and the thing is I really don't want to do a PGCE in chemistry as it's science that I'm wanting to move away from into language teaching! I speak several others languages, do you think I could get onto an MFL PGCE? I'm burdened by this annoying chemistry degree because now everyone wants me to teach chemistry and I don't want to... Do you think DELTA would be just as good? I just want to take relevant and respected qualifications, not ones for teaching e.g. English literature to native speaking kids, or chemistry... I'm hoping to find a PGCE in TEFL when I next do some googling, but as it's designed to meet the needs of uk schools I'm worried it doesn't exist :/
0
reply
Hend Mansour
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#15
Report 4 years ago
#15
i'm graduated from the Faculty of Arts English Department in Egypt .. now i'm doing masters in English Linguistics ..
i'm confused which better for me ?? CELTA or PGCE ?? what they will offer me ??
HELP !! PLZ ^^
0
reply
low2r
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#16
Report 3 years ago
#16
(Original post by GW1992UCL)
Thanks for your reply. My degree is in chemistry and the thing is I really don't want to do a PGCE in chemistry as it's science that I'm wanting to move away from into language teaching! I speak several others languages, do you think I could get onto an MFL PGCE? I'm burdened by this annoying chemistry degree because now everyone wants me to teach chemistry and I don't want to... Do you think DELTA would be just as good? I just want to take relevant and respected qualifications, not ones for teaching e.g. English literature to native speaking kids, or chemistry... I'm hoping to find a PGCE in TEFL when I next do some googling, but as it's designed to meet the needs of uk schools I'm worried it doesn't exist :/
Hi

I have a degree in Biology and have been accepted on a MFL PGCE for September 2016. So if you're passionate about the languages you speak it doesn't really matter what your degree is in
0
reply
GW1992UCL
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#17
Report 3 years ago
#17
Awesome! Can I ask where?
0
reply
low2r
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#18
Report 3 years ago
#18
(Original post by GW1992UCL)
Awesome! Can I ask where?
At the University of East Anglia. If it's really what you want to do and you show you are enthusiastic and passionate about teaching languages it can be done!
0
reply
greenbeans123
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#19
Report 3 years ago
#19
(Original post by Hend Mansour)
i'm graduated from the Faculty of Arts English Department in Egypt .. now i'm doing masters in English Linguistics ..
i'm confused which better for me ?? CELTA or PGCE ?? what they will offer me ??
HELP !! PLZ ^^
On the offchance you're still reading.

The CELTA is one of the more reputable TEFL beginner courses. It'll set you back about a grand and lasts about a month. It involves assessed, observed teaching of real ESL students as well as written assignments and seminars. That and a degree will make you employable in entry-level jobs in the TEFL industry. These jobs tend not to be all that well paid (although this varies by region). In some countries you are also expected to be a native speaker. For more details Google Dave's ESL Cafe.

The PGCE is, just as it says on the tin, a postgrad certificate in education. It costs about 9 grand and takes one academic year to complete. Bursaries are available for some subjects. It is taken in Unis or training providers in England, Wales or Northern Ireland and is primarily for teachers wishing to work in those countries, although it can also be used to work in International Schools teaching a UK curriculum. It usually confers QTS (Qualified Teacher Status) so that you are eligible to work in the UK. It can sometimes give you credits towards completing a Masters.

There is also something called the iPGCE which can be taken outside of the UK. This provides more flexible distance learning and is often used by those who want to work in International Schools who aren't bothered about ever teaching in the UK. It does not confer QTS.
0
reply
njfsthatsme
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#20
Report 3 years ago
#20
PGCE English with Literacy and ESOL at UCL. Nearly finished it. Hard work but you can teach TEFL or GCSE in schools or colleges to kids or adults in UK or abroad. Good luck.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

People at uni: do initiations (like heavy drinking) put you off joining sports societies?

Yes (476)
66.39%
No (241)
33.61%

Watched Threads

View All