How do Indian restaurants make their chicken so tender? Watch

ياسمين
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Hello Foodies

Whenever you get a takeaway curry, the chicken is always amazingly tender and soft. When you make curry at home (at least when I do) I seal the chicken first in a bit of oil or ghee and then I add sauce.

How do they do this? I really want to learn to make something similar to a takeaway curry at home as I spend so much money on takeaways. I think I can do the sauce quite well. I usually use a large frying pan. Could I use a large, shallow stainless steel pot instead? Can I add the chicken after making the sauce and just let it cook for longer or is sealing the meat absolutely necessary?
Should I marinade the chicken? Or perhaps boil it?

If anyone knows, please tell me Thanks!
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Hanz_a93
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All im gona say is: lathi
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rj1990
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Cook it really slow I think.
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Claire_Spoon
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Marinading probably helps.
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3nTr0pY
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Low heat, long time.
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JCM89
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Many restaurants and fast food outlets use cheap chicken that has been injected with water or broth - its supposed to make it more soft and tender. You are probably using better quality meat at home.
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prospectivEEconomist
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use a pressure cooker. dont overcook the chicken.
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IWantSomeMushu
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Beating the chicken to death usually helps.
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brokenangel
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i know this is the chinese takeaway way of doing it but might help, try boiling the chicken until it is 90% cooked then cook as normal ie fry etc. If you have marinated it then cook on a very low heat in the oven & make sure the meat is constantly covered in marinate. (id suggest using some you put asside before adding the chicken to avoid the risk of food poisoning)

Alot of indian currys involve adding the part cooked chicken to the curry sauce the allowing the chicken to finish cooking in the sauce so that you arent drying the meat out.
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FrankRabbit
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Don't use a lid on your pan or the chicken will become stringy due to it getting too hot. Also, cook using a low heat
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916-CALL-TURK
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(Original post by ياسمين)
Hello Foodies

Whenever you get a takeaway curry, the chicken is always amazingly tender and soft. When you make curry at home (at least when I do) I seal the chicken first in a bit of oil or ghee and then I add sauce.

How do they do this? I really want to learn to make something similar to a takeaway curry at home as I spend so much money on takeaways. I think I can do the sauce quite well. I usually use a large frying pan. Could I use a large, shallow stainless steel pot instead? Can I add the chicken after making the sauce and just let it cook for longer or is sealing the meat absolutely necessary?
Should I marinade the chicken? Or perhaps boil it?

If anyone knows, please tell me Thanks!
Meat Tenderiser

[Source: Mother Dearest's endless complaints about how the food we're eating at the restaurant is ****]
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Lamptastic
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Slow cook it?

Also marinading improves the flavour, not necessarily the tenderness of the meat.
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py0alb
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(Original post by JCM89)
Many restaurants and fast food outlets use cheap chicken that has been injected with water or broth - its supposed to make it more soft and tender. You are probably using better quality meat at home.
So if this cheap chicken is softer, tendier and tastier, how is it lower quality meat exactly?
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Harrifer
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(Original post by py0alb)
So if this cheap chicken is softer, tendier and tastier, how is it lower quality meat exactly?
It isn't tastier for having water injected. If anything it would be blander because of the water, not that you can ever taste what's in a curry.

It's lower quality because it's less meat and more water, and obviously less nutritious.
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py0alb
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(Original post by Harrifer)
It isn't tastier for having water injected. If anything it would be blander because of the water, not that you can ever taste what's in a curry.

It's lower quality because it's less meat and more water, and obviously less nutritious.
I thought water was good for you? :confused:


Mmmm juicy chicken with plenty of nice water making it moist and succulent. :yep:
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MrsShifty
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Marinade it in yoghurt and lemon juice first, the acid breaks down the protein fibres in the meat and makes it tender. Don't salt the outside as this draws the juices out and makes the meat dry. Then cook it on a low heat for a long time. I never pan fry chicken any more, worst way to cook it IMO. Far better to poach it first then finish cooking it in a the pan to get the crispy skin.
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Harrifer
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(Original post by py0alb)
I thought water was good for you? :confused:


Mmmm juicy chicken with plenty of nice water making it moist and succulent. :yep:
Quality is subjective really, I get your point. I think the amount of water in the chicken might not be significant in your daily intake, lol.

I don't buy chicken very often, my favourite meat would probably be beef, what about you?
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py0alb
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(Original post by Harrifer)
Quality is subjective really, I get your point. I think the amount of water in the chicken might not be significant in your daily intake, lol.

I don't buy chicken very often, my favourite meat would probably be beef, what about you?

I like a bit of everything to be honest, although nothing beats a nice steak. I have a big chunky sirloin sitting in my fridge waiting for me tonight actually.

Those hot whole roast chickens for £4 from tescos are about the nicest chicken its possible to buy. You can't cook it as nicely as that I don't think.
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Harrifer
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(Original post by py0alb)
I like a bit of everything to be honest, although nothing beats a nice steak. I have a big chunky sirloin sitting in my fridge waiting for me tonight actually.

Those hot whole roast chickens for £4 from tescos are about the nicest chicken its possible to buy. You can't cook it as nicely as that I don't think.
It's a proper spit roast oven thingy, turns it and everything.
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JCM89
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(Original post by py0alb)
So if this cheap chicken is softer, tendier and tastier, how is it lower quality meat exactly?
Because its injected with chicken broth and salt water which might make it tastier (this depends on your palate) but it has a very high salt content - sometimes up to 8 times that of an unaltered piece of chicken. Also, as the injections plump up the meat by up to 20%, you are getting less actual meat for your money.
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