Toby Wan Kenobi
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A possible degree option that I hope to study in the future (at a top 30/40 uni) is Economics, preferably pure BSc or maybe with Finance. I've looked at the modules and it does appear that there are a number of compulsory Maths modules involved.

I am currently study Maths at AS Level and it seems fine at the moment, I received an A at GCSE for Maths but I really didn't put much effort in to be honest. I would like to pursue an Economics degree as I'm studying it at AS Level now and it really interests me and I would like to study it at a higher, more advanced level.

I would like to know just how much Maths is involved in an Economics degree at a decent uni (e.g. Nottingham, Warwick, Exeter, London ones etc) and how difficult the maths gets. What maths methods are used mainly? Could you do Economics at degree level with only AS Maths? etc etc.

Thanks.
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yoyo462001
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All those unis have lots of maths in their courses. Warwick probably has a bit more than the rest but it's nothing that someone who has done A level Maths can't handle. You can do an Economics degree without A level maths though you make your life much harder. Generally A level maths is useful because there's a fair amount of calculus which is fundamentalist to economics, as we are constantly trying to maximise something (within constraints).

If you do a search you'll find lot of topics on this subject.v
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Theconomist
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The maths during an economic degree is MUCH MUCH more fun and interesting than A level counterpart
As long as you get in without A level math go ahead
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Doughnuts!!
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(Original post by yoyo462001)
All those unis have lots of maths in their courses. Warwick probably has a bit more than the rest but it's nothing that someone who has done A level Maths can't handle. You can do an Economics degree without A level maths though you make your life much harder. Generally A level maths is useful because there's a fair amount of calculus which is fundamentalist to economics, as we are constantly trying to maximise something (within constraints).

If you do a search you'll find lot of topics on this subject.v
I've previously considered doing Econ but I was put off by the fact that it'd probably heavily involve statistics (and I HATE Stats! ). Is it really mainly calculus, or does it contain a fair amount of Stats as well?
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spex
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(Original post by Doughnuts!!)
I've previously considered doing Econ but I was put off by the fact that it'd probably heavily involve statistics (and I HATE Stats! ). Is it really mainly calculus, or does it contain a fair amount of Stats as well?
They'll teach you everything you need to know about probability and statistics from scratch. Hopefully much better than the pathetic way it's taught in schools.
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yoyo462001
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(Original post by Doughnuts!!)
I've previously considered doing Econ but I was put off by the fact that it'd probably heavily involve statistics (and I HATE Stats! ). Is it really mainly calculus, or does it contain a fair amount of Stats as well?
3 Parts to an economics degree.

Econometrics - Statistical based (depending on what uni and what modules will contain linear algebra)
Microeconomics - Involves a lot of calculus
Macroeconomics - Less mathematical but can still involve a fair amount of algebra

You can't escape the calculus, however most unis don't require you to do many econometric modules.
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Toby Wan Kenobi
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(Original post by yoyo462001)
3 Parts to an economics degree.

Econometrics - Statistical based (depending on what uni and what modules will contain linear algebra)
Microeconomics - Involves a lot of calculus
Macroeconomics - Less mathematical but can still involve a fair amount of algebra

You can't escape the calculus, however most unis don't require you to do many econometric modules.
how complex does it get? my AS class hasn't actually been introduced to calculus at this point, what exactly does it entail? fortunately I'm doing stats instead of mechanics which should help a bit right?
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yoyo462001
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(Original post by Toby Wan Kenobi)
how complex does it get? my AS class hasn't actually been introduced to calculus at this point, what exactly does it entail? fortunately I'm doing stats instead of mechanics which should help a bit right?
To be honest it's not that complicated. The tricky bit is combining you economics knowledgeable with with your mathematical knowledge. If you want an description of Calculus there's a lot of good websites around that will show you, but you'll get to it very soon anyways. Stats I guess will help, but to be honest it wont help that much.
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MagicNMedicine
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(Original post by Toby Wan Kenobi)
how complex does it get? my AS class hasn't actually been introduced to calculus at this point, what exactly does it entail? fortunately I'm doing stats instead of mechanics which should help a bit right?
Its not that bad. You just learn some rules for how to find the 'rate of change' of a function, which is, if you think about drawing the graph of a function, finding the slope of it at every point.

When you start doing it in AS maths you might think ok whats the point of this but in terms of economics it is very useful because loads of in economics are some form of curve, and what you are usually wanting to find is where the high point (on stuff like profits) or low point (on stuff like costs) is. Calculus enables you to find these high and low points, in A level Maths you will just get told stuff like y = some function of x, find the maxima and minima, but when you do economics you will get told information about a firms costs, the demand function of the market, and you will use calculus to find the output it should be producing to maximise revenue or to maximise profit etc, which is more interesting.

Stats is useful, I can't remember whats on the A level Stats syllabus now, but the things to pay attention to if you want to study economics are when you start doing estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, stuff using normal and t distributions.
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edmhaslam
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I can only speak for Nottingham, but they have two Maths courses - one aimed at those with A-Level Maths, and one aimed at those without.

Even though I got an A at maths, I've still taken the easier maths. I went to a few of the harder module and it is definitely better for those with further maths. The easier maths is easy to do if you have done A-Level maths as it is just applying it to Economics.

I couldn't imagine doing even the easy module without atleast A-level maths due to how fast they go through the course. But if you take A-Level maths it will be a lot easier (at Nottingham) and you still get a BSc even with the easier maths module.
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vivt97
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Hi I dont do A level maths but im thinking of applying to Nottingham next year, I am thinking of just doing an extra AS in maths, do you think that would still help or do I need the full A level for it to be beneficial?
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