Can I become a Doctor with a degree in Biochemistry? Watch

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A level Az
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Could someone explain how this would work? 4 years in University for Biochemistry, and then apply for the medical school within the University for the Medicine degree?
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Yellowmonkeyman
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(Original post by A level Az)
Could someone explain how this would work? 4 years in University for Biochemistry, and then apply for the medical school within the University for the Medicine degree?
Essentially correct but you don't just have to apply within the University, you will have to apply through UCAS to 4 medicine schools and you may put your current University as one of the choices if they do medicine as a degree.
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michael clayton
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(Original post by A level Az)
Could someone explain how this would work? 4 years in University for Biochemistry, and then apply for the medical school within the University for the Medicine degree?
It would be 3 years to complete a BSc in Biochemistry and 4 years to do graduate entry medicine afterwards.
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A level Az
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(Original post by Yellowmonkeyman)
Essentially correct but you don't just have to apply within the University, you will have to apply through UCAS to 4 medicine schools and you may put your current University as one of the choices if they do medicine as a degree.
Thank you. And can I just make sure, the 15th October deadline doesn't include biochemistry does it?
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Yellowmonkeyman
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(Original post by A level Az)
Thank you. And can I just make sure, the 15th October deadline doesn't include biochemistry does it?
You're welcome and nope, the deadline for biochemistry is January.
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apotoftea
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(Original post by A level Az)
Thank you. And can I just make sure, the 15th October deadline doesn't include biochemistry does it?
Not unless you wanted to do Bio-Chem (or its equivalent at Oxford or Cambridge). Have a read of this too, as it's not as simple as just applying after you've done a degree

http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki...cine_-_a_guide
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Warrior King
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(Original post by A level Az)
Could someone explain how this would work? 4 years in University for Biochemistry, and then apply for the medical school within the University for the Medicine degree?

You would need to first complete your undergraduate degree which would take 3 years and assuming you achieved at least a 2:1, then you could apply either for graduate entry Medicine programmes which last 4 years or the standard programme which would last 5 years.

You could apply to the same university in which you are doing Biochemistry in your 3rd year of study however there's no guarantee you would be called for an interview or given an offer given the fierce competition for graduate entry Medicine. As you're aware you can apply to 4 medical schools. A lot of graduates will apply to a mixture of 4 and 5 year programmes as the competition to get onto 4 year programmes is quite intense.

If you do happen to get the grades for Medicine at the end of the year, there's no reason why you shouldn't consider making an application next year for medical school as gaining admission to medical school as an undergraduate isn't as intense and there's also the issue of graduate fees and funding if you decide to do a first degree before Medicine.
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A level Az
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(Original post by apotoftea)
Not unless you wanted to do Bio-Chem (or its equivalent at Oxford or Cambridge). Have a read of this too, as it's not as simple as just applying after you've done a degree

http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki...cine_-_a_guide
Thanks for the link. I was just wondering, why are so many people going for the "Medicine" course (the one with the 15 October deadline) when the same can be achieved studying Biology/Chemistry, as long as you have done the required work to get into Medical school. Am I right in saying that their degree will be the same length as people who do Bio/Chem (3/4 years) and so will be applying for Medical school at around the same time? Or am I mistaken and that Medicine course is what people taking Bio/Chem apply for after 4 years?

I'm a bit confused =/
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Beska
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(Original post by A level Az)
Thanks for the link. I was just wondering, why are so many people going for the "Medicine" course (the one with the 15 October deadline) when the same can be achieved studying Biology/Chemistry, as long as you have done the required work to get into Medical school. Am I right in saying that their degree will be the same length as people who do Bio/Chem (3/4 years) and so will be applying for Medical school at around the same time? Or am I mistaken and that Medicine course is what people taking Bio/Chem apply for after 4 years?
Debt & time!

The A100 (undergraduate) degree is 5/6 years long, while graduate medicine is the length of your undergraduate degree (3~ years) plus 4-6 years (4 years for A101, 5/6 for A100) so 7-9 years long.

Plus, graduate medicine is more competitive than undergraduate medicine.
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apotoftea
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(Original post by A level Az)
Thanks for the link. I was just wondering, why are so many people going for the "Medicine" course (the one with the 15 October deadline) when the same can be achieved studying Biology/Chemistry, as long as you have done the required work to get into Medical school. Am I right in saying that their degree will be the same length as people who do Bio/Chem (3/4 years) and so will be applying for Medical school at around the same time? Or am I mistaken and that Medicine course is what people taking Bio/Chem apply for after 4 years?

I suppose the Medicine degree covers everything you need to know in alot more detail than degrees such as Biochemistry? That must be the reason.
You can't become a doctor without doing the Medicine degree, simples. It also means a straight 5 years (6 if you inter-calculate) then apply for FY1 posts and start the career progression (easier said than done though). One load of debt too.

Or you can do study something completely different for 3 years, then apply as a graduate (which is more competitive) and go back to uni for another 4 years (or 5 if you don't do the accelerated course). So a longer process, more competitive odds and loads more debt
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Warrior King
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(Original post by A level Az)
Thanks for the link. I was just wondering, why are so many people going for the "Medicine" course (the one with the 15 October deadline) when the same can be achieved studying Biology/Chemistry, as long as you have done the required work to get into Medical school. Am I right in saying that their degree will be the same length as people who do Bio/Chem (3/4 years) and so will be applying for Medical school at around the same time? Or am I mistaken and that Medicine course is what people taking Bio/Chem apply for after 4 years?

I'm a bit confused =/

1) Undergraduate medicine lasts 5 years or 6 if you do an intercalated BSc (compulsory at Oxbridge, UCL and Imperial) whereas graduate medicine would mean at least 7 years of university study and those figures don't take into account post-graduate training.

2) LEA will strictly speaking only fund you for your first degree hence if you decide to do graduate entry Medicine then you have to make sure you have the financial security of funding tuition fees etc.

3) Competition to get onto the standard course is intense whilst it is even more so for the graduate course. There are many graduates out there who for whatever reason decided to come into Medicine later than planned e.g. didn't get the grades at A-level, made a career switch etc. A lot of people know from an early age that they want to study Medicine and get the grades at A-level and go straight into undergraduate Medicine and assuming they went to university at 17/18 that means they could qualify as a GP or Consultant well before their 35th birthday. Now age isn't such a huge factor but for some people, a couple of extra years spent at university could alter "life-plans". If you're certain from a an early point that Medicine is what you want to do then you should just generally go for it rather than taking the long winded route. Also.......

4) With regards to the competition doing a degree and even getting a 1st is by no means a guarantee of getting a place on a 4 year programme. If you solely did a degree like say Biochemistry for the intention of purely studying graduate medicine and God forbid after 3 or 4 years of study you had no offers for Medicine or less than a 2:1 then you are stuck with a degree that perhaps you didn't intend to have a career path with. If you are doing the Biochem degree because you perceive this as an "easier route" into medical school then you are mistaken. To get a 1st or a 2:1 will require a lot of work and depending on where you study you will be in competition with other students in your cohort who may also want to do graduate Medicine, a PHD etc. If you want to do a degree with good career prospects whilst keeping the door open for graduate Medicine then you should consider Pharmacy or Optometry.
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int_applicant
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(Original post by A level Az)
Could someone explain how this would work? 4 years in University for Biochemistry, and then apply for the medical school within the University for the Medicine degree?
By the way, make sure you graduate with at least a 2:1...anything less will diminish your chances of getting in , after your biochemistry degree...
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The Saint Asks
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Pardon me, but does it mean that someone can still go to medical school to get a medical degree after 4 years of reading Biochemistry?!
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FATMANNOLONGER
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(Original post by The Saint Asks)
Pardon me, but does it mean that someone can still go to medical school to get a medical degree after 4 years of reading Biochemistry?!
Read the replies that were posted to the original question
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games211
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(Original post by The Saint Asks)
Pardon me, but does it mean that someone can still go to medical school to get a medical degree after 4 years of reading Biochemistry?!

Hi!

Yes, you are still able to apply for grad medicine after graduating with a 2.1 in biochemistry. Nothing really has changed about entry requirements for grads.

What unis are hoping to apply to?

The above posts are still applicable. Make sure that you are super dedicated to studying Medicine before you apply, grad entry is very competitive for the limited spaces they have. Hope it works out for you.

For more information take a look at this page: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/uni...dicine-a-guide
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