Why is it so difficult to become a lawyer in the UK?

Watch
Teveth
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 9 years ago
#1
3 years of study followed by having to spend a fortune on either the LPC or BVC, before even being able to apply for a two-year training contract (if you are taking the solicitor route), something that is extremely hard to come by.

That's 6 or 7 years from when you start your degree before you become fully qualified, if you're lucky enough to secure a training contract. Why?
1
reply
miike1234
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#2
Report 9 years ago
#2
Because it takes a long time for people to build up the skills required to come up with catchy lines like 'Where there's a blame, there's a claim' and 'No win, no fee'.

That's not a skill you can just learn on a two month course, it takes time and effort.
2
reply
Dr. Manic Mechanic
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#3
Report 9 years ago
#3
Mate, if you become a lawyer, then you practically have powers.

To become a "Chartered Engineer"

Master of Engineering degree (5 years)
3 or 4 years of experience with supervison

Approximately 8 to 9 years to become a "Chartered Engineer"

Hope that helps.........Same goes for Medicine, but it is even longer.
0
reply
nulli tertius
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#4
Report 9 years ago
#4
The time it takes to become a lawyer is comparable with other professions in the UK, has remained fairly constant for 150 years and is comparable with the time taken in other countries.

For example in the US law is a postgraduate discipline so students have generally done a three or four year Arts degree followed by 3 year law degree.
0
reply
Fuzzywuzzymuzzy
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#5
Report 9 years ago
#5
You normally apply for training contracts at the end of your second year at uni and then the firm will fund your LPC (for the solicitor route).
0
reply
No Man
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#6
Report 9 years ago
#6
Because a lot of people want to become lawyers.
0
reply
wizz_kid
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#7
Report 9 years ago
#7
(Original post by Dr. Manic Mechanic)
Mate, if you become a lawyer, then you practically have powers.

To become a "Chartered Engineer"

Master of Engineering degree (5 years)
3 or 4 years of experience with supervison

Approximately 8 to 9 years to become a "Chartered Engineer"

Hope that helps.........Same goes for Medicine, but it is even longer.

To expand on what this guy said, to become a Chartered Professional, you have to sacrifice about 7+ years of your life.
1
reply
TimmonaPortella
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#8
Report 9 years ago
#8
(Original post by Teveth)
3 years of study followed by having to spend a fortune on either the LPC or BVC, before even being able to apply for a two-year training contract (if you are taking the solicitor route), something that is extremely hard to come by.

That's 6 or 7 years from when you start your degree before you become fully qualified, if you're lucky enough to secure a training contract. Why?
I don't know, but I'm sure you'll find some way to blame it on capitalism.
0
reply
Aj12
  • Political Ambassador
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#9
Report 9 years ago
#9
Because Law is hardly an easy profession. Would you trust a doctor who only trained for 3 years?
2
reply
Deadlifts
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#10
Report 9 years ago
#10
(Original post by Fuzzywuzzymuzzy)
You normally apply for training contracts at the end of your second year at uni and then the firm will fund your LPC (for the solicitor route).
Only if you get a training contract for a big firm. Most people fund themselves and either have a training contract at a smaller firm or try and get one later.
0
reply
jacketpotato
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#11
Report 9 years ago
#11
Most good graduate jobs require a degree, this is standard.

Trainees get paid a full salary, sure there is some training involved but you are basically working.

The only extra study really is the year on the LPC/BVC (plus 1 year on the GDL for people who didn't take a law degree). This is nothing compared to the subject-specific study that has to be done by medics/engineers and is very little compared to the study that has to be done in some jurisdictions (the fact that the JD is a 4/5-year post-graduate course in the U.S. comes to mind).
0
reply
Tanya_Dzirigorova
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#12
Report 9 years ago
#12
It is difficult to become a lawyer anywhere in the world, not only in the UK.
0
reply
eve_22
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#13
Report 9 years ago
#13
From my perspective, the competition is very fierce in the UK, thus it it very hard to become a lawyer in the UK in that respect. However, the qualification process isn't any harder or any longer than in other parts of the world. As a matter of fact, in my home country, a law degree lasts a whole five years, and then an individual is required to do a Masters for another couple of years, followed by the so called traineeship alongside a qualified lawyer for another few years after that.
0
reply
Juneau
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#14
Report 9 years ago
#14
(Original post by jacketpotato)
Most good graduate jobs require a degree, this is standard.

Trainees get paid a full salary, sure there is some training involved but you are basically working.

The only extra study really is the year on the LPC/BVC (plus 1 year on the GDL for people who didn't take a law degree). This is nothing compared to the subject-specific study that has to be done by medics/engineers and is very little compared to the study that has to be done in some jurisdictions (the fact that the JD is a 4/5-year post-graduate course in the U.S. comes to mind).
Just to clarify this, the JD is in fact 3 years long. The route to qualification in the US therefore takes minimum 7 years (4 year undergraduate degrees) versus minimum 6 in the UK. The big difference obviously being (like you point out) that in the UK you're actually working for two of those years instead of paying law school fees of c. 45,000USD. The salaries are, however, higher for NQs at large law firms in the US than at City firms in the UK. To quite a large extent though this is because of the far greater debt burden that most US lawyers have in comparison to their UK counterparts.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

How are you feeling ahead of starting University?

I am excited and looking forward to starting (37)
13.96%
I am excited but have some apprehension around Covid-19 measures (37)
13.96%
I am concerned I will miss out on aspects of the uni experience due to new measures (90)
33.96%
I am concerned the Covid-19 measures at uni are not strong enough (27)
10.19%
I am nervous and feel I don't have enough information (60)
22.64%
Something else (let us know in the thread!) (14)
5.28%

Watched Threads

View All