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onearmedscissor
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#21
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#21
(Original post by hornblower)
That web site is pretty good...

J.
It also taught you (I hope) to research something before you run off at the mouth about elitist Universities.
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hornblower
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#22
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#22
(Original post by onearmedscissor)
It also taught you (I hope) to research something before you run off at the mouth about elitist Universities.
Indeed. Thank you .

J.
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BossLady
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#23
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#23
(Original post by J.S.)
You're wrong there
Am *so* not!

(maybe i was a lil bit harsh, but the general theme still stands, as in tis a great uni, but im just not sure it is as good as it once was, it has been overtaken by some of the others)
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Mark_KK
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#24
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#24
(Original post by cherub_rock)
Hey there you bunch of lovelies!
I was just wondering, I know certain employers find it preferable to employ someone from a red brick university. I was just wondering-other than cambridge and oxford and liverpool (the "original" red brick university, coining the phrase)....
where the hell are the others?!
If you could let me know I would like to know as Im compiling a list.
....for
....myself.
I know I should know already. Sorry-I'm not a uni basher.
xx:-)xxx:-)xxxx:-)xxxxx:-)xxxxx:-)xxxxx:-)xxxxx:-)
A Red Brick uni is not what many people think it is -

There are three main types of uni - Traditional (Oxford, Cambridge, Durham and one or two others) Red Brick (Leeds, Manchester, Southampton, Birmingham, Lancaster, Newcastle, Liverpool, Hull and about 40 others) and then you have the old polytechnics (Leeds Met, Sheffield Hallam, Salford, Nottingham Trent and loads more. You then have some colleges that offer a degree programme usually in association with one of the universities. These are often refered to as higher education colleges.

The reason that the traditional and red brick unis are often regarded higher is as a general rule they have higher entry requirements then polytechnics and higher education colleges. There are exceptions to this rule wher you can get into somewhere like Manchester with two c's and a d on one of their undersuscribed courses.
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AT82
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#25
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#25
(Original post by Mark_KK)
A Red Brick uni is not what many people think it is -

There are three main types of uni - Traditional (Oxford, Cambridge, Durham and one or two others) Red Brick (Leeds, Manchester, Southampton, Birmingham, Lancaster, Newcastle, Liverpool, Hull and about 40 others) and then you have the old polytechnics (Leeds Met, Sheffield Hallam, Salford, Nottingham Trent and loads more. You then have some colleges that offer a degree programme usually in association with one of the universities. These are often refered to as higher education colleges.

The reason that the traditional and red brick unis are often regarded higher is as a general rule they have higher entry requirements then polytechnics and higher education colleges. There are exceptions to this rule wher you can get into somewhere like Manchester with two c's and a d on one of their undersuscribed courses.
Salford is not a polytechnic. It got its royal university charter in 1967 which makes it almost as old as York. Polytechnics became universities in 1992.
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serendipity
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#26
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#26
Birmingham was established in 1900
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serendipity
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#27
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#27
(Original post by Pencil Queen)
Umm...not one of those is an original redbrick...and redbricks weren't the 60's charter uni's they were the 1850s-1920 unis...big civic uni's modelled on UCL.

Please read the definition: http://en2.wikipedia.org/wiki/Redbrick

And Oxbridge+durham are traditional universities but so are York Warwick and Bath and Sussex....the 3 oldest uni's are referred to as the ancient uni's if they have any collective name.
i thought warwick was built in the 1960s? If so then how can it be traditional?
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AT82
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#28
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#28
(Original post by serendipity)
Birmingham was established in 1900
As a higher education college or a university? Salford was established as a higher engineering college in 1896 I think as apart of Peel's gifts for the area.

Manchester Victoria University got its satus in 1903. This was Owens College before hand.
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AT82
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#29
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#29
(Original post by serendipity)
i thought warwick was built in the 1960s? If so then how can it be traditional?
Any university before 1992 is basicaly classed as Traditional. If its not an ex poly its a traditional university.
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Mark_KK
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#30
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#30
(Original post by amazingtrade)
Salford is not a polytechnic. It got its royal university charter in 1967 which makes it almost as old as York. Polytechnics became universities in 1992.
Sorry about that...for some reason I have always seen it as a lesser relation to the two other Manchester Universities and thus thought that it was a poly (and yes I know that Manchester Metropolitan is a converted poly).
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AT82
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#31
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#31
(Original post by Mark_KK)
Sorry about that...for some reason I have always seen it as a lesser relation to the two other Manchester Universities and thus thought that it was a poly (and yes I know that Manchester Metropolitan is a converted poly).
Yes Salford is a lesser relation to the Manchester unis. I think one of Salford's big problems is outsiders would rather go to a Manchester titled university. The City of Salford is not as well known as the City of Manchester even though Salford shares its borders with Manchester city centre.

For this reason Salford finds it harder to attract the good students which does effect standards. Salford should see a raise in a league tables soon due to a lot of resturcturing and and a lot of the old 3 star departments have been merged with 5 star ones.

I think all the unviristies in Manchester including the Met are of a pretty good standard all these degrees will be respected. I think the only weak one is probably Bolton Insitute.
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as1
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#32
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#32
(Original post by serendipity)
i thought warwick was built in the 1960s? If so then how can it be traditional?
Warwick was built (I believe) before WW2 and got bombed during the war and had to be mostly re-built, hence alot of confusion!
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hornblower
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#33
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#33
(Original post by as1)
Warwick was built (I believe) before WW2 and got bombed during the war and had to be mostly re-built, hence alot of confusion!
I think the university was built in the 60's. Didn't Warwick receive its Royal Charter, i.e. become a university, in 1965?

J.
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mama_corleone
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#34
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#34
whoever said* something about oxbridge and durham, durham isn't classed as one of the ancient ones at all. there's oxbridge then 4 of the scottish ones, ie. st andrews, edinburgh. all of em are pre-1600, and bloody good unis as well. it's worth realising scotland established 4 stunning unis in 200 odd years, when for most of it's educational history england only had the two. durham's fairly new in comparison.

*couldn't be bothered to scroll/quote.
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