reapplying if missing grades Watch

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musicbloke
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#1
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I have been offered a place at robinson AAA. if I miss the grades do you think they would object to me reapplying to Robinson. It was not my first choice this year but I was pooled there and really like it.

Musicboy
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username9816
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(Original post by musicboy)
I have been offered a place at robinson AAA. if I miss the grades do you think they would object to me reapplying to Robinson. It was not my first choice this year but I was pooled there and really like it.

Musicboy
just get the grades and go this time round. simple.
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fred86
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(Original post by musicboy)
I have been offered a place at robinson AAA. if I miss the grades do you think they would object to me reapplying to Robinson. It was not my first choice this year but I was pooled there and really like it.

Musicboy
yeh lol, cambridge want aaa this year, not aaa that u acheived by some re-sits. get over it - it's not the be all and end all to life, if u don't get the grades - unless u have a good reason you're probly not cam material!
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Adhsur
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It may be possible because colleges often give allowances to very few applicants who miss out on grades, and there is also the chance of being taken from the summer pool.

However, if I was you I would definitely not risk it! I'd work really really hard to ensure I got my grades. I can't imagine how bad people will feel to not be able to go after even going as far getting an offer. My advice would be to prevent the heartbreak, try very hard, and hope for the best!
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musicbloke
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thanks for the advice. The main problem for me is y philosophy A-level. It is very difficult to tell if we are learning the correct stuff. There is only one teacher and the specifications are quite vague. Last year I had one exam where half the stuff that came up we hadn't been taught. What happens if the same happens again this year - my school wouldn't in a million years send a letter to cambridge accepting their responsibility for my failure.

Musicboy
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Alexander
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If your parents are well-monied then maybe you could have a few lessons with a private tutor? Also make sure that you have a copy of the full syllabus.... and discuss worries with your teacher.
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musicbloke
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(Original post by Alexander)
If your parents are well-monied then maybe you could have a few lessons with a private tutor? Also make sure that you have a copy of the full syllabus.... and discuss worries with your teacher.
Thanks for the advice alexander. The problem is that the spec for philosophy is so brief. There is a one paragraph specification for an hour long exam on aristotle's nicomachean ethics. What a joke - people have written whole books trying to analyse it.

Musicboy
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Adhsur
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(Original post by musicboy)
thanks for the advice. The main problem for me is y philosophy A-level. It is very difficult to tell if we are learning the correct stuff. There is only one teacher and the specifications are quite vague. Last year I had one exam where half the stuff that came up we hadn't been taught. What happens if the same happens again this year - my school wouldn't in a million years send a letter to cambridge accepting their responsibility for my failure.

Musicboy
I think with philosophy, a lot of personal reading can be done around the subject. We have the worst teacher ever - he is currently spending four weeks on the difference between a person and a self...and that's in a philosophy of science module!! Erm...
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musicbloke
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(Original post by Adhsur)
I think with philosophy, a lot of personal reading can be done around the subject. We have the worst teacher ever - he is currently spending four weeks on the difference between a person and a self...and that's in a philosophy of science module!! Erm...
If he's doing the aqa spec then he's misread it. The person and the self distinction comes under the philosophy of mind module.
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Adhsur
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(Original post by musicboy)
If he's doing the aqa spec then he's misread it. The person and the self distinction comes under the philosophy of mind module.
No it's not even that. He's talking about a narrative self and spiritual development. Why oh why did my school let an RS teacher teach philosophy?

Hehehe it's funny, last year the three modules:

Epistemology - self taught, got an A
Religion - self taught, got an A
Sartre - relied on him and his notes, got a D.

Now, if only Cambridge had known that I haven't been taught the subject at all - they probably think I had! heheh ah well.
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Lurker
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(Original post by Adhsur)
No it's not even that. He's talking about a narrative self and spiritual development. Why oh why did my school let an RS teacher teach philosophy?

Hehehe it's funny, last year the three modules:

Epistemology - self taught, got an A
Religion - self taught, got an A
Sartre - relied on him and his notes, got a D.

Now, if only Cambridge had known that I haven't been taught the subject at all - they probably think I had! heheh ah well.
Hehe. In the worst teacher competition, how about my RS teacher, who spent our Ethics module reading out bits of the Bible for us to copy down. Every lesson! I ended up more or less teaching the whole module to myself and got an A, but I think my other modules suffered a bit because of all the extra time I spent on that. He got fired.
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Adhsur
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(Original post by Lurker)
Hehe. In the worst teacher competition, how about my RS teacher, who spent our Ethics module reading out bits of the Bible for us to copy down. Every lesson! I ended up more or less teaching the whole module to myself and got an A, but I think my other modules suffered a bit because of all the extra time I spent on that. He got fired.
Hehehe it's good that he did! I hope mine gets fired...
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llama boy
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I feel very sorry for those of you with poor philosophy teachers...it isn't something that is easily learnt independently (like for eg, computing, which i learnt entirely from the revision book last year).

I'm lucky enough to have a brilliant philosophy teacher that gives us great lessons and notes.

If anyone wants some of the notes (in Word format) for any of Ethics/Theory of Knowledge/Hume/Political for the AQA syllabus then by all means PM me.

All I had to do for the AS was to memorise a few of the arguments on each handout and I ended up with full marks.
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Hedgie
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(Original post by musicboy)
I have been offered a place at robinson AAA. if I miss the grades do you think they would object to me reapplying to Robinson. It was not my first choice this year but I was pooled there and really like it.

Musicboy
Musicboy - I know this is now an old post, but, as i have a friend wanting to apply for music, I just wondered which college you originally applied to, whether in your opinion colleges like Clare and Kings are really hard to get in for music (we've heard they are). Is it the case that lots of musicians at those 2 colleges are ex-NYO? Also are there any colleges you didn't like the look of for music?
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Helenia
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(Original post by Hedgie)
Musicboy - I know this is now an old post, but, as i have a friend wanting to apply for music, I just wondered which college you originally applied to, whether in your opinion colleges like Clare and Kings are really hard to get in for music (we've heard they are). Is it the case that lots of musicians at those 2 colleges are ex-NYO? Also are there any colleges you didn't like the look of for music?
That is true for Clare; not so sure about King's. Aside from the choir (which is all male and only has 14 members of university age - and not all of them are King's students!), you don't hear much about King's, musically.
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ot209
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King's is as competitive for music as it is for most subjects, which means above average. However it also has a good reputation for the subject. There are singular choral-scolars with ridiculous musical backgrounds around, but there are also 'normal' students who are comparatively talented but more relevantly just interested. In at least two cases I've met, the stereotype of distanced music students playing fugues to themselves in their rooms is not true in King's.
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musicbloke
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(Original post by Hedgie)
Musicboy - I know this is now an old post, but, as i have a friend wanting to apply for music, I just wondered which college you originally applied to, whether in your opinion colleges like Clare and Kings are really hard to get in for music (we've heard they are). Is it the case that lots of musicians at those 2 colleges are ex-NYO? Also are there any colleges you didn't like the look of for music?
I did the stupid thing of applying to Selwyn for music which it tiurns out this year was the most oversubscribed for that subject. I also heard from a few people that the DoS atselwyn was not very nice - this was proved at the interview when he was rude to me and didn't listen to anything I said. I was then pooled to girton and robinson. Both were very nice. In general it is thought that clare is the hardest to get in for music. It has an amazing reputation but to be honest because music is such a small subject thereis not really a difference in how many academics there are for each colleg - usually only one or two. As for Kings, Nicholas cleobury is there and he's supposed to be a really nice guy but kings is very tough to get into for all subjects. Unless you are supremely confident in your abilities then I would not advise applying to these colleges. Remember the course is the same whichever college you study in.

Musicboy
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RxB
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(Original post by ot209)
King's is as competitive for music as it is for most subjects, which means above average. However it also has a good reputation for the subject. There are singular choral-scolars with ridiculous musical backgrounds around, but there are also 'normal' students who are comparatively talented but more relevantly just interested. In at least two cases I've met, the stereotype of distanced music students playing fugues to themselves in their rooms is not true in King's.
One of my friends has a choral scholarship for October 2005, and he only started having musical tuition about 2 years ago, and he's remarkably normal. Don't know if he's an exception, though.
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