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What is the difference between an orbital, a shell and a sub-shell? Watch

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    Very confused.
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    Well an obital is the same as a shell. These come in circles but we find that these circles can be ellipses. These sub-shells are the ellipses in the shells.
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    Shell - the highest way of classing an electron, contains many subshells. Labelled with 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 etc.

    Subshell - a group of orbitals with particular properties like shape and angular momentum. Labelled s, p, d, f, g etc.

    Orbital - can contain up to two electrons and has a particular shape and orientation.

    e.g. 2p_z is the z-aligned orbital in the p subshell in the second shell.
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    (Original post by Kyle_S-C)
    Shell - the highest way of classing an electron, contains many subshells. Labelled with 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 etc.

    Subshell - a group of orbitals with particular properties like shape and angular momentum. Labelled s, p, d, f, g etc.

    Orbital - can contain up to two electrons and has a particular shape and orientation.

    e.g. 2p_z is the z-aligned orbital in the p subshell in the second shell.
    So the number is the shell? Letter is subshell? what is the orbital, the whole thing?????
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    (Original post by Sani-Insanity)
    So the number is the shell? Letter is subshell? what is the orbital, the whole thing?????
    Yeah, that's right. Just like a particular address can be in a country and a specific town. The country is like the shell, the town is like the subshell and the whole address is the orbital.
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    an orbital is an area where there is a 95% chance of finding an electron
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    (Original post by Kyle_S-C)
    Shell - the highest way of classing an electron, contains many subshells. Labelled with 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 etc.

    Subshell - a group of orbitals with particular properties like shape and angular momentum. Labelled s, p, d, f, g etc.

    Orbital - can contain up to two electrons and has a particular shape and orientation.

    e.g. 2p_z is the z-aligned orbital in the p subshell in the second shell.
    azimuthal quantum number determines the orbital the electron is in , thus 2s,2pis the orbital? So when you say p sub shell has three orbitals - Px,Pz,Py, how do you explain the former ?
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    (Original post by soup)
    Well an obital is the same as a shell. These come in circles but we find that these circles can be ellipses. These sub-shells are the ellipses in the shells.
    Err... no. That's not correct

    (Original post by ria309)
    azimuthal quantum number determines the orbital the electron is in , thus 2s,2pis the orbital? So when you say p sub shell has three orbitals - Px,Pz,Py, how do you explain the former ?
    not quite sure what your question is here.

    Kyle_S-C has basically explained it all.

    The "shell" is the principal quantum number and has the same number as the period in the periodic table in which that shell is being filled. So the first period (H and He) is filling shell no 1, the second period (Li, Be etc) is filling shell no 2 and so on.

    Within each shell you have orbitals s, p, d, etc There is one s-orbital per shell, three p-orbitals per shell, five d-orbitals per shell and so on. Each orbital can hold up to a pair of electrons.

    What the orbital is (at least for A level purposes) is really just a region of space of a certain shape where you are most likely to find the electron(s) it contains. In the case of the s-orbital, that's basically a hollow sphere centred on the nucleus. In the case of the p-orbitals, they look a bit like dumbells aligned along the x-, y- and z-axis with the nucleus at the origin. The shapes of the d and higher orbitals are a bit more involved, but you don't need to know that for A level


    (btw - in case you're wondering why they are given the letters s,p,d,f etc - it dates back to the early days of spectroscopy and the experimental appearance of the spectral patterns arising from transitions to those orbitals "sharp" "principal" "diffuse" "fundamental")


    (Original post by Sani-Insanity)
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    (Original post by Plato's Trousers)
    Err... no. That's not correct



    not quite sure what your question is here.

    Kyle_S-C has basically explained it all.

    The "shell" is the principal quantum number and has the same number as the period in the periodic table in which that shell is being filled. So the first period (H and He) is filling shell no 1, the second period (Li, Be etc) is filling shell no 2 and so on.

    Within each shell you have orbitals s, p, d, etc There is one s-orbital per shell, three p-orbitals per shell, five d-orbitals per shell and so on. Each orbital can hold up to a pair of electrons.

    What the orbital is (at least for A level purposes) is really just a region of space of a certain shape where you are most likely to find the electron(s) it contains. In the case of the s-orbital, that's basically a sphere centred on the nucleus. In the case of the p-orbitals, they look a bit like dumbells aligned along the x-, y- and z-axis with the nucleus at the origin. The shapes of the d and higher orbitals are a bit more involved, but you don't need to know that for A level


    (btw - in case you're wondering why they are given the letters s,p,d,f etc - it dates back to the early days of spectroscopy and the experimental appearance of the spectral patterns arising from transitions to those orbitals "sharp" "principal" "diffuse" "fundamental")
    Thanks ! made it much clearer and simple for me .
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    Please don't bump threads form years ago
 
 
 
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