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    Physics and Maths are the subjects I love in GCSE. Physics is like my passion, it is the one subject that I do extra research on and I even wrote a few articles on it. I'm predicted 11 A*'s in GCSE's so instead of taking 4 AS Levels I want to differentiate myself and take 6 AS Levels.

    Physics
    Maths
    Further Maths
    Chemistry
    English Language or Literature
    Economics

    Would those be good subject choices for studying Physics in the future as a undergraduate in university?
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    I'm only a Physics Uni applicant, so I'm not sure how useful my opinion would be to you, but I think that the first four subjects you have chosen would be extremely relevant, however I don't really see how English or Economics would help you in a Physics application. They may give a great span of subjects in all the core areas, but perhaps it would be better if you focused on gaining as close to 100% as possible in the four most relevant subjects? You are obviously intelligent, however maybe you shouldn't spread yourself too thin, try picking up extra-curricular stuff instead of more AS-levels? Hope I've been a little helpful

    Oh btw, Physics A-level is AWESOME!!! :awesome:
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    IMO you should take 5; 6 is a lot of (unnecessary) work, and though you could feasibly get 6 good As you would probably have to resort to rote learning for a lot of it, not having time to gain any real understanding.
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    (Original post by aliakhtar)
    Physics and Maths are the subjects I love in GCSE. Physics is like my passion, it is the one subject that I do extra research on and I even wrote a few articles on it. I'm predicted 11 A*'s in GCSE's so instead of taking 4 AS Levels I want to differentiate myself and take 6 AS Levels.

    Physics
    Maths
    Further Maths
    Chemistry
    English Language or Literature
    Economics

    Would those be good subject choices for studying Physics in the future as a undergraduate in university?
    You can differentiate yourself by doing further reading/AEA/STEP/extra Mechanics modules??! :dontknow:

    I don't think doing 6 AS levels would make any positive difference to your application tbh.
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    (Original post by aliakhtar)
    Physics and Maths are the subjects I love in GCSE. Physics is like my passion, it is the one subject that I do extra research on and I even wrote a few articles on it. I'm predicted 11 A*'s in GCSE's so instead of taking 4 AS Levels I want to differentiate myself and take 6 AS Levels.

    Physics
    Maths
    Further Maths
    Chemistry
    English Language or Literature
    Economics

    Would those be good subject choices for studying Physics in the future as a undergraduate in university?
    Have you actually asked your 6th form or college if they will let you do 6? I can't see it happening tbh, that is alot of work people find it hard to do 4/5.

    As for subjects to take physics, Physics and Maths are a must and further maths would be a major plus.

    As for your 4th and 5th options it actually probably wont make too much difference what you take. Also long as its something you are going to enjoy and want to work at you'll be fine.

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    You do NOT need 6. At all. I'm doing 4 A levels and I have an interview for physical science (they don't offer Physics) at Cambridge with worse GCSEs than your prediction. 6 AS levels will be detrimental to your studying whilst barely strengthening your application. You only need maths, further maths and physics. Chemistry would strengthen your application. The other 2 are basically worthless.

    h
    (Original post by Azzie_May)
    Oh btw, Physics A-level is AWESOME!!! :awesome:
    I'm inclined to disagree... the mechanics modules in maths are awesome, A level physics is dumbed down like hell
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    You can differentiate yourself by doing further reading/AEA/STEP/extra Mechanics modules??! :dontknow:

    I don't think doing 6 AS levels would make any positive difference to your application tbh.
    This.

    Also I got 12A* at GCSE and don't think I'd have done well in 6 A levels. Getting good grades an A level is totally different to doing well in GCSE. Just concentrate on 4 ASs (5 if you must); doing well in them will be enough.
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    (Original post by aliakhtar)
    Physics and Maths are the subjects I love in GCSE. Physics is like my passion, it is the one subject that I do extra research on and I even wrote a few articles on it. I'm predicted 11 A*'s in GCSE's so instead of taking 4 AS Levels I want to differentiate myself and take 6 AS Levels.

    Physics
    Maths
    Further Maths
    Chemistry
    English Language or Literature
    Economics

    Would those be good subject choices for studying Physics in the future as a undergraduate in university?
    Sensible choices, but imo unless you really like the sound of Economics/English I'd switch one for Philosophy (simply because the links between some philosophical arguments and science are very interesting). All are essay type subjects anyway.

    As other people have said you won't need 6 at all (sure it shows that you can do 6 A levels... fair enough... but unis see that 3 A levels with 1 AS is fine.) I think you should concentrate on 5 AS if you really want to do more than 4; take 4 to A level if you really want more than 3; without the 6th one you'll have more time to do some extra reading or find some work experience.

    6 just sounds stressful and unnecessary to me... 3 A* predictions (and really high raw marks) is considered more than enough already - especially in subjects like Maths/FM/Physics.


    All that said, people get into the top unis with fewer than 11 A*s and at/below just 3A predictions.

    If you're that good, they'll want you anyway.
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    There is no use in taking 6 as levels because it will not strengthen your application but will reduce time for potential work experience which is very important. I take 4 a-levels and spend on average 10 hours a day on college work ( hws,courseworks,tests).
    I have barely any time for thorough daily revision which I would like to do.
    I think 5 as in the first year and 4 alevels in the second is good as well as work experience.
    Finally, a word of advice: the second year is where it becomes much tougher.
    Exams are harder, teachers are more stringent and much of your time is required to take uni entry exams, attend interviews, open days.
    So sort out everything quickly at the beginning of the second year and hit the floor running.
    Good luck.
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    Yeah, don't take 6. Take 5 if you must. Do lots of extra reading instead. They want top UMS more than lots of A levels.
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    Taking six will be suicidal

    Take the standard of 4, and make sure you get excellent grades in these i reccomend the first four
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    Take 4 or 5 max. I did 5 at AS and 4 at A level. With 6 A levels there would be no way for you to have a social life, or do many extra curriculum activities like others have pointed out. After all it is a good time to spend lots of time with your friends, do fun stuff, and enjoy a bit of freedom after GCSEs
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    (Original post by aliakhtar)
    Physics and Maths are the subjects I love in GCSE. Physics is like my passion, it is the one subject that I do extra research on and I even wrote a few articles on it. I'm predicted 11 A*'s in GCSE's so instead of taking 4 AS Levels I want to differentiate myself and take 6 AS Levels.

    Physics
    Maths
    Further Maths
    Chemistry
    English Language or Literature
    Economics

    Would those be good subject choices for studying Physics in the future as a undergraduate in university?
    Economics and English totally irrelevant.

    I took 5 at AS and A level if you exclude gen. studies and critical thinking (not sure you should exclude crit. thinking, but most people do) and I'm fairly certain doing 6 would be silly - the admissions tutors basically don't care if you've done 3 or 8...one of my friends here got in and came 18th in the rankings with maths, physics, government politics and critical thinking...and his offer included critical thinking.

    I did 4 maths/sciences and history - I liked having something arty, and it helps to show you're an all rounder I think....but 2 would be irrelevant.

    Definitely better ways to differentiate yourself - doing really well in 3 or 4 would be better I think. I'm not even sure how relevant physics a level is, its been literally no use to date.
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    AS doesn't really mean anything. 6 AS would be less impressive than the standard 4 AS level candidate not dropping any and achieveing 4 A-levels.

    Personally I took 5 AS levels but that's because Further Maths was run outside my Sixth Form by an external party over 2 years rather than as a normal AS on my Sixth Form timetable. I dropped one other AS meaning I had 3 A-levels.

    I got 5/5 offers from uni so that was fine. If I wanted to go to Oxbridge or somewhere it would have been obvious by the time I finished my AS and I probably wouldn't have dropped the AS (or in actuality taken up another AS as my 6th form discontinued the subject at the end of the 1st year, was the one I would of dropped anyway) or I would have gotten 3 amazing A*s which would have been easily enough because if I was an Oxbridge candidate I could of.

    You're better off focussing your energy on 3 A levels and blitzing them with great grades. A* at GCSE doesn't mean anything btw don't think you're above all this and dive in too deep (don't spread yourself too thin and then mess up with information overload, cos if you do thats the grades the universities you're applying to will be seeing). Take 5 AS if you want and then you can decide which to drop and continue with your favourite 3 as the first year is really just a warmup. If you focus your enegry on Physics and get an A* at A-level with 2 A's in other A-levels, and also have a Further Maths AS under your belt with another AS, combined with a good personal statement you could get into anywhere even with 4 AS's you could easily
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    Thanks everyone for the reply's

    Well in the future I will either go into Science or Economics. In Science I would like study something to do with Physics in the future. I don't want to take Business Studies as an AS/A-Level because I heard it's blacklisted and regarded as a weak subject by most universities. The only reason I want English as an AS/A-Level is because I want to improve on the language further so it will help me communicate well and also help me with coursework on other subjects. Would it be okay if I did AS English then dropped it and went on to do 5 A-Levels : Physics, Chemistry, Maths, Further Maths and Economics.

    If I manage to excel in the 6 AS and 5 A-Level and manage to get all A* (what I always aim for), does it stand me a good chance to get into Oxbridge? I mean having 5 A-Levels rather than 3 A-Levels would obviously give me preference right? Also, what else do Universities require to get in? What kind of Work Experience am I required to do and should I do extra research on a topic I prefer? Maybe come up with a theory or start my own mini-business?
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    (Original post by insoms)
    You're better off focussing your energy on 3 A levels and blitzing them with great grades. A* at GCSE doesn't mean anything btw don't think you're above all this and dive in too deep (don't spread yourself too thin and then mess up with information overload, cos if you do thats the grades the universities you're applying to will be seeing). Take 5 AS if you want and then you can decide which to drop and continue with your favourite 3 as the first year is really just a warmup. If you focus your enegry on Physics and get an A* at A-level with 2 A's in other A-levels, and also have a Further Maths AS under your belt with another AS, combined with a good personal statement you could get into anywhere even with 4 AS's you could easily
    Not really the best advice to take. Focus on maths. Imperial won't take you without an A* in maths - their offer is A* maths, A physics, A in another. Kind shows that A level physics isn't the one they care about most.


    (Original post by aliakhtar)
    Thanks everyone for the reply's

    Well in the future I will either go into Science or Economics. In Science I would like study something to do with Physics in the future. I don't want to take Business Studies as an AS/A-Level because I heard it's blacklisted and regarded as a weak subject by most universities. The only reason I want English as an AS/A-Level is because I want to improve on the language further so it will help me communicate well and also help me with coursework on other subjects. Would it be okay if I did AS English then dropped it and went on to do 5 A-Levels : Physics, Chemistry, Maths, Further Maths and Economics.

    If I manage to excel in the 6 AS and 5 A-Level and manage to get all A* (what I always aim for), does it stand me a good chance to get into Oxbridge? I mean having 5 A-Levels rather than 3 A-Levels would obviously give me preference right? Also, what else do Universities require to get in? What kind of Work Experience am I required to do and should I do extra research on a topic I prefer? Maybe come up with a theory or start my own mini-business?
    Taking 5 A levels won't boost you by that much, and it also means that Oxbridge might end up making a nasty, nasty offer... if you take 4, you're doing more than enough and avoiding being asked for stupid grades. I'm doing Maths, Further Maths, Physics and Chemistry and I have 4 offers and an interview at Cambridge, so I'd say don't bother with economics and take English AS (I took French AS and am doing 4 A2s). Besides, Economics is a "blacklisted" subject and isn't going to do anything other than drain revision time.

    Also, don't presume that because you can get A*s at GCSE, you can at A level. They're very different. I dossed and got 5 A*s at GCSE and am predicted 4 A*s at A Level; a girl from my school got 10 A*s and is predicted A*AAB at A level.
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    (Original post by OS92)
    Not really the best advice to take. Focus on maths. Imperial won't take you without an A* in maths - their offer is A* maths, A physics, A in another. Kind shows that A level physics isn't the one they care about most.




    Taking 5 A levels won't boost you by that much, and it also means that Oxbridge might end up making a nasty, nasty offer... if you take 4, you're doing more than enough and avoiding being asked for stupid grades. I'm doing Maths, Further Maths, Physics and Chemistry and I have 4 offers and an interview at Cambridge, so I'd say don't bother with economics and take English AS (I took French AS and am doing 4 A2s). Besides, Economics is a "blacklisted" subject and isn't going to do anything other than drain revision time.

    Also, don't presume that because you can get A*s at GCSE, you can at A level. They're very different. I dossed and got 5 A*s at GCSE and am predicted 4 A*s at A Level; a girl from my school got 10 A*s and is predicted A*AAB at A level.
    Thanks for the answer. Why is Economics blacklisted? I thought it has huge demand in Universities right now? Also, will there be a lot of demand for Physics related courses in the future?
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    If you're certain that you want to study physics, English and economics probably aren't particularly relevant so there is little point in taking them. Universities are unlikely to care that you subjected yourself to a much greater workload so I cannot see why you would want to take six AS levels. A much better use of your time will be reading in to physics more deeply.

    Physics at GCSE (especially) and AS/A-level is very trivial compared to the sort of things you will be covering during the course of a physics degree. Reading more advanced physics books will help you to decide whether you're really cut out for physics as well as developing your knowledge of the field. There are loads of brilliant books out there - far too many to list. I would advise you to find an area within physics that you're particularly interested in and get some books that relate to it. To further develop your knowledge of physics, I would advise you to go to http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/audio-video-courses/#physics which is MIT's Open Courseware website. A lot of physics lectures have been published online; in particular Walter Lewin's lectures on physics are very good and some of the classical mechanics may prove useful when you tackle the mechanics modules of AS level maths.

    As for the work experience, it isn't essential for physics in the same way it is for subjects such as medicine so if you can't get anything relevant, there's no need to worry too much. You may want to research Nuffield Bursaries for Physics which are grants that give you the opportunity to carry out some research in the summer between your AS and A2 years. Doing something like this would show genuine interest for the subject and that can only be a good thing. If you have any contacts or teachers that could help you with the opportunity of getting involved with research, it's definitely a good idea to arrange something to do during your AS level year.

    I think that's about all of the advise I can give you other than the obvious "don't get complacent and flunk your GCSE exams" and "don't get complacent and lazy during your time at sixth form/college either".
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    (Original post by dstevens)
    If you're certain that you want to study physics, English and economics probably aren't particularly relevant so there is little point in taking them. Universities are unlikely to care that you subjected yourself to a much greater workload so I cannot see why you would want to take six AS levels. A much better use of your time will be reading in to physics more deeply.

    Physics at GCSE (especially) and AS/A-level is very trivial compared to the sort of things you will be covering during the course of a physics degree. Reading more advanced physics books will help you to decide whether you're really cut out for physics as well as developing your knowledge of the field. There are loads of brilliant books out there - far too many to list. I would advise you to find an area within physics that you're particularly interested in and get some books that relate to it. To further develop your knowledge of physics, I would advise you to go to http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/audio-video-courses/#physics which is MIT's Open Courseware website. A lot of physics lectures have been published online; in particular Walter Lewin's lectures on physics are very good and some of the classical mechanics may prove useful when you tackle the mechanics modules of AS level maths.

    As for the work experience, it isn't essential for physics in the same way it is for subjects such as medicine so if you can't get anything relevant, there's no need to worry too much. You may want to research Nuffield Bursaries for Physics which are grants that give you the opportunity to carry out some research in the summer between your AS and A2 years. Doing something like this would show genuine interest for the subject and that can only be a good thing. If you have any contacts or teachers that could help you with the opportunity of getting involved with research, it's definitely a good idea to arrange something to do during your AS level year.

    I think that's about all of the advise I can give you other than the obvious "don't get complacent and flunk your GCSE exams" and "don't get complacent and lazy during your time at sixth form/college either".
    Wow, that is some brilliant advice! Thank you so much Right now, I'm trying to understand the concept of String Theory. I was watching this on Youtube :

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4BRhj...eature=related

    That's the ninth part but there are others. What are your thoughts about it?


    Well the area that most interests me is particle physics. What about you? Have you done a Physics degree? If yes, then where did you do it?
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    (Original post by aliakhtar)
    Thanks for the answer. Why is Economics blacklisted? I thought it has huge demand in Universities right now? Also, will there be a lot of demand for Physics related courses in the future?
    My mistake, it's not blacklisted, but it's still not useful for a physics degree. It's not that it's a bad subject, but if you want to do economics at uni, you'll need maths first and foremost, and economics will be quite useful. This list tells you what Trinity (and pretty much all Oxbridge colleges) like to see. Economics isn't on the sciences list - it's OK for arts students, but you can see that for science they really just want science and maths. If you have those, you've as good a chance as anyone. Having extras like economics won't make you any better as a science student and so don't really set you apart from the crowd. All you are going to do is harm your other studies, in reality. You're definitely better off with A*AAA than AAAAA, seeing as Cambridge look at module scores and want at least 1 A* (Bear in mind I have one A* and if I get an offer, they will want at least another one effectively giving me a minimum offer of A*A*AA)

    For your other question, it depends what you mean but physics related. Engineering, physics and chemistry will probably always be funded under the current government, so places are unlikely to go disappearing in the near future. Getting into those sorts of degrees will be fine as long as your maths is good - I took AS and A level maths in the first year (rather than doing FM and maths in parallel) so I have my A level in maths already which has made applying easy work. It really highlights that if you're good at maths, you shouldn't have much trouble going for a degree like physics or chemistry. Which is precisely why I would advise against doing economics.

    If you've got any questions about the whole process, I'll try and help seeing as I'm going through it now
 
 
 
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