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    I was thinking of applying to do a PPE course at Stirling, who request BCC with a C at Maths GCSE.

    I have a Maths GCSE grade C and haven't done Maths since, but when I was doing my GCSEs I was dropped a couple of classes for Maths, partially due to inability, I also missed an exam and a lot of lessons.

    Would you say that in spite of me having the required Maths grade, my uncertainty in Maths would make me struggle in the economics side?

    Is it unwise for me to do PPE?

    I have no problem with Politics or Philosophy. I failed my AS Philosophy, but we were only taught half the course and not given notes or a book to teach ourselves from, and we were told we wouldn't need any form of text book. My entire class, with varying levels of effort, failed.
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    (Original post by JoCassidy)
    I was thinking of applying to do a PPE course at Stirling, who request BCC with a C at Maths GCSE.

    I have a Maths GCSE grade C and haven't done Maths since, but when I was doing my GCSEs I was dropped a couple of classes for Maths, partially due to inability, I also missed an exam and a lot of lessons.

    Would you say that in spite of me having the required Maths grade, my uncertainty in Maths would make me struggle in the economics side?

    Is it unwise for me to do PPE?

    I have no problem with Politics or Philosophy. I failed my AS Philosophy, but we were only taught half the course and not given notes or a book to teach ourselves from, and we were told we wouldn't need any form of text book. My entire class, with varying levels of effort, failed.
    I know this isnt an amazing example but im currently doing economics at Liverpool. They required me to have GCSE grade B maths, but no A-Level needed. I have two modules which are 'mathsy', both of which are compulsory for the people who have triple combined PPE (as we dont have the actual specific programme here). I find the maths impossible, and I have GCSE grade A. So if I was doing PPE here I know id find it just as impossible as economics is for me haha. Dunno though, if you tried really hard with a combination of good tutorial and help sessions might be ok? Im changing course next year so the level of effort I put in on my present course isnt a great example.
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    (Original post by JoCassidy)
    I was thinking of applying to do a PPE course at Stirling, who request BCC with a C at Maths GCSE.

    I have a Maths GCSE grade C and haven't done Maths since, but when I was doing my GCSEs I was dropped a couple of classes for Maths, partially due to inability, I also missed an exam and a lot of lessons.

    Would you say that in spite of me having the required Maths grade, my uncertainty in Maths would make me struggle in the economics side?

    Is it unwise for me to do PPE?

    I have no problem with Politics or Philosophy. I failed my AS Philosophy, but we were only taught half the course and not given notes or a book to teach ourselves from, and we were told we wouldn't need any form of text book. My entire class, with varying levels of effort, failed.
    I would not worry about the Philosophy part, A level Philosophy is a bit of a sketchy course anyway, university starts from scratch.

    Regarding the Economics, it depends on what your overall feelings towards Maths are. There will be opportunity to learn the mathematical techniques you need, if you haven't seen them before but if you are the type of person who panics when you are faced with a page full of equations and strange symbols then you might need to get over that fear if you are going to study economics.

    There is a good book aimed at beginners called "Mathematics for Economics and Business" by Ian Jacques. It costs about £35-40 if you buy it new but you can usually pick up old editions on amazon for £5-10, and from the evidence of my university library the old editions were just as good, he first wrote this book many years back and all that's changed with the later editions is some online access to a test bank of questions of whatever, the older editions have exercises in with answers in the back so those are good enough to get started. The Jacques book will give you an idea of what sort of thing you will be doing and if you are going to be studying Economics at uni but are worried about the maths, then it's a book you can work through before starting (especially in the long summer holiday beforehands) and you will be up to speed with the algebra and calculus that you need.

    From what I've seen with people who regard themselves as non-mathematical, they can make huge progress in about 2-3 months if they actually put some time and effort in to studying it. Most of the time people who struggle at maths struggle because they basically don't understand the rules of algebra, what order you do different functions in, not able to rearrange equations properly, they get disillusioned because when they try to learn new aspects of maths they just get everything wrong anyway because of not having enough practice at those basic mathematical rules. Once you've got familiar and enough practice with the basic rules then learning new things in maths becomes fairly straightforward. It is a subject where you do need to put the effort into doing practice questions though, if you don't do that you will never get on top of it. But if you work through the exercises in the Jacques book before you start uni then you will be fine even if you've not done A level Maths....Jacques will have all the parts of A level that you need to get started in economics.
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    (Original post by MagicNMedicine)
    I would not worry about the Philosophy part, A level Philosophy is a bit of a sketchy course anyway, university starts from scratch.

    Regarding the Economics, it depends on what your overall feelings towards Maths are. There will be opportunity to learn the mathematical techniques you need, if you haven't seen them before but if you are the type of person who panics when you are faced with a page full of equations and strange symbols then you might need to get over that fear if you are going to study economics.

    There is a good book aimed at beginners called "Mathematics for Economics and Business" by Ian Jacques. It costs about £35-40 if you buy it new but you can usually pick up old editions on amazon for £5-10, and from the evidence of my university library the old editions were just as good, he first wrote this book many years back and all that's changed with the later editions is some online access to a test bank of questions of whatever, the older editions have exercises in with answers in the back so those are good enough to get started. The Jacques book will give you an idea of what sort of thing you will be doing and if you are going to be studying Economics at uni but are worried about the maths, then it's a book you can work through before starting (especially in the long summer holiday beforehands) and you will be up to speed with the algebra and calculus that you need.

    From what I've seen with people who regard themselves as non-mathematical, they can make huge progress in about 2-3 months if they actually put some time and effort in to studying it. Most of the time people who struggle at maths struggle because they basically don't understand the rules of algebra, what order you do different functions in, not able to rearrange equations properly, they get disillusioned because when they try to learn new aspects of maths they just get everything wrong anyway because of not having enough practice at those basic mathematical rules. Once you've got familiar and enough practice with the basic rules then learning new things in maths becomes fairly straightforward. It is a subject where you do need to put the effort into doing practice questions though, if you don't do that you will never get on top of it. But if you work through the exercises in the Jacques book before you start uni then you will be fine even if you've not done A level Maths....Jacques will have all the parts of A level that you need to get started in economics.
    I second this advice. I was surprised by how good the book is for people at our level. It's maybe even too patronising at parts, like explaining things like y + y = 2y (not even joking), but better to do that than to assume! Mine was £40 online, got the newest edition though. If I was carrying on with my course, it would be my saviour haha.
 
 
 
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