Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Will a massive rise in fees drive the generations apart? Watch

Announcements
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I would be extremely grateful if you would answer my following question concerning intergenerational fairness.

    In your book "The Pinch", you argue that "we are allowing one very big generation to break the inter-generational social contract because we do not fully understand it", and that you fear that the baby boom generation is failing to discharge to younger generations "a claim to participate in an extraordinary political, social and economic system that would give you a chance in life". How do you reconcile this argument with the government's decision to lift the cap on tuition fees? Surely it is the case that by lifting the cap on tuition fees to £9000, compared to the baby boomers who enjoyed free university education, you are actually driving the generations apart by breaking the bonds of reciprocity you argue for? Yes, austerity calls for funding cuts, and clearly the deficit must be tackled. But is it not the time for the baby boomers to carry their fair share of the burden?

    Thank you,

    Lewis
    • Specialist Advisor
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    You are right about the argument in my book The Pinch (available at all good bookshops!!!) The answer is that many fewer people went to university in my generation and we cannot afford to have continuing expansion of universities financed by taxpayers in general. I hope these reforms give univeristies a better incentive to focus on the teaching experience. And it is also why I was keen to change the profile of repayments - the lower monthly payments help people in their twenties and thirties but with payments carrying on for longer. It smoothes costs over the life cycle.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by David Willetts)
    You are right about the argument in my book The Pinch (available at all good bookshops!!!) The answer is that many fewer people went to university in my generation and we cannot afford to have continuing expansion of universities financed by taxpayers in general. I hope these reforms give univeristies a better incentive to focus on the teaching experience. And it is also why I was keen to change the profile of repayments - the lower monthly payments help people in their twenties and thirties but with payments carrying on for longer. It smoothes costs over the life cycle.
    is a lie

    we can, easily, you just have to crack down hard on tax evasion or raise taxes, to say its unaffordable when you waste money on wars and nuclear weapons is frankly insulting to the intelligence of the british people.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    So why exactly will the reforms give universities a better incentive to focus on the teaching experience? This "free market" rubbish is the worst argument ever. Students are not treated as consumers - they cannot demand money back if a product is unacceptable or easily switch universities if they are dissatisfied with the experience at one. What they have to do instead is drop out, which leaves something of a black mark on their CVs; the ones who do not drop out will not be rushing to badmouth their university after graduation since they will wish to retain the value of their degree while applying to jobs.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SciFiBoy)
    is a lie

    we can, easily, you just have to crack down hard on tax evasion or raise taxes, to say its unaffordable when you waste money on wars and nuclear weapons is frankly insulting to the intelligence of the british people.
    Yes, they could raise taxes. Sadly, a majority of the electorate pay taxes, and I doubt a government would make life more expensive for everyone in the country just because everyone wants to go to university for free- it would be... 'courageous'.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by LawBore)
    Yes, they could raise taxes. Sadly, a majority of the electorate pay taxes, and I doubt a government would make life more expensive for everyone in the country just because everyone wants to go to university for free- it would be... 'courageous'.
    im not suggesting they make everyone pay more tax, but those who can afford to pay more, should pay more, both in terms of the principle and fairness and in order to fund public services.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SciFiBoy)
    im not suggesting they make everyone pay more tax, but those who can afford to pay more, should pay more, both in terms of the principle and fairness and in order to fund public services.
    Since the 50p tax rate for the very rich has reduced revenue, how exactly do you propose to tax them more? If you closed loopholes etc it would have a similar effect in my view. Its not particularly nice, but thats the way it is.

    And they already do pay a lot more, for the exact reasons you just stated.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What time of year is the worst for students?
    Useful resources

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.