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    How will you be able to help graduate medical applicants who may not be given a student loan due to the fact it being a second degree. How will these students be able to fund themselves and pay their fees if they are increased.
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    Students on GEM courses only pay fees for their first year, the NHS pays the rest.
    As it's an equivalent or lower qualification (ie 2nd degree), they don't get loans, but there are lots of career development bank loans available, albeit with interest repayable on them.

    Most unis are sympathetic and let you pay over the 4 years of your course if you discuss your situation with them.

    It is hard, but I don't think the Govt should create a whole fee policy just for the tiny number of students who want to do GEM. You don't get loans if you want to do a second degree in Arabic or Chemistry or anything else so it's not an inconsistent policy - and it's not like second degrees were free under the last Government.
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    (Original post by angelmxxx)
    Students on GEM courses only pay fees for their first year, the NHS pays the rest.
    As it's an equivalent or lower qualification (ie 2nd degree), they don't get loans, but there are lots of career development bank loans available, albeit with interest repayable on them.

    Most unis are sympathetic and let you pay over the 4 years of your course if you discuss your situation with them.

    It is hard, but I don't think the Govt should create a whole fee policy just for the tiny number of students who want to do GEM. You don't get loans if you want to do a second degree in Arabic or Chemistry or anything else so it's not an inconsistent policy - and it's not like second degrees were free under the last Government.
    Firstly, you are conveniently neglecting to mention those on 5 year courses whom are expected to pay for four years of tuition fees up-front. That's potentially£36,000.

    Secondly, an MB ChB is not an ELQ. It's a higher level than a standard BSc. However, the SLC often refuse to accept this and there are currently court battles to redefine the policies around it.

    Thirdly, in the current state (i.e. with fees at 3k), graduate medics are currently using bank loans to live off. If grad medics are forced to use bank loans to fund tuition costs, they are no longer able to eat or house themselves. Keep in mind a typical CDL is around £20k. This would be a drop in the ocean when you combine living costs + £36,000 of tuition.

    You flitter around other examples of second degrees. I'm sorry, but do these degrees require an undergraduate as a pre-requisite for admission? No. They don't. It's not comparable.

    Overall, these students should have lending thrown at them. I'm happy to plunge myself into debt to enter medicine as a career because I know I will be able to pay that debt back with interest. Very few degrees can boast near 100% graduate employment and such a high starting salary. Offering loans to these students makes financial sense. It's much safer lending than other degrees which could ultimately provide profit for the funding organisations (and subsequently offer more funding for other students).
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    (Original post by angelmxxx)
    Students on GEM courses only pay fees for their first year, the NHS pays the rest.
    As it's an equivalent or lower qualification (ie 2nd degree), they don't get loans, but there are lots of career development bank loans available, albeit with interest repayable on them.

    Most unis are sympathetic and let you pay over the 4 years of your course if you discuss your situation with them.

    It is hard, but I don't think the Govt should create a whole fee policy just for the tiny number of students who want to do GEM. You don't get loans if you want to do a second degree in Arabic or Chemistry or anything else so it's not an inconsistent policy - and it's not like second degrees were free under the last Government.
    You forgot that many Graduates may be forced to take the 5 year route which can pretty expensive and can be nasty regarding the funding issues surrounding it. I knew someone who had to work 2 jobs alongside the degree, and with an intensive degree like medicine it became really difficult and she ended dropping out because of the financial pressure.
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    do these degrees require an undergraduate as a pre-requisite for admission? No. They don't. It's not comparable.
    Medicine doesn't require an undergraduate degree. If it did, it would be a postgraduate course. If you chose to do an undergraduate degree before doing Medicine, then that's exactly comparable to doing a second undergraduate degree.
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    (Original post by Becca-Sarah)
    Medicine doesn't require an undergraduate degree. If it did, it would be a postgraduate course. If you chose to do an undergraduate degree before doing Medicine, then that's exactly comparable to doing a second undergraduate degree.
    This thread is about graduate medical schools.

    Graduate medicine requires a degree and it's not a postgraduate course.

    And why should I be priced out of studying medicine just because I didn't have career options drilled into me at the age of 16?
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    (Original post by Becca-Sarah)
    Medicine doesn't require an undergraduate degree. If it did, it would be a postgraduate course. If you chose to do an undergraduate degree before doing Medicine, then that's exactly comparable to doing a second undergraduate degree.
    The thing is that medicine is one of those paths where you need to be pretty sure what your getting yourself into. It's 5-6 years of long intensive studying and a long and difficult career to follow, and being forced to make that decision at 17 doesn't seem too fair, doing some small amount of WE when your young isn't a strong backing either for you to make such a tough decision, situation might change a fews years down who knows. I think it should be open to people who choose to pursue the path later on in life. Also the medical field is in need of people with different skill sets.
 
 
 
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