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Fees hike and the NHS for Graduate Entry Medicine Watch

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    As a prospective applicant to the Graduate Entry Medicine course next year (starting in 2012), what will happen in the second, third and fourth years where the tuition fees under the current system are paid for by the NHS? Will the NHS continue to fund these at the higher rates, or will graduates be expected to find the potentially £9000 a year themselves, given that they are not entitled to a second tuition fee loan?

    If the latter, isn't it a little unfair to expect graduates to find the extra £32000 in order for them to study the subject in question?
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    (Original post by apotoftea)
    As a prospective applicant to the Graduate Entry Medicine course next year (starting in 2012), what will happen in the second, third and fourth years where the tuition fees under the current system are paid for by the NHS? Will the NHS continue to fund these at the higher rates, or will graduates be expected to find the potentially £9000 a year themselves, given that they are not entitled to a second tuition fee loan?

    If the latter, isn't it a little unfair to expect graduates to find the extra £32000 in order for them to study the subject?
    Wouldn't it be unfair to fund people doing medicine as a second degree, and not people studying economics, or maths, or chemistry, when they've all had their first degrees funded too?
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    (Original post by angelmxxx)
    Wouldn't it be unfair to fund people doing medicine as a second degree, and not people studying economics, or maths, or chemistry, when they've all had their first degrees funded too?
    It probably is, but it comes down to what subjects are and are not needed. Most health related courses qualify for NHS funding, as a school leaver or as a graduate. Also, I believe Medicine has a different QAA rating
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    (Original post by apotoftea)
    It probably is, but it comes down to what subjects are and are not needed. Most health related courses qualify for NHS funding, as a school leaver or as a graduate. Also, I believe Medicine has a different QAA rating

    True, but they could have done it as an undergraduate degree when they would have the loans (although I guess most people who do GEM did apply for undergraduate medicine and were rejected).
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    (Original post by angelmxxx)
    True, but they could have done it as an undergraduate degree when they would have the loans (although I guess most people who do GEM did apply for undergraduate medicine and were rejected).
    It's not as simple as that. Some people come into it much much later for whatever reason. You shouldn't be penalised for making a decision at the age of 16/17. The same could be said for someone wanting to go back and study Chemistry.

    And graduates do get the funding on the four course for fees, just through the NHS. My question is whether this will continue when fees go up
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    (Original post by apotoftea)
    It's not as simple as that. Some people come into it much much later for whatever reason. You shouldn't be penalised for making a decision at the age of 16/17. The same could be said for someone wanting to go back and study Chemistry.

    And graduates do get the funding on the four course for fees, just through the NHS. My question is whether this will continue when fees go up
    Not everyone who goes into it late will have a degree though, so they could get loans.

    I really do see your point, but obviously the Govt has limited resources so giving everyone funding for multiple degrees isn't really possible
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    (Original post by angelmxxx)
    Not everyone who goes into it late will have a degree though, so they could get loans.
    I'm talking specifically about the 4 year course though where you have to have a degree and it's currently funded. The worry is whether the funding will continue. And also, if they stop funding Medicine, (as don't forget school leavers get the NHS bursary in their 5th year) they'd be uproar. Also, if they stop funding Medicine, will they stop funding Nursing, Physio, Radiography?

    I really do see your point, but obviously the Govt has limited resources so giving everyone funding for multiple degrees isn't really possible
    It does, but if they suddenly stop all funding for NHS related courses for all applicants, what will happen?
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    I am discussing this with Andrew Lansley and we aim to get a solution asap.
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    (Original post by angelmxxx)
    True, but they could have done it as an undergraduate degree when they would have the loans (although I guess most people who do GEM did apply for undergraduate medicine and were rejected).
    Excuse me?

    It was through studying for my first undergraduate which lead to me realising that I wanted to train to be a doctor. Not only did it allow me to consider this decision, it also gave me opportunities to develop new skills which I will bring to a career in medicine, skills which otherwise may not be transferred into medicine if it wasn't for graduate entry. If it wasn't for my first degree, I probably never would have considered it and I have met many other students who have said the same.

    Ultimately, graduate entry produces doctors that have further education, and it introduces doctors from wider backgrounds and skill sets.
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    (Original post by David Willetts)
    I am discussing this with Andrew Lansley and we aim to get a solution asap.
    Nice to know it's being considered quickly, thank you
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    Hoping to hear the outcome of it soon.
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    (Original post by David Willetts)
    I am discussing this with Andrew Lansley and we aim to get a solution asap.
    Have you find the solution to this problem yet and personally I dont want to be in debt when doing 2 degrees which i don't have financial backing for.. i'm glad you are listening though ...
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    Hi all. I would like to know the answer to this question too. I am currently working within a hospital and I really want to undertake the Graduate Entry Medicine course. The problem is I really can't afford to pay £9000 for 4 years....
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    Although i'm only in my first year of uni, i'd like to know the answer to this question too!
    So i know how much i need to save up for over the next few years...
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    My guess is that they'll make student loans available for GEM.

    Don't quote me though
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    Any updates on this?
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    I would like to know this too....I am looking at applying for dentistry but have been crushed by the news that I may not be able to receive a loan for tuition fees....How the hell are people supposed to stump up £9,000 a year in cash when they are studying full-time?

    Absolutely idiotic system.
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    hi guys...
    do not quote me on this but my uncle is a doctor and he was readingh a BMJ newsletter and one of the stories was covering NHS funding for grad medicine.
    Apparently, the NHS is not feeling £27000 per student as this is too expensive. Instead, it is now being speculated that the graduate pays £27000 themselves (whichever way they can get hold of the money) and the NHS pays for the 4th year alone.

    Im a graduate too and this causes incredible distress
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    'In academic year 2012/13, in year one, graduate entry students will have to self-fund the first £3,375 towards their tuition costs. In later years, the NHS Bursary will continue to pay £3,375 towards their tuition. In all years of the graduate programme, a Student Loan Company loan will be available to cover the difference between £3,375 and the tuition charages of their universities, to a maximum charge of £9,000'

    NHS website

    So does this mean that 2012/2013, graduate students will pay £9000 themselves?
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    hey B-Beauty, it means that we will only have to pay the £3375 in 1st year and the rest will be covered by the student loans company, and in the other years the NHS will pay £3375 and the student loans company will pay the rest.

    So looks like going to be more loans :/ good news that we dont have to pay the full 9 grand though ....
 
 
 
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