Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    Hi, I am aspiring to read medicine at university. I have the work experience needed (I think), but was wondering, is it really hard to get a job as like a receptionist at a hospital?

    If I were to look for a job in a hospital, which post would you suggest applying for? Also for volunteering, are there any departments/wards which are more prone to accepting people? (As I know of someone volunteering in the A&E reception - due to contacts), but are there any departments that will accept more long-term volunteers?

    Many thanks!
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MedicalMayhem)
    Hi, I am aspiring to read medicine at university. I have the work experience needed (I think), but was wondering, is it really hard to get a job as like a receptionist at a hospital?

    If I were to look for a job in a hospital, which post would you suggest applying for? Also for volunteering, are there any departments/wards which are more prone to accepting people? (As I know of someone volunteering in the A&E reception - due to contacts), but are there any departments that will accept more long-term volunteers?

    Many thanks!
    How old are you?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    will be 16 when i do the work.
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MedicalMayhem)
    will be 16 when i do the work.
    I think because of your age, it will be very difficult to get a paid job as a NHS receptionist. This is for a number of reasons, but mainly due to the fact that you would have little or no experience and there will be a lot of more qualified applicants. You will also need to check your trust's policy on hiring under 18's - at least in my trust, you have to be a minimum of 18 years old.

    I think the better route to go down would be some voluntary work - although again, you need to check the minimum age. The minimum age for volunteering in hospitals in my trust is 18 years old, even in non-clinical areas. I currently volunteer as a receptionist once a week in an opthalmology ward. As for which are more prone to accepting people - it depends purely on your local hospitals.

    I know nursing homes/hospices allow under-18's to volunteer, so you may want to check out that route.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    Ahh thanks, I have looked along the care home route, but the ones nearby don't accept volunteers unfortunately.

    You said that you work in the opthamology ward, how long do you volunteer for every week? Also how old are you (sorry if this offends you :/), and how did you go about getting the volunteer vacancy, did you write to them or do you know someone that works there? Also what does the opthamology ward do, like what does it specialize in?
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MedicalMayhem)
    Ahh thanks, I have looked along the care home route, but the ones nearby don't accept volunteers unfortunately.

    You said that you work in the opthamology ward, how long do you volunteer for every week? Also how old are you (sorry if this offends you :/), and how did you go about getting the volunteer vacancy, did you write to them or do you know someone that works there? Also what does the opthamology ward do, like what does it specialize in?
    That's unfortunate. I know it is very difficult to find voluntary work.

    I volunteer every Tuesday morning from 8:30 - 12:30. It doesn't offend me. :p: I am 19, currently on a gap year and applying to medicine. My local trust has a specific 'voluntary services department' and I contacted them, and they sent me an application form (which I could also find on the website). I filled it in, sent it in and got the position.

    Opthalmology is the study of eyes, I work within the E.E.N.T. (eyes, ear, nose and throat) building. The particular area I am a receptionist for is called the EDCU - the eye day case unit - where patients come in for minor operations to their eyes, usually done under local anaesthetic, and then go home the same day. Most of the ops we get are cataract operations, so most of the patients are 65+. Being a receptionist is a lot more than just checking in patients: I have to sort out the files (put in packs with pre/peri operative sheets, put in charts, etc.) for all the patients in preparation for their pre-assessment and operation and that takes up a lot of my time. Every now and again I liaise between a patient in the recovery area with a relative in the waiting room.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Beska)
    That's unfortunate. I know it is very difficult to find voluntary work.

    I volunteer every Tuesday morning from 8:30 - 12:30. It doesn't offend me. :p: I am 19, currently on a gap year and applying to medicine. My local trust has a specific 'voluntary services department' and I contacted them, and they sent me an application form (which I could also find on the website). I filled it in, sent it in and got the position.

    Opthalmology is the study of eyes, I work within the E.E.N.T. (eyes, ear, nose and throat) building. The particular area I am a receptionist for is called the EDCU - the eye day case unit - where patients come in for minor operations to their eyes, usually done under local anaesthetic, and then go home the same day. Most of the ops we get are cataract operations, so most of the patients are 65+. Being a receptionist is a lot more than just checking in patients: I have to sort out the files (put in packs with pre/peri operative sheets, put in charts, etc.) for all the patients in preparation for their pre-assessment and operation and that takes up a lot of my time. Every now and again I liaise between a patient in the recovery area with a relative in the waiting room.
    :offtopic: very informative answer

    :ontopic:

    I'm the same age - 16 and trying to get work experience, if anyone you know a family member/ friend is currentlying being treated or has been and got on well with the surgeon/doctor trying talking to that doctor/surgeon as your first port of call that's what i did and i think i have got some lined up.
    Here is a separate link for applying for work experience
    http://www.nhsjobroutes.org.uk/nhs-work-experience.php
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Hey...I think your best chance is to LITERALLY stalk the hospitals around your area. What I mean is phone them regularly asking to do some voluntary work- phone each separate ward (this may take time but If you're anywhere as eager as me, you'd do what I did!). Also another great one to look at is the GPs and Pharmacies in your area.
    Always tell them that you just want to do some voluntary work to gain experience as you want to go into medicine and you'll be a great helping hand in their institution!

    Aaand one more hint for ya, contact your family GP/Doctor personally and beg them (in a dignified manner) to let you do 'some' voluntary work with them/at the place they work. Remember, you may not have contacts, as in family or friends that work within the medical field, but you always have your family doctor!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Beska)
    That's unfortunate. I know it is very difficult to find voluntary work.

    I volunteer every Tuesday morning from 8:30 - 12:30. It doesn't offend me. :p: I am 19, currently on a gap year and applying to medicine. My local trust has a specific 'voluntary services department' and I contacted them, and they sent me an application form (which I could also find on the website). I filled it in, sent it in and got the position.

    Opthalmology is the study of eyes, I work within the E.E.N.T. (eyes, ear, nose and throat) building. The particular area I am a receptionist for is called the EDCU - the eye day case unit - where patients come in for minor operations to their eyes, usually done under local anaesthetic, and then go home the same day. Most of the ops we get are cataract operations, so most of the patients are 65+. Being a receptionist is a lot more than just checking in patients: I have to sort out the files (put in packs with pre/peri operative sheets, put in charts, etc.) for all the patients in preparation for their pre-assessment and operation and that takes up a lot of my time. Every now and again I liaise between a patient in the recovery area with a relative in the waiting room.
    Thanks for this, it's been very informative. I do have volunteer work already, around 400 or so hours at the BHF but just wanted something more relevant to the course I want to pursue. Would you recommend that I contact a large department (i.e. A & E) or would I tend to get more luck in the smaller wards? As when I'm 16, I might approach the ICR (Institute of Cancer Research) again, as they said they might be able to give me a long-term volunteering, as I was 'eager'.

    I guess being 'over-eager' in anything helps a lot as I got a week working in a haemotology lab, by saying along the lines of 'I adore the workings of blood, I 'love' blood', and I guess my offer of work experience can't have been turned down :P
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MedicalMayhem)
    Thanks for this, it's been very informative. I do have volunteer work already, around 400 or so hours at the BHF but just wanted something more relevant to the course I want to pursue. Would you recommend that I contact a large department (i.e. A & E) or would I tend to get more luck in the smaller wards? As when I'm 16, I might approach the ICR (Institute of Cancer Research) again, as they said they might be able to give me a long-term volunteering, as I was 'eager'.

    I guess being 'over-eager' in anything helps a lot as I got a week working in a haemotology lab, by saying along the lines of 'I adore the workings of blood, I 'love' blood', and I guess my offer of work experience can't have been turned down :P
    I think it is best to try and contact the hospital administration directly rather than the individual wards. See if there is a work experience/voluntary services dept. at your local hospitals, and then contact them.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ithoughtofthis)
    Hey...I think your best chance is to LITERALLY stalk the hospitals around your area. What I mean is phone them regularly asking to do some voluntary work- phone each separate ward (this may take time but If you're anywhere as eager as me, you'd do what I did!). Also another great one to look at is the GPs and Pharmacies in your area.
    Always tell them that you just want to do some voluntary work to gain experience as you want to go into medicine and you'll be a great helping hand in their institution!

    Aaand one more hint for ya, contact your family GP/Doctor personally and beg them (in a dignified manner) to let you do 'some' voluntary work with them/at the place they work. Remember, you may not have contacts, as in family or friends that work within the medical field, but you always have your family doctor!
    I was trying to do this the other day, got round to phoning around 10 wards of my local hospital so far. Got about 20 left :P But i intend as you say, 'stalk' the hospitals, and maybe next weekend, might visit each ward, and see if I can get a volunteer vacancy at ANY of them So did you end up getting any volunteer work at any of the hospitals you enquired at?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MedicalMayhem)
    I was trying to do this the other day, got round to phoning around 10 wards of my local hospital so far. Got about 20 left :P But i intend as you say, 'stalk' the hospitals, and maybe next weekend, might visit each ward, and see if I can get a volunteer vacancy at ANY of them So did you end up getting any volunteer work at any of the hospitals you enquired at?
    Yeah I got the opportunity to sort of shadow a doctor. I basically just walked around wherever the doctor went unless I was asked to stay with a secretary and help do some sorting or something. Not the most exciting thing in the entire universe but looked great on my UCAS! And it was actually really exciting most of the time to be honest.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ithoughtofthis)
    Yeah I got the opportunity to sort of shadow a doctor. I basically just walked around wherever the doctor went unless I was asked to stay with a secretary and help do some sorting or something. Not the most exciting thing in the entire universe but looked great on my UCAS! And it was actually really exciting most of the time to be honest.
    Sounds fun but i'm looking forward to my work experience i've planned, as it would be good relief after my whole load of GCSEs Hopefully the pathology/haemotology work experience may be slightly more interesting
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ithoughtofthis)
    Yeah I got the opportunity to sort of shadow a doctor. I basically just walked around wherever the doctor went unless I was asked to stay with a secretary and help do some sorting or something. Not the most exciting thing in the entire universe but looked great on my UCAS! And it was actually really exciting most of the time to be honest.
    Doesn't matter about how good it looks on your UCAS, it's about how much it made you think about why you wanted to be a doctor
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by digitalis)
    Doesn't matter about how good it looks on your UCAS, it's about how much it made you think about why you wanted to be a doctor
    Aren't they kinda the same thing?
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Beska)
    Aren't they kinda the same thing?
    No, I could say I worked with HEMS for six months (looks good on my UCAS) where in actual fact I was a paid street charity collector(/mugger) signing up direct debits for HEMS (doesn't actually teach much about being a doctor).
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by digitalis)
    No, I could say I worked with HEMS for six months (looks good on my UCAS) where in actual fact I was a paid street charity collector(/mugger) signing up direct debits for HEMS (doesn't actually teach much about being a doctor).
    Fair does!
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    How about volunteering at a hospice if you have one in the area?
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Lazaroo)
    How about volunteering at a hospice if you have one in the area?
    That's fine, good experience.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I dont know how young a 16 year old you are, but at the hospital I work at you can be a healthcare assistant from the age of 17, so it may be worth looking into getting some bank HCA work when you're old enough? Its really good experience, and pretty fun too
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What newspaper do you read/prefer?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.