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    I'm just a little confused, I'm doing my biology A2 coursework on yeast fermentation of different sugars/carbohydrates. So, my hypothesis is that:

    If Glucose is a monosaccharide and is immediately ready for Glycolysis then it should produce the most amount of carbon dioxide in a certain time frame in comparison to Sucrose, Fructose, Lactose and Maltose.

    But, is glucose the only sugar that undergoes glycolysis? to split the sugar into two 3 carbon molecules pyruvic acid? So, sugars such as maltose which is a disaccharide that undergoes Hydrolysis to split the sugar into two glucose molecules?

    So, after hydrolysis of a disaccharide e.g. of maltose, is it ready for glycolysis after that? or does glycolysis only apply to glucose?

    Hope you understand what I'm trying to say! Lol

    Thanks in advance xx
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    (Original post by jimbob_)

    But, is glucose the only sugar that undergoes glycolysis? to split the sugar into two 3 carbon molecules pyruvic acid? So, sugars such as maltose which is a disaccharide that undergoes hydration to split the sugar into two glucose molecules?

    Thanks in advance xx

    Glucose isn't the only molecule which undergoes Glycolysis.

    I'm mildly confused as to what you're asking further. Are you asking if the hydration of maltose will still result in glycolysis? If so, I would presume it would once it was hydrolysed to the two alphas.
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    Polysaccharides are broken down to monosaccharides before glycolysis.

    Different monosaccharides can enter glycolysis at different stages. Eg Glucose becomes glucose-6-phosphate then fructose-6-phosphate, whilst fructose immediately becomes fructose-6-phosphate.

    Don't really know what the hell you're asking though.
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    (Original post by Philip_H)
    Glucose isn't the only molecule which undergoes Glycolysis.

    I'm mildly confused as to what you're asking further. Are you asking if the hydration of maltose will still result in glycolysis? If so, I would presume it would once it was hydrolysed to the two alphas.
    Ahh okay, thanks

    Yes, that is what I'm asking. I meant, after maltose has undergone hydration, will glycolysis take place after that? Sorry, I should've phrased it better!
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    (Original post by moley89)
    Polysaccharides are broken down to monosaccharides before glycolysis.

    Different monosaccharides can enter glycolysis at different stages. Eg Glucose becomes glucose-6-phosphate then fructose-6-phosphate, whilst fructose immediately becomes fructose-6-phosphate.

    Don't really know what the hell you're asking though.
    Yes, sorry, I should've phrased it better. I meant, after the hydrolysis for instance of maltose, will glycolysis take place after that?

    Also, can I just ask, my results from my experiment show that sucrose produces the most carbon dioxide in the certain time frame, why is that? when it is a disaccharide...
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    (Original post by jimbob_)
    Yes, sorry, I should've phrased it better. I meant, after the hydration for instance of maltose, will glycolysis take place after that?

    Also, can I just ask, my results from my experiment show that sucrose produces the most carbon dioxide in the certain time frame, why is that? when it is a disaccharide...
    Must be something to do with the Beta glucose?

    Is beta even in sucrose?
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    (Original post by jimbob_)
    Yes, sorry, I should've phrased it better. I meant, after the hydration for instance of maltose, will glycolysis take place after that?

    Also, can I just ask, my results from my experiment show that sucrose produces the most carbon dioxide in the certain time frame, why is that? when it is a disaccharide...
    because you have GLUCOSE AND FRUCTOSE (2 substances which can do glycolysis) instead of just glucose so obv youll hav more co2 produced. mandem flex one ting,
 
 
 
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