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Scared about going to the doctors,help? Watch

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    So..i have a doctors appointment tomorrow that i booked because i'm not sure if i have depression and i haven't really given going much thought but it's just dawned on me how much i'm actually terrified. I have absolutely no idea what i'm going to say. What do i say? I'm also kinda worried that my GP will tell me what i'm feeling is normal (seeing as i think my boyfriend leaving me triggered the depression) but its been over a month and its just getting worse.
    Does anyone know what the procedure is? Like will he ask me questions, get me to tell him how i feel or whatever, speak to my parents e.t.c?

    Anything would be great, thanks
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    (Original post by xemochildlolx)
    So..i have a doctors appointment tomorrow that i booked because i'm not sure if i have depression and i haven't really given going much thought but it's just dawned on me how much i'm actually terrified. I have absolutely no idea what i'm going to say. What do i say? I'm also kinda worried that my GP will tell me what i'm feeling is normal (seeing as i think my boyfriend leaving me triggered the depression) but its been over a month and its just getting worse.
    Does anyone know what the procedure is? Like will he ask me questions, get me to tell him how i feel or whatever, speak to my parents e.t.c?

    Anything would be great, thanks
    It may well be that the split with your boyfriend has caused a reactive depression. One in four people (and I think these days it is getting closer to one in three) suffer with mental health problems, a lot of those being depressive illnesses. You will find that when you get to your GP the conversation will just happen, even if your thoughts all spill out in a big jumble. Even if you begin by just saying "I feel low at the moment", the doctors have a lot of experience with people going to them with the same concern and so will ask the necessary questions. They will more than likely use a depression scale, such as Beck's Depression Inventory, or the PHQ-9 questionnaire (you can google these and will see what I mean), to see if/how depressed you are. They may ask questions about your sleep, appetite, social network, current stressors, whether you have had any suicidal or self harming thoughts, whether you have any enjoyment or motivation at current, whether your mood gets better throughout the day, and so on. If you have any more questions, feel free to PM me.
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    Hopefully your GP will be sympathetic towards your situation. If I were you I'd go and be totally honest about the way you are currently feeling because if your GP doesn't know the whole story then it's difficult for them to help you.

    Maybe start off with saying you have been feeling exceedingly down for the past few months and you are starting to think you may be depressed. Maybe you could describe your symptoms and how they make you feel. Your GP will ask further questions about this to get a good idea of your situation.

    Obviously the consultation will be totally confidential so your GP probably won't speak to your parents unless you ask him/her to. The only time this confidentiality would ever be broken was if your GP thought you were in danger of harming yourself or others around you. It might be good for you to open up to your parents though, so they know how you are feeling and can support you too.

    In terms of the help you might be offered - perhaps counselling. I go to therapy and I guess I'm not ashamed to admit that, it's good to talk things through with someone who can put them into perspective and give advice. Anti depressants might also be offered, if appropriate or if after counselling you feel you have not made steps forward.

    Good luck, hope the appointment goes okay for you!
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    I think it was on QI where they said doctors treat more people for depression than any other ailment. Please don't be scared to see your GP, they're there to help and will have heard it all before. Seeking help is the first step to recovery. He may refer you to a therapist who will ask you the more personal questions, or prescribe some antidepressants short term until you're feeling better.
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    thank youu to those who replyed, i actually feel a lot better now
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    (Original post by smilee172)
    One in four people (and I think these days it is getting closer to one in three)
    Have you ever actually tried to dig out the primary source for these 1 in 4/1 in 3 statistics? They pretty much don't exist.
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    (Original post by Cybele)
    I think it was on QI where they said doctors treat more people for depression than any other ailment. Please don't be scared to see your GP, they're there to help and will have heard it all before. Seeking help is the first step to recovery. He may refer you to a therapist who will ask you the more personal questions, or prescribe some antidepressants short term until you're feeling better.
    Psychiatric reasons account for about 20-30% of GP consultations. Probably double that if you include the hypochondriacs and neurotics.
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    write stuff down before you go, because when you get in there it all gets a bit confusing and if you've got a list to fall back on then you won't forget anything.

    Don't be scared, they'll just ask you some question so be honest, they might get you to do some computer questionnaire thing again just be honest and see how it goes.
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    Might be a bit late to reply but no need to worry about going the doctors.
    The doctor would have seen people with depression before and he most probably would have heard the words you say to him before.

    Best thing to do is just start off with a simple phrase, such as you are having trouble sleeping/ feeling low for a while or whatever you find to be the most distressing sign for you, such as you have had suicidal thoughts, or you've cried a lot. It is easier to start off that way then just say, I think I might have depression.

    Mourning something after a loss is only a natural human response, such as in this case, your boyfriend leaving. Only when it starts to disrupt your day to day functioning does it become problematic and if its been a while since you've been feeling this way then it is best to seek help.

    The procedure :
    Once you go to the GP, they will ask you what you have come there for today.
    You explain how you've been feeling etc.
    They will then do an electronic questionaire that asks questions about eating habits, sleeping habits, moods, suicide, pleasure etc.
    It will then return a score about how severe the depression is and then the doctor would suggest treatments.
    Typically, it would be self help guides, Antidepressants and talking therapies.
    You leave and feel better knowing that something is being done about it !



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    well, i think its fair to say it went awful. I mentioned all the sleeping problems and feeling down etc, and he said i was just stressed because of my gcses. Feel so stupid ahah
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    Well maybe seek a second opinion ? GPs aren't experts in mental health and your doctor may not know a lot about mental health. There isn't anyway of him knowing that your depressed, unless you tell him your feeling or if he gets you to fill in a questionaire of some sort, which will produce a score that shows him.

    Only you, yourself know how you are feeling and if you have been feeling like this for a while, say a month or longer and there isn't an obvious reason for it (for example, loss of a loved one, or relationship breakup) and it is intefering with your daily functioning - as you have mentioned sleep problems and just feeling rubbish, and this is most of the time then I would say it was depression.

    Only filling out a medical questionaire will give you an 'official' diagnosis to a doctor.
 
 
 
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