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What did you do for extracurricular activities in order to stand out? Watch

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    I tried to fit as much of my question into the title as I could so I apologize that it does not sound very professional.

    So, I am currently in an undergraduate program for ASU in Arizona, U.S. and am wondering what unique extracurricular activities or groups students have participated in throughout college that made them stand out from the rest of other law school applicants. I know that the school that I am attending now is not much compared to Ivy League schools, but I am paying out of my pocket for school and am trying to make the best out of my situation. If anyone could give me any input I would greatly appreciate it. Thank you! ^_^
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    Well on mine I wrote how I single-handedly taught my entire sixth form their A level subjects. Every single one of them got A*

    :sexface:
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    Other than lie. I'm not trying to be offensive, but I would appreciate it if I only got serious answers. Thank you!
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    (Original post by PaperSnowAGhost!)
    Well on mine I wrote how I single-handedly taught my entire sixth form their A level subjects. Every single one of them got A*

    :sexface:
    Hello! Sorry I feel very stupid asking this question, but I don't quite entirely understand what your "sixth form" is. I am assuming that "A level subjects" are equivalent to the United States' lower- or upper- division classes?
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    (Original post by Cassandra_Z)
    Hello! Sorry I feel very stupid asking this question, but I don't quite entirely understand what your "sixth form" is. I am assuming that "A level subjects" are equivalent to the United States' lower- or upper- division classes?

    Ah don't worry

    Sixth Form is the 2 years before university. I don't know US terms. But you are 16-18 years old.

    Normally students do 4 AS (Advanced Subsidiary) Subjects in the 1st year of Sixth form, then drop one and continue with 3 to A2 (Advanced Level) in the 2nd year.

    Some take 4 AS and continue all 4 onto A2
    Some take more, like i have 5 AS and 4 A2 and going to take another award.
    The amount you do does not really matter as long as its necessary for your university.
    E.g. to study Mathematics you need Maths A level and Further Maths A level.
    The subjects range from anything to everything.

    You can ask anything you like, hope this helps
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    (Original post by Cassandra_Z)
    Hello! Sorry I feel very stupid asking this question, but I don't quite entirely understand what your "sixth form" is. I am assuming that "A level subjects" are equivalent to the United States' lower- or upper- division classes?
    I have the opposite problem of not knowing what your exams are. However A-levels are taken before leaving school at 18, GCSEs are taken at 16. Sixth form is the two years after GCSEs in which you study for A-levels (and, to confuse you further, AS-levels which are a sort of half-way mark taken at 17).

    As for extra-curriculars, debating is a good place to start for non-law students, lawyers may prefer mooting. Both are fairly standard to have though. Outside of that, in the UK it doesn't matter so much as long as you can demonstrate that you're a) an interesting person who makes the most of opportunities through a variety of activities, and b) someone who has contributed and made a difference somewhere (i.e. you were a captain of a sports team, ran the college bar, organised volunteer work in the community, etc).

    I suppose voluntary work is useful if you want to talk about pro bono work in your applications. In the UK we have advice services students can work for called the Citizens Advice Bureau (helps people with debt issues, making benefits claims, household or landlord issues, etc). People a bit further along in their legal education might volunteer with the Free Representation Unit.

    If you're looking at big international firms then it may be helpful to be able to demonstrate an interest in other cultures, travel and so forth.

    At the end of the day though, as I said just make sure you have a good variety of interests/activities and that you've "done" something for a club/society.

    [As an aside, this is mainly a British forum so you may want to take advice with caution simply because recruiters in the US may be looking for different things. From my limited understanding they seem to expect students to have held certain "prestigious" positions like editor of a student law journal or some such thing that we don't really have over here.]
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    @PAPERSNOWAGHOST!: Wow! Now that I understand that, that's impressive that you did such a thing at a young age. And thank you for answering my question, I definitely learned something new today. ^_^

    @MIFOU: Thank you for your response! It has definitely given me a better insight as to what I can do for extracurricular activities. I do still have one question: so if you can write about your experience with A-levels when you were 16-18 do you know if I can mention activities that I have participated in High School alongside my university experiences?

    :/ I know it's kind of odd for me to be in a British forum, especially since i'm from a random place in the U.S., but I couldn't find a U.S. student forum that I liked and where students weren't trying to make absurd or rude comments.
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    (Original post by PaperSnowAGhost!)
    Well on mine I wrote how I single-handedly taught my entire sixth form their A level subjects. Every single one of them got A*

    :sexface:
    You wish. I got BBCB damnit!
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    "Depth" is quite impressive i.e. on the committee, organising stuff etc.

    Other than that just lots of different things

    There is no "secret" to it really. If you were a recruiter and were reading C.V.s, what kind of stuff would you find impressive?
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    (Original post by Milk <3)
    i lie
    If you are good enough at lying to sound convincing, then you are good enough for one of these law firms!

    Just remember that liars have good memories.
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    (Original post by hmaus)
    Personally I would rather see a balanced CV with good grades, part-time job and a few decent activities than one where the candidate does loads of activities but the grades suffer and he/she doesn't have any part-time or holiday work. So I would be wary of going overboard on the activities unless you definitely have time!
    Maybe, but the problem is there are hundreds of candidates who can offer a balanced CV: 2:1 from a good uni, some part-time work, some ECs.

    My firm had 750 applications for 22 places on its Winter Vac Scheme (top-tier London firm). Obviously regional and non-commercial firms aren't as competitive, but they are still very competitive so I think people shouldn't be under the illusion that a 2:1, some part-time work and some ECs are enough on their own to make it straightforward to get a job.
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    Having attended US law school as a study abroad student most of my classmates had work experience, most were mid to late twenties with good GPA's and LSAT scores.

    Things like service trips inside or outside the US, volunteering, commercial experience, any form of work experience, part time jobs etc are all good, as are sports teams, drama clubs etc. Anything you are interested in, are going to enjoy doing, and can write about in a personal statement and get good references from.

    Positions of responsibility, leadership and team work are all important attributes to have on your CV both for school and for future jobs.

    I did the UK equivalent of Peace Corps which lots of firms and schools have really liked. As someone else mentioned debating, mooting, Model United Nations, public speaking all are great and well regarded by US schools from what I experienced.
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    Mooting is the big one - get involved with that if you can. Make sure you get a partner you can work well with rather than just one of your mates. Also, I think some unis offer drafting competitions now - it's not as exciting as mooting but it's a tough skill to get the hang of when you do the vocational stage of training so I recommend getting a head start if you can.
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    (Original post by jacketpotato)
    Maybe, but the problem is there are hundreds of candidates who can offer a balanced CV: 2:1 from a good uni, some part-time work, some ECs.

    My firm had 750 applications for 22 places on its Winter Vac Scheme (top-tier London firm). Obviously regional and non-commercial firms aren't as competitive, but they are still very competitive so I think people shouldn't be under the illusion that a 2:1, some part-time work and some ECs are enough on their own to make it straightforward to get a job.
    Agreed. I mean there are millions of things you can do, I think its more about how you write about them on applications. Rather then I did this and I did that, show what differences you made and why that will make you a better candidate for the job.
 
 
 
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