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    hey,

    I have a dilemma which I hope someone has experience of.

    I have already signed a contract with one firm but just got an offer with another one which will offer me a better position. Both are with IBanks. I don't know what to do, if I can still "change" my mind and go for the offer number 2 and how the first firm will take it.

    Please, help
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    (Original post by bellissimo)
    hey,

    I have a dilemma which I hope someone has experience of.

    I have already signed a contract with one firm but just got an offer with another one which will offer me a better position. Both are with IBanks. I don't know what to do, if I can still "change" my mind and go for the offer number 2 and how the first firm will take it.

    Please, help
    They have no choice but to accept it.
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    Contracts aren't worth the paper they are written on. A bank can get rid of you at any time for any reason they deem applicable. It is your career, renege if you want. Don't feel like you have to be loyal to the bank before you've even started. You will see in time that the loyalty you give them may not be returned come the next downturn. Do it politely, explain your reasons and keep HR on side.
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    well you are now bound by your signature, but like what are the terms and clauses of the contract which you have signed? And ofcourse there are ways for the termination of the contract.
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    Hey,

    thanks for your replies, they are really helpful. To tell the truth, I am feeling really bad about the whole situation and concerned about the second firm finding out and condemning the action of "breaching" the contract with the first employer.
    Do you think, could they do something like that and withdrae the offer as the act of solidarity within the industry?

    The terms specify one month notice in case of resignation but not sure if it can be applied to this situation yet.
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    You've entered into a legally binding written contract. Be honest with your employer and negotiate something. They have probably dealt with this before. They may even try and offer you more money to stay!
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    Just listen to Zurich and JakeF, they're the only ones who seem to know what they're talking about on this thread.

    Also, think about whether you're really important enough for a bank to chase around and try to screw you over. Especially with 100 applicants per place.
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    Forgot to add that both of contracts are for a graduate role so I am pretty nervous about staying without anything in my hands
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    (Original post by SimonSmart)
    You've entered into a legally binding written contract. Be honest with your employer and negotiate something. They have probably dealt with this before. They may even try and offer you more money to stay!
    Be quiet.

    The bank wont give a ****. They wont offer you an increased salary. The second bank will not withdraw the offer as an act of 'solidarity', there is no solidarity 'pact' when it comes to hiring. Bank Y is not going to go 'oh sorry Bank X, we didnt know he had signed with you, we shall now withdraw our offer so we can all be friends again. Sorry. After all, he's only a graduate, we wouldnt want to fall out over someone that hasnt even started at your bank yet'

    Its part of the industry, this fluid movement of staff at all levels. Deal with it. It happens. You are not as important to them as you think.

    OP, if you wish to take the second offer, and you believe it is where you want to start your career, then renege on the first. They wont remember you as 'the kid that reneged', graduates are a dime a dozen. I echo what i said initially.

    Be polite. Talk to HR, tell them your reasons. Just be totally sure when you talk to them because your decision is concrete.
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    Speaking from experience of exactly this situation, as JakeF has already said, be honest. It's really not a big deal. However, be sure, because there's no going back once you submit this in writing; you'd just look like an ass.
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    thanks very much for your advice, guys
    it's really great to look at the issue from other people's perspective and share experiences
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    (Original post by JakeF)
    Contracts aren't worth the paper they are written on. A bank can get rid of you at any time for any reason they deem applicable. It is your career, renege if you want. Don't feel like you have to be loyal to the bank before you've even started. You will see in time that the loyalty you give them may not be returned come the next downturn. Do it politely, explain your reasons and keep HR on side.
    This might be the most intelligent thing you've ever said lol
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    (Original post by RJA)
    This might be the most intelligent thing you've ever said lol
    Awww, i have a fan
 
 
 
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