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    Hey,

    I'm hopefully applying for HKU to study Economics in 2012, the university and country is amazing! Now for UK students (non-jupas) the requirements on the website are around 'EE' surely this cannot be correct?

    I have a few questions I was wondering if anyone can answer;
    I'm an english student studying: Maths, Accounting, Economics and Financial Studies all currently at AS level. It's probably to early to judge predicted grades but I am aiming for AAAA. Next year I pick up Further Maths (AS) and Mandarin.
    My GCSE's were all A's and B's, bringing me onto my main questions.

    What would companies offering scholarships look for in a student?
    Are my potential grades an issue?
    Is there anything I can do to make me stand out from other applicants?

    Thank you so much for reading!
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    The requirements might be EE but those are for the Hong Kong A levels and while they do require a minimum of EE, many, many applicants will apply with much, much higher grades so the EE requirement becomes irrelevant.
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    (Original post by edward_wells90)
    The requirements might be EE but those are for the Hong Kong A levels and while they do require a minimum of EE, many, many applicants will apply with much, much higher grades so the EE requirement becomes irrelevant.
    Yeah true, think that's the same with most uni's.
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    (Original post by EzPz)
    Yeah true, think that's the same with most uni's.
    Not really, most unis in the UK have high entry requirements.
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    yeah HKU is like really difficult to get in and they pick best mainland students who have almost highest grades in china's college entrance exams... anyways i heard they didn't really like A level programs outside HK...

    good luck

    btw hong kong people dont speak mandarin... they speak cantonese which is completely incomprehensible to mandarin speakers. you might be thinking of getting some extra help from locals or something
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    Last year, all five students from my school got into HKU got 5A/A*s without scholarships
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    (Original post by chaosteve13)
    Last year, all five students from my school got into HKU got 5A/A*s without scholarships
    Thankyou for the reply. Do you know if they applied for a scholarship? Also sorry to keep asking questions but do you have any idea what subjects they were? And any other information on their entry?
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    (Original post by Johnshopkinser)
    yeah HKU is like really difficult to get in and they pick best mainland students who have almost highest grades in china's college entrance exams... anyways i heard they didn't really like A level programs outside HK...

    good luck

    btw hong kong people dont speak mandarin... they speak cantonese which is completely incomprehensible to mandarin speakers. you might be thinking of getting some extra help from locals or something
    Thank you for the reply plus comments! I understand that in HK they speak mainly cantonese, yet I thought perhaps not only for business later on it looks like i'm at least making an effort into studying perhaps their second language.

    Also I was going to ask where did you hear they didn't like A level programs? Just wondering because there are many HK students in my college now who are studying ALevels also and are applying - apparently it's every so slightly easier due to the 'non-jupas' scheme where they may have to give a certain amount of places out?

    Thanks once again.
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    (Original post by Johnshopkinser)
    yeah HKU is like really difficult to get in and they pick best mainland students who have almost highest grades in china's college entrance exams... anyways i heard they didn't really like A level programs outside HK...

    good luck

    btw hong kong people dont speak mandarin... they speak cantonese which is completely incomprehensible to mandarin speakers. you might be thinking of getting some extra help from locals or something
    Yeah i'm pretty curious as to where you got your info from. I got into HKU with my GCE results, as did a lot of my friends.

    Have to agree with you that the Mainland students here are all top notch students...But HKU is looking to attract more international students so there shouldn't be a problem if one has the academic merit to back his/her application.
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    @EzPz
    Effort to learn another person's language is always appreciated.
    There is a non-jupas scheme but there is no such thing as "giving certain amount of places out". Ultimately it depends on your academic results and application.

    What would companies offering scholarships look for in a student?
    A: No idea but check out HKU's scholarship schemes. e.g. foundation scholarship, entrance scholarship.
    Are my potential grades an issue?
    A: For Economics, it might be best to check with the Faculty itself. Keep in mind that Economics is a very competitive degree, and pretty Maths intensive too.
    Is there anything I can do to make me stand out from other applicants?
    A: What else do you do besides studying? Internships/Sporting achievements etc are always useful
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    (Original post by EzPz)
    Thank you for the reply plus comments! I understand that in HK they speak mainly cantonese, yet I thought perhaps not only for business later on it looks like i'm at least making an effort into studying perhaps their second language.

    Also I was going to ask where did you hear they didn't like A level programs? Just wondering because there are many HK students in my college now who are studying ALevels also and are applying - apparently it's every so slightly easier due to the 'non-jupas' scheme where they may have to give a certain amount of places out?

    Thanks once again.
    I study at an A Level Centre in mainland China and I heard about the reluctance of HKU accepting students outside HK from my counselors. Some students applied to HKU last year from our school but very few succeed...they've all got like 3A's at least.
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    (Original post by DeLing)
    Yeah i'm pretty curious as to where you got your info from. I got into HKU with my GCE results, as did a lot of my friends.

    Have to agree with you that the Mainland students here are all top notch students...But HKU is looking to attract more international students so there shouldn't be a problem if one has the academic merit to back his/her application.
    As explained above.
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    Out of curiosity, are you planning on funding through scholarships, or through self-funding/family support? I'm asking because I'm in China right now (British student) and am applying for either uni in the UK, China or HK, but naturally money is the big issue. No student loans outside Europe as far as I know.
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    (Original post by mrnightcat)
    Out of curiosity, are you planning on funding through scholarships, or through self-funding/family support? I'm asking because I'm in China right now (British student) and am applying for either uni in the UK, China or HK, but naturally money is the big issue. No student loans outside Europe as far as I know.
    Why would you go to a Chinese university for undergrad.....:confused: unless it was tsinghua peking university or fudan its not worth it.
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    (Original post by PKU_Research007)
    Why would you go to a Chinese university for undergrad.....:confused: unless it was tsinghua peking university or fudan its not worth it.
    Depends what you do and especially what you plan to do in the future. There are also a few more worthy universities than just in Beijing, or Shanghai for that matter. My university is Xiamen University, which is still a very highly ranked university in China. For subjects that can be done in the UK, most Chinese universities would indeed not be worth it if I can get the same done in the UK. But for other subjects, there's little wrong with doing an undergrad in China if you've chosen a respectable university. The most you are usually able to study in the UK related to China are either Chinese language or Chinese all-rounded studies, which are great mind you in their own right, but I'm looking for more specific subjects. For example:

    -Chinese literature and language (as in the same way one would study an English lit/lang degree in the UK, not a language learning course)
    -Chinese law
    -Chinese internatonal relations
    -TCFL/Teaching Chinese as a Second Language

    ...are a few courses which have no equivalent in the UK. Education problems pervade a huge number of universities and courses in China, but not so much the above, apart from maybe TCFL (a lot of Chinese language teachers teach using outdated or rote methods). There's no equal to studying Chinese literature and language in the UK, and you can't exactly do degrees in Chinese law, Chinese international relations or governmental policies in the UK either.

    Lastly, my other reason is because I've lived in China for a while now studying Chinese, have now scored the required proficiency level to study a degree in Mandarin, and would like a China-oriented career.
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    No xiada is not a high ranked university are you chinese ethnic or not?? As someone who does research in China, has been to many different universities cause I have friends all over in China NO university that are not the big 7 are worth going to if you are a non chinese national. Cheating is rampant in these universities and there is no actually learning going on. Maybe in the UK there aren't the programs you want but most top US universities have programs on Chinese law or Chinese governmental policies. I am currently doing research at Peking University and the few students that aren't "bei baoyan" at Beida unless they are from the universities that are pushing for more western thought are extremely academically dishonest. I have already had two confront two individuals one from tianjin university and another from a university in guangxi about their behavior. I am blasting the Chinese education system cause you can buy a degree buy a gpa buy a transcript buy anything. Just speaking chinese doesn't mean anything buddy. If you really want to go to a top university than go to one. We all had to take the HSK (Scored a 10 on the old one and still needed to go through the interview process at Tsinghua and PKU for my masters got offers and scholarships but am waiting to hear from LSE to see if I got into the dual degree program) Having a degree from a no named degree in CHina will actually hurt you in China my friend. There are enough foreigners that speak fluent chinese that go to top schools int he west that a foreigner in xiamen will be laughed at imho. Its like a kid I met from canada who went to harbin institute of technology. His Chinese was excellent but he freaked out when he was in Beijing, Any chinese employer or foreign employer took a student from a western university with fluent chinese over a foreigner with fluent chinese from a chinese university. If you really want to do something in China go try for a real university that can help you instead of trying to be a token laowai. You can totally study chinese literature in the west Uchicago, Yale, UCLA, UHawaii manoa in Chinese if you really want to and still get a good job in China. Honestly don't waste your time if its not at least zhejiang university at least. Plus your in the south its not even biao zhun putonghua. zhui zhishi bie zhui kua ganme ni kao bu shang zhongxue daxue de kaoshi ne
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    (Original post by PKU_Research007)
    No xiada is not a high ranked university are you chinese ethnic or not?? As someone who does research in China, has been to many different universities cause I have friends all over in China NO university that are not the big 7 are worth going to if you are a non chinese national. Cheating is rampant in these universities and there is no actually learning going on. Maybe in the UK there aren't the programs you want but most top US universities have programs on Chinese law or Chinese governmental policies. I am currently doing research at Peking University and the few students that aren't "bei baoyan" at Beida unless they are from the universities that are pushing for more western thought are extremely academically dishonest. I have already had two confront two individuals one from tianjin university and another from a university in guangxi about their behavior. I am blasting the Chinese education system cause you can buy a degree buy a gpa buy a transcript buy anything. Just speaking chinese doesn't mean anything buddy. If you really want to go to a top university than go to one. We all had to take the HSK (Scored a 10 on the old one and still needed to go through the interview process at Tsinghua and PKU for my masters got offers and scholarships but am waiting to hear from LSE to see if I got into the dual degree program) Having a degree from a no named degree in CHina will actually hurt you in China my friend. There are enough foreigners that speak fluent chinese that go to top schools int he west that a foreigner in xiamen will be laughed at imho. Its like a kid I met from canada who went to harbin institute of technology. His Chinese was excellent but he freaked out when he was in Beijing, Any chinese employer or foreign employer took a student from a western university with fluent chinese over a foreigner with fluent chinese from a chinese university. If you really want to do something in China go try for a real university that can help you instead of trying to be a token laowai. You can totally study chinese literature in the west Uchicago, Yale, UCLA, UHawaii manoa in Chinese if you really want to and still get a good job in China. Honestly don't waste your time if its not at least zhejiang university at least. Plus your in the south its not even biao zhun putonghua. zhui zhishi bie zhui kua ganme ni kao bu shang zhongxue daxue de kaoshi ne
    No, as I said in my first post I'm British, and studying over here. And Xiamen University is a highly ranked university, usually ranked around 13th. I just know you're going to come back and question how high 13th in China really is, but it is high enough from the view of pretty much every Chinese person I know. I also have my own personal reasons for being in Xiamen.

    Cheating indeed is rampant in many Chinese universities. But you can hardly speak for all of them. The Chinese person closest to me, for example, attended university here and since we'd known each other for a long time, I got a very good feel for exactly how her classes and work went. She didn't do any cheating. Heck, I was even allowed to attend her graduation ceremony in person, that's how close I was with her and her university. I'm aware that cheating is an important consideration - one of the most important ones for me - but a key to knowing which places, courses and students don't meet is insider knowledge and friendships with students.

    No offence to you, but honestly, how would I get the money to study in the US? It's not hard to be financially capable in China as a foreigner, but I could never imagine having the money to study in the US, great programs or not.

    you can buy a degree buy a gpa buy a transcript buy anything
    Rather surprised by your blanket statements for someone who has passed HSK 10 and is doing research at Peking. Not that I'm trying to put down your ability at all, but you sound a bit bitter. And besides, I asked someone else a question but you'd rather pick an argument, nay slate me for my personal choice. What do you really know about me? You'd be wrong if you think I'm here under some illusion, my reasons for being here have taken several years of consideration. Anyway that statement is a rather laughable exaggeration, and if you really know your stuff about China, you know that too. Perhaps the most corrupt local government officials try to do so to illegally boost their children (mostly it's stealing the education records of better students), but certainly not your average Chinese graduate.

    I'd rather not turn this thread into an off-topic argument, in fact we're both veering well off this topic's purpose. No-named degree? As I said, Xiamen Uni isn't a no-name place, and I spent plenty of time contacting universities in the UK - Sheffield, SOAS, etc - who answered that a degree from there fits fine into their consideration of a good Chinese university should I apply for a Master's in the future. A manager from Huawei in the UK said that if I graduated from Xia Da and contacted her, she'd bring me in for an interview for a good grad job. So you see, it really depends on what you're looking for in the future. I'm looking for a China-oriented career, and I didn't mention in China specifically.

    As I said, there are differences in how one would study Chinese literature in the US and in China. In the US you'd obviously have to learn Chinese before you head into Chinese literature, like in the UK I presume. Studying Chinese literature in China is the same as how a Chinese student would study. Like an English-speaking student would study English literature in the UK or elsewhere. In China you'd go into far more depth, obviously. No, the south does not speak standard Mandarin in general, but that doesn't mean I'm not being taught it or don't speak it.

    So anyway, thanks for the slating, name-calling and blanket statements. "Token Laowai" is just what other foreigners pull when they've had a bad day and want to put down someone else for little decent reason. Oh, and could you at least put some tones with that pinyin sentence? Not even the Chinese people I asked to read this post can understand what you're trying to express.
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    W/e Dude I am highly suspect of any "foreigners" chinese that claims to be at a below top 5 university. I am not bitter at all just observant. Even my own colleagues have admitted that they have on more than one occasion been accosted by students that have asked to buy. If you really need tones then you are no way ready for any university. And honestly its a bit bizarre. I don't know how long you've been in China buddy but you are naive and very arrogant. You can ask a chinese friend what does "bai mian" mean (and if you need tones for that there is no way in hell you got and HSK 5). SO lets be frank, you can't get into a british uni so you want to boost up the ego, my RA calls people like you paper baskets and its quite understandable. But then again the British have always been arrogant when it comes to China so it shouldn't be surprising its continued. And Token laowai is quite adequate description of a foreigner with no chu xi that gets an ego boost by saying NI HAO MA decently... but then again its for "personal" reasons. I meet plenty of you paper baskets at PKU that decide to take the exam for entrance to PKU and then complain when they get rejected. Maybe xiamen doesn't check to see if an individual is at a certain level but Im sure SOAS and sheffield will.
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    (Original post by PKU_Research007)
    Why would you go to a Chinese university for undergrad.....:confused: unless it was tsinghua peking university or fudan its not worth it.
    HKU is a seriously good uni, plus HK is a awesome city. Its ranked higher than most UK Universities and top in Asia (if you believe the stats.)
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    I do fully see the point in going to HKU - I even like their library and am thinking of doing a PhD there (as if they'd ever accept me ). But... when it comes to mainland China, well, I was considering to do a Masters/PhD there, at some of the universities mentioned above (originally I thought that there's no sense in doing it at a non top 5/7 university).

    What I was told by academics at SOAS and Warwick that all have been to mainland Chinese universities for numerous visits or have taught there for some time was: don't do it (and most had a somewhat irritated expression when saying that). It's not worth it, the academic education even at the best couple of universities is at best average to UK standards and it's basically just a waste of time if I want to stay in academia or want to "show off" my China knowledge after having lived/studied there for 2-4 years to companies/organisations that have a clue about Chinese education. I was rather irritated at first but kind of started to understand them after having talked to a couple of Chinese students I know and that have studied at these kind of universities before. Last but not least, I was told, a degree from globally renowned universities will make it easier for you to find a well-paid job in China, no matter in which sector you wanted to work. <- just hear-say but I do believe them to have a point.
 
 
 
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