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Being a barrister Watch

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    why would anyone would want to be trained as a barrister? guysss please give some logical answers.....:confused:
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    pleeaaaassssseeee pppplllll
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    (Original post by asuraiya84)
    why would anyone would want to be trained as a barrister? guysss please give some logical answers.....:confused:
    I'm interested in becoming a barrister because of the prospect of dressing up.
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    I'm on a law-based masters and one of my fellow students is applying for bar school for next year. She seems to have based her choice on the abundance of louis vuitton bags among barristers she's seen at work, haha.
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    Decent pay I guess?

    Plus some people just like arguing, lol.
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    Interest, that's the main thing.
    Second main thing: interest in money.

    You have to be analytical and logical, so if you're someone who's done Literature/History/Mathematics, you're in there.

    Corporate law is better for money, though.
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    (Original post by Happy Insomniac)
    I'm on a law-based masters and one of my fellow students is applying for bar school for next year. She seems to have based her choice on the abundance of louis vuitton bags among barristers she's seen at work, haha.
    Haha, hopefully that will make the time more interesting. If the genuine interest isn't there, she might as well do something else.
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    Everyone knows Barrister's are just failed History Teachers.

    God. :')
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    (Original post by asuraiya84)
    why would anyone would want to be trained as a barrister? guysss please give some logical answers.....:confused:
    Logical answers, that's the key. Being a barrister means you can get up in court and argue the truth (or a lie, depending on which side is paying you :L) and give the public some answers - who committed the crime, whose fault is it, what can we do?
    Also, I'm considering law as a career 'cause I just like to argue with people Solicitors can't get up in court, they just tell the barrister the case and deal with the client. Don't you think it would be so much fun to jump up in court shouting 'OBJECTION!!!' ? I think it would but if that's not you then so be it. It takes all sorts to make a world!
    And as an added bonus, they get paid quite a bit although that didn't even cross my mind until I read the other responses.
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    Process of elimination - the other options seem pretty awful. An interest in law. The enjoyment of public speaking.
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    Please don’t sit the BPTC OP. The statistics are something like 25% of those who sit it get a pupillage. The other 75% have completely wasted their time and money. You obviously haven’t done enough research to be making a decision like this if you think that the answers you put on your BPTC application form matter a jot. The BPTC providers are commercial enterprises. If you pay them, they will take you, unless you have an IQ of 60, and sometimes even then. It doesn’t mean you have a hope in hell of making it as a barrister. If you can’t even answer the question “Why do you want to train to become a barrister?” yourself I really don’t see how you’re going to be in the minority that makes it. Do something else.
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    I'm going to assume fun.
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    They get all the ass.
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    Thanks all. it was help indeed!!!!!!hhhaaahhaa
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    (Original post by joanna-eve)
    Logical answers, that's the key. Being a barrister means you can get up in court and argue the truth (or a lie, depending on which side is paying you :L) and give the public some answers - who committed the crime, whose fault is it, what can we do?
    Also, I'm considering law as a career 'cause I just like to argue with people Solicitors can't get up in court, they just tell the barrister the case and deal with the client. Don't you think it would be so much fun to jump up in court shouting 'OBJECTION!!!' ? I think it would but if that's not you then so be it. It takes all sorts to make a world!
    And as an added bonus, they get paid quite a bit although that didn't even cross my mind until I read the other responses.
    Just for your information - solicitors can get rights of audience in every court now. There are solicitor QCs and there's a solicitor judge in the supreme court. Advocacy is no longer the purview exclusively of barristers - particularly in the lower courts, where it's just not economical to instruct counsel for every hearing. That's one of the things that's making it harder to become a barrister; there's less work because more of it's being done by solicitors.
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    (Original post by Fysidiko)
    Just for your information - solicitors can get rights of audience in every court now. There are solicitor QCs and there's a solicitor judge in the supreme court. Advocacy is no longer the purview exclusively of barristers - particularly in the lower courts, where it's just not economical to instruct counsel for every hearing. That's one of the things that's making it harder to become a barrister; there's less work because more of it's being done by solicitors.
    Ummm really not true. Yes solicitors can be advocates but I have only ever come up against on ONCE. It is certainly not one of the reasons making it harder to become barrister.
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    (Original post by LuverlyLawyer)
    Ummm really not true. Yes solicitors can be advocates but I have only ever come up against on ONCE. It is certainly not one of the reasons making it harder to become barrister.
    In certain sectors this is true though perhaps not in employment and more commercial matters. I am a family trainee ! and I am in court three to five times most weeks. Those are simple applications such as injunctions and conciliations. I plan (and am supported by the firm) to do more as I get more experience. Some (admittedly not very successful but there are a LOT of them!) barristers I have got to know through doing this don't even make it to court as often as I am already!!
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    (Original post by LuverlyLawyer)
    Ummm really not true. Yes solicitors can be advocates but I have only ever come up against on ONCE. It is certainly not one of the reasons making it harder to become barrister.
    I beg to disagree.

    I don't know what your field is but buy someone at the criminal bar a drink and ask her!

    Generally the bar is still doing most of the heavy crown court trials and never did a large proportion of magistrates court work but what they are losing are crown court pleas and applications.

    Legally aided and low budget family will go the same way.
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    In my country there is no split between the work of solicitor and barrister. Why there should be any split I do not get it.Yes to me too,it seems solicitors works are more than a barrister,since he already prepares the case and barrister just presents that. I do not know whether I am right in what I am saying,if there is anything more a barrister does I would like to know in detail.
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    (Original post by asuraiya84)
    In my country there is no split between the work of solicitor and barrister. Why there should be any split I do not get it.Yes to me too,it seems solicitors works are more than a barrister,since he already prepares the case and barrister just presents that. I do not know whether I am right in what I am saying,if there is anything more a barrister does I would like to know in detail.
    The bar really consists of two overlapping groups of people. The first are specialists in areas of law where there would be insufficient demand for their services in most law firms. These specialists e.g. in tax or trusts or land use planning can therefore act as consultants advising the clients of many different law firms. The second are specialists in advocacy as a skill.

    The time of solicitors is very expensive because law firms carry very large overheads to provide a service to the public. Barristers have comparatively low overheads because of the way they are organised. Therefore, in the same way that a large commercial firm will outsource specialist or labour intensive projects, solicitors outsource specialist or very labour intensive work to the bar.
 
 
 
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