Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

For people that got A's or A*'s last year - AS/A2 what is your study routine? Watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Do you have a study timetable..?
    *an uploaded one would be fantastic* - I'll give my rep to the best one!

    How many hours did you do?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Timetables work for some, for others not.
    Some people are naturally clever and don't need to study a lot, but most have short bursts of study and revising the same topic a week again, and then re-check after a month.

    If you want a general guide, then do work in 30 minute short bursts, and then take 15 minutes break... adjust the scale to see how it'd fit you, but don't study for long because your attention drops.
    During your break, get out of your chair and have some fun, exercise, anything to let your mind off work and have the circulation running.

    When you set out your tasks, make sure they're broken down chunks and not something too general because you have to check if you're on track for time.
    i.e. don't do "30 minute Chemistry" rather set out something like Week 1, Monday 6.30 PM "15 Minute Bonding and Structure, 10 Minute Equations, 5 Minute Moles" etc.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I think it's also the case of reading over and making sure that you understand what you did in class at home. This really helped me. I remembered it better when I did come to revise.

    But yeah also trying to learn things as you go along, makes revising a lot easier!
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I personally didn't buy into the whole timetable thing. Some days I just wouldn't be in the right frame of mind to work and I'd just get frustrated trying as I wouldn't achieve what I'd said I would Found it a lot easier just to work when my mindset was right!

    Definitely agree with the revising over time thing though - makes it easier in the end as you won't have to cram in loads at once!
    I also found sticking things to walls has always been a good method for me. Even now at uni, when I need to remember something I'll write it big, coloured or however will be useful, and stick it on my wall so I look at it regularly, seems to go in!

    Just whatever you do, keep motivated and stick with it good luck!
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Here's what I did-

    Walk into room, see textbook on floor, read textbook until distracted, drop textbook and repeat.

    Closer to the exams it was-
    Walk into room, see past papers on desk, do a couple, read textbook until distracted, get 3A*s -> PROFIT?

    EDIT: Whoever negged this can suck my 3A*s.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Relax until the crimbo holiday, Cram like hell (have crimbo eve , day , boxing day , new years eve , new years day off).
    Relax until Easter , Cram like hell.
    Repeat for A2
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I woke up at 10.15, then did a 11.00-12.30 session, a 1.30-3.00, then a 4-5.30. Sometimes I would do a 7.30-8.30.

    I didn't have a fixed timetable, it was rolling one, i.e i only started revising for a subject about 1-1.5 weeks before the exam.

    My revision consisted of, in subjects like maths and physics, doing a past paper and marking it every day. In history and economics I would take one file divider (e.g foreign policy, religion etc.) and condense it all on to one spider diagram on one page. I would then learn these off by heart before the exam.

    With a less relevant subject like critical thinking i almost ignored it.

    Doing this transformed my results from BCC in January to AAAAB in June.
    Online

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by rugbygreg)
    Relax until the crimbo holiday, Cram like hell (have crimbo eve , day , boxing day , new years eve , new years day off).
    Relax until Easter , Cram like hell.
    Repeat for A2
    Haha, I crammed like heeeelll 2 weeks before the exam ... MISTAKE!!!

    Read through everything you have learnt, even if you do understand it. Make to do lists and be organised. Do a lot of past papers, get familiar with the questions you're going to be tested on. Find your weak points within a subject, practise lots and familiarise yourself ^_^ Basically, do a lot of independent study - learning only during lessons at college will not guarantee an A/A*.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Past papers for like a week leading up to the exams.
    That's all i did really.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    If you're doing English that has a closed-text exam learn the poems off by heart, you'll get showered with marks.
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Don't. Timetable.
    Read/learn until you understand. Don't stop before you understand, and don't sit there for ages after you do.
    Timetables just destroy efficiency.

    personally I did nothing all year and then did a hardcore month of several daily hours, building up to ~8-10 when they were very close.
    I suggest you don't do this.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Six weeks of revision/exam prep, start off easy and build up. Include past papers/timed essay practice. Enjoy what you study, make it fun/interesting.

    The people I know who studied more sciency subjects and did awesome generally did as RedCasino advised.

    The girl I know who did best (Something like A* A* A* A B O.O) didn't have a TV and had restricted access to the internet.

    Not worrying about how badly or well you're going to do is also key, feeling like a failure and thinking too much about the future isn't good. Staying simply focused on doing sensible amounts is best - don't tire yourself out or try to do too much.

    Summarise it down to yourself - maybe use mnemonics/strange picture or story sequences to remember more conceptual subjects - linking quotes with generic titles.
    In the mentalist Jane suggests a memory palace; a place you know well - eg home - and detailing facts or faces and names through out (To help Rigsby pretend to be a dead man at a party for getting information and tracking down a killer) - Eg:
    You go through the door, the beginning of the occupation of France, the vague details of armistice pinned to the door - the house number is the date, where the persecuted are on the mat, being chased out by the mother (she shouts at them the surface reasons for persecution, acts out details of their persecution, and wears a top detailed with the actual reasons they were persecuted), when she's going back in, she reaches the hall, where the military strategies (shoes) are kept, and the failings of Petain can be seen - the shoes are old and in need of repair and so forth. Mind if you use this, make sure you know it inside and out so it can be used dynamically for different questions and titles - unless you have an awesome memory, don't pack it with details, you'll be more focused on remembering them than anything else. Don't do it on the day/morning before the exam - only probably enough as a last ditch attempt at a bank for quotes, or general themes to be noted down before you start the exam, but as a back up incase you panic and forget everything, in this case.

    Teach someone else.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    A few things that worked AMAZINGLY for me.

    Find a friend in a class someone who is of equal ( or more intelligence) than you and spend an hour or so every day or few days going through handouts/concepts test each other, make it fun. Do it in different places, as long as you enjoy it you'll learn better. (I did this for law, as well as writing revision notes and I managed full marks on my exam A* overall)

    As for times (which is what you actually asked) my personal preference was as and when. Although during the last 2 weeks leading up to exams (study leave) I went into college everyday and revised with friends there. I found it much more fun, and in fact... instead of having as stressful exam time not being able to concentrate at home it was probably the fun-est exam period ever.

    But if you work better with a schedule, do it. Just make sure its REALISTIC. Nobody (sane) can work 9-5 on one thing while taking it all in equally. The brain can only /really/ absorb information for 45 minutes at a push... so I'd say 30 mins on, 10-15 mins off. an hour for lunch and then stop well before you go to bed, have a few hours chillout beforehand.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Well before my January modules I got pneumonia and was in hospital then on bed rest for several weeks before the exams, so I just read my notes in between sleeping 16 hours a day, more or less. I suggest you don't do this.

    After Easter I was off on study leave, but I knew I wouldn't concentrate as well at home as at school, so I made myself get up every day at 7 and go into school and sit in the library and study. I found the structure of a 9-3 day better than just getting up whenever and studying to whenever, and it means you have your evenings free to relax but still feel like you've done a good amount of work . I didn't really have a timetable though, just tried to give all my subjects roughly equal time, weighted towards whichever exam was next. And I did a lot of past papers/example essays, I'm not really into the whole colour-coded-spider-diagrams, but whatever works for you works I'm lucky enough to have a good short-term memory, so that was a big help. I got A*A*A*A. And I agree with the teach someone else thing, it really helped me, particularly for essay subjects because you get everything straight and ordered in your head instead of knowing everything, but in a random assortment of points.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Didn't do any sort of revision, my teachers thought I would fail because I didn't do the homework, loved proving them wrong <3
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I would find a timetable to be hard to stick to so i'm planning on just studying whatever when i feel like it. I feel that i'm on my way to a few As, but i've payed close attention since we started and whenever we did something, i would master the concept at the time by reading alot about it, understanding different view points on it and so forth. So this leaves me with a relatively easy revision schedule and more time for Christmas celebrations.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    *subscribes*
    i really dont know how to revise, im naturally really illogical, stupid and easily distracted lol
    if i revise with friends i just sit and talk and doss about... any help?


    anyone? :/
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    *Subscribes* Teehee
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Hippysnake)
    Here's what I did-

    Walk into room, see textbook on floor, read textbook until distracted, drop textbook and repeat.

    Closer to the exams it was-
    Walk into room, see past papers on desk, do a couple, read textbook until distracted, get 3A*s -> PROFIT?
    I see, that seems simple and effective... The problem i'm having is how to "see textbook on floor, read textbook" instead of "see Playstation on floor, play Playstation!" lol
    How did you overcome temptations that could potentially stop you from doing any work?
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Allnighter before exam.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Did TEF Bronze Award affect your UCAS choices?
    Help with your A-levels

    All the essentials

    The adventure begins mug

    Student life: what to expect

    What it's really like going to uni

    Rosette

    Essay expert

    Learn to write like a pro with our ultimate essay guide.

    Uni match

    Uni match

    Our tool will help you find the perfect course for you

    Study planner

    Create a study plan

    Get your head around what you need to do and when with the study planner tool.

    Study planner

    Resources by subject

    Everything from mind maps to class notes.

    Hands typing

    Degrees without fees

    Discover more about degree-level apprenticeships.

    A student doing homework

    Study tips from A* students

    Students who got top grades in their A-levels share their secrets

    Study help links and info

    Can you help? Study help unanswered threadsRules and posting guidelines

    Sponsored content:

    HEAR

    HEAR

    Find out how a Higher Education Achievement Report can help you prove your achievements.

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.