Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Science Help Please Watch

Announcements
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hey, I need to know the best way to revise for a Gcse practical experiment and the test that you sit with in Science. I need to revise 'How science works' and could do with some good websites. Also, i need to know the difference between precise and accurate. I also need to know all the possible graphs I could do for my coursework and which variables determine which graph I need to use. I know for a categoric independent variable I must produce a bar graph to show my data. I also know that continuous independent variables require a line graph. But where do scatter graphs come in. And would you regard discreet variables and ordered variables as categoric variables? Is there anything else useful I should know? I also need a good explanation of what a Control Variable is as I am struggling to understand its definition. Help would be appreciated loads and thank you in advance.

    BelieveandSucceed
    x
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Believeandsucceed)
    Hey, I need to know the best way to revise for a Gcse practical experiment and the test that you sit with in Science. I need to revise 'How science works' and could do with some good websites. Also, i need to know the difference between precise and accurate. I also need to know all the possible graphs I could do for my coursework and which variables determine which graph I need to use. I know for a categoric independent variable I must produce a bar graph to show my data. I also know that continuous independent variables require a line graph. But where do scatter graphs come in. And would you regard discreet variables and ordered variables as categoric variables? Is there anything else useful I should know? I also need a good explanation of what a Control Variable is as I am struggling to understand its definition. Help would be appreciated loads and thank you in advance.

    BelieveandSucceed
    x
    The ISA? Erm... well as regards to the graphs, we were kind of told which would be appropriate. :/

    The control variable is something that you keep the same in each experiment. For example, if it was something to do with how fast a toy car would roll down a slope, and the slope angle was the same each time, but you changed the mass of the car, then the slope angle would be a control variable, the mass of the car would be the independent variable, and the time taken would be the dependant variable.

    When drawing a graph, the independent variable (the thing you change) is on the x (horizontal) axis, and the dependent variable (the thing that changes when you change the independent variable) is on the y (vertical) axis.

    "Accurate" is referring to how close the measurement is to the "actual" value. "Precise" is in reference to the reproducibility of the experiment, so whether you would get the same results each time you did it.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hey, Thankyou for your help but I thought reliable refers to the reproductibility of the results?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    our school's key word sheet for ISAs, i'm guessing you are yr10/11? They tweaked the key terms for the new AQA spec.

    • In everyday language the word theory means something rather uncertain – a hunch e.g. “I have this theory about him/her”. In science the word theory is used very differently to this and is much more robust. In science, something is only called a theory if it:
    1. explains a wide range of things;
    2. makes predictions that can be tested;
    3. is falsifiable i.e. could be shown to be false. Darwin’s theory of evolution could be shown to be false if, for example, fossilised human footprints were found in the same layer of ancient rocks as dinosaurs.
    • An independent variable is what you deliberately change to see the effect it has.
    • The dependent variable is what you measure each time you change the independent variable.
    • The control variables should be kept constant otherwise they might affect the results and make conclusions invalid. If it is impossible to control something then it should be monitored. A control group is often used in testing new drugs, and involves them being given placebos (dummy drugs).
    • A continuous variable is one that can have any numerical value, whereas a categoric variable is described only by labels/words.
    • An accurate measurement is one which is close to the true value.
    • Precision of a measuring instrument is the smallest scale division e.g. most rulers have a resolution of 1mm.
    • Reliable results have a small degree of scatter - they are close to the mean value
    • Random errors cause measurements to be spread around the true value, often caused by inconsistent measuring techniques.
    • Systematic errors cause measurements to be spread about some value different to the true value. A zero error is a type of systematic error e.g. bathroom scales not set to zero before weighing.
    • Repeating results or comparing with results obtained by other people makes them more reliable and also enables anomalous results to be easily identified. The sample size needs carefully choosing so as to make the results reliable without being excessive.
    • Values are the results/measurements.
    • The range is the interval between the highest and lowest value e.g. 120 – 160 cm.
    • A measuring instrument is calibrated by marking fixed points on the scale against some standard e.g. 0°C and 100°C on a thermometer.
    • A linear relationship is one which produces a straight line on a graph.
    • A directly proportional relationship is where there is a fixed ratio between the variables. This causes the graph to be a straight line that passes through the origin (0,0).
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by gingerbreadman85)
    our school's key word sheet for ISAs, i'm guessing you are yr10/11? They tweaked the key terms for the new AQA spec.

    • In everyday language the word theory means something rather uncertain – a hunch e.g. “I have this theory about him/her”. In science the word theory is used very differently to this and is much more robust. In science, something is only called a theory if it:
    1. explains a wide range of things;
    2. makes predictions that can be tested;
    3. is falsifiable i.e. could be shown to be false. Darwin’s theory of evolution could be shown to be false if, for example, fossilised human footprints were found in the same layer of ancient rocks as dinosaurs.
    • An independent variable is what you deliberately change to see the effect it has.
    • The dependent variable is what you measure each time you change the independent variable.
    • The control variables should be kept constant otherwise they might affect the results and make conclusions invalid. If it is impossible to control something then it should be monitored. A control group is often used in testing new drugs, and involves them being given placebos (dummy drugs).
    • A continuous variable is one that can have any numerical value, whereas a categoric variable is described only by labels/words.
    • An accurate measurement is one which is close to the true value.
    • Precision of a measuring instrument is the smallest scale division e.g. most rulers have a resolution of 1mm.
    • Reliable results have a small degree of scatter - they are close to the mean value
    • Random errors cause measurements to be spread around the true value, often caused by inconsistent measuring techniques.
    • Systematic errors cause measurements to be spread about some value different to the true value. A zero error is a type of systematic error e.g. bathroom scales not set to zero before weighing.
    • Repeating results or comparing with results obtained by other people makes them more reliable and also enables anomalous results to be easily identified. The sample size needs carefully choosing so as to make the results reliable without being excessive.
    • Values are the results/measurements.
    • The range is the interval between the highest and lowest value e.g. 120 – 160 cm.
    • A measuring instrument is calibrated by marking fixed points on the scale against some standard e.g. 0°C and 100°C on a thermometer.
    • A linear relationship is one which produces a straight line on a graph.
    • A directly proportional relationship is where there is a fixed ratio between the variables. This causes the graph to be a straight line that passes through the origin (0,0).
    Thanks. This has helped loads. :>
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Will you be richer or poorer than your parents?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.