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    Hi. I'm a student applying for medicine and have recieved an interview at Bristol. Was on the website doing some preperation etc and came across the "Prospective Student Bibliography"

    Was wondering if I was supposed to have read any/all of the books on this list before my interveiw. If so... I'm screwed!!

    If anyone can help, tell me if I need to read or don't, I'll be forever grateful.

    THANK YOU.
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    (Original post by Issy123K)
    Hi. I'm a student applying for medicine and have recieved an interview at Bristol. Was on the website doing some preperation etc and came across the "Prospective Student Bibliography"

    Was wondering if I was supposed to have read any/all of the books on this list before my interveiw. If so... I'm screwed!!

    If anyone can help, tell me if I need to read or don't, I'll be forever grateful.

    THANK YOU.
    You won't have been expected to read anything in particular, but it's good practice to be aware of current affairs in medicine, particularly according to new researches and ethics. If you have itunes, I would suggest downloading the podcast 'medical matters.' It is free, and you could choose any of the uploaded installments. It deals with current affairs in medicine, and would a nice talking point.

    Also, have a look in recent the news for medically related matters. There was a massive study done about this time last year looking at the prevelance of mutations in the human genome in various types of cancer, and the UK looked at small-cell lung carcinoma (and I think they looked at Colorectal cancer too). it was covered quite well in the Times if I remember correctly. They highlighted that such patients have an extremely high number of mutations (it was well into the 10s of thousands) in their genome, and if large cohorts of patients' genomes were sequenced, they could possibly look for common mutations found in lung cancer specifically, and thus tailor treatments for those patients individually. We are a few years at least away from this being widespread, but this should start you off with a good example of a topical subject to be aware of.

    As I said, they aren't going to expect you to be aware of specific stories and topics, but be sure to be a equipped with a couple of topical issues. Know your ethics!!!!!

    That's all I can advise. Good luck
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    (Original post by ringham33170)
    You won't have been expected to read anything in particular, but it's good practice to be aware of current affairs in medicine, particularly according to new researches and ethics. If you have itunes, I would suggest downloading the podcast 'medical matters.' It is free, and you could choose any of the uploaded installments. It deals with current affairs in medicine, and would a nice talking point.

    Also, have a look in recent the news for medically related matters. There was a massive study done about this time last year looking at the prevelance of mutations in the human genome in various types of cancer, and the UK looked at small-cell lung carcinoma (and I think they looked at Colorectal cancer too). it was covered quite well in the Times if I remember correctly. They highlighted that such patients have an extremely high number of mutations (it was well into the 10s of thousands) in their genome, and if large cohorts of patients' genomes were sequenced, they could possibly look for common mutations found in lung cancer specifically, and thus tailor treatments for those patients individually. We are a few years at least away from this being widespread, but this should start you off with a good example of a topical subject to be aware of.

    As I said, they aren't going to expect you to be aware of specific stories and topics, but be sure to be a equipped with a couple of topical issues. Know your ethics!!!!!

    That's all I can advise. Good luck
    Perhaps look specifically at stem cell research and think about ethical issues or cancer therapy and ethical/communication issues or gene therapy and how it might work- you wont be able to rpedict all the scenarios so make sure you are aware of the basic principles of ethical decisions- treat every person as an individual. as a doctor be aware of the options and the evidence base, do no harm and assess and explain the risks versus the benefits , consider quality of life as well as the wishes of the person and perhaps the peoplel who know them best, involve the multidisciplinary team eg GP, liasion specialist nurse, voluntary groups to help the person make decisions and support them in their decision. If resources are not easily available the hospital ethics committee may need to be consulted, there is no right or wrong answer , but a doctor would always act within the guidance provided by the General Medical Council and the law.
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    Thanks soooo much --- very apprecieated!
 
 
 
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