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    Hi guys, was wondering if anyone on here could give me a bit of advice.

    I am a recent music graduate (July of this year) who has had a change of heart. Although it may seem like a pretty significant change in direction, I am now seriously considering applying to study medicine in the next few years, an idea which I have been toying with for some time.

    I am confident of my commitment to helping others (I am politically engaged, and the one thing preventing me from making an absolute decision on medicine at this point is my interest in international development and the possibility of working in foreign aid/international NGOs), my questions are regarding how best to prepare myself for application to medical schools given my academic background.

    Just a brief overview to help you guys out:

    First class degree in Music from Leeds College of Music (More prestigious than it sounds! Haha. Course split 50/50 between performance and academia, believe that I could obtain very positive references from my lecturers regarding my academic potential as I received an award for my dissertation).

    A Levels:
    A/B/B/a (English Lit/History/Music/Biology A at AS level, dropped it before A2)

    GCSEs:
    3 A* (two of which were for double award science) 3As, 2 Bs, 1 C.

    I am currently working as a HCA (been on an orthopaedic trauma ward for about two months) and really enjoying it. Being in a hospital environment encouraged my interest in medicine again after I had previously tried to dismiss the idea as unrealistic.

    Ideally, I would be looking to apply for medicine next year or the year after (for 2012/2013 entry), so if anyone has any advice on how I could strengthen my application/build upon my experience, or knows any arts (or even music!) graduates who have gone on to study medicine, then any information or opinions would be welcome. I am currently thinking that I would be best suited to the 6 year foundation courses, but the Clinical Sciences degree at Bradford that allows conversion to Leeds medicine also appeals.

    Basically I am interested in any views people have on the subject, so sound off as you like! And sorry for the long post .
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    (Original post by MusicNow)
    Hi guys, was wondering if anyone on here could give me a bit of advice.

    I am a recent music graduate (July of this year) who has had a change of heart. Although it may seem like a pretty significant change in direction, I am now seriously considering applying to study medicine in the next few years, an idea which I have been toying with for some time.

    I am confident of my commitment to helping others (I am politically engaged, and the one thing preventing me from making an absolute decision on medicine at this point is my interest in international development and the possibility of working in foreign aid/international NGOs), my questions are regarding how best to prepare myself for application to medical schools given my academic background.

    Just a brief overview to help you guys out:

    First class degree in Music from Leeds College of Music (More prestigious than it sounds! Haha. Course split 50/50 between performance and academia, believe that I could obtain very positive references from my lecturers regarding my academic potential as I received an award for my dissertation).

    A Levels:
    A/B/B/a (English Lit/History/Music/Biology A at AS level, dropped it before A2)

    GCSEs:
    3 A* (two of which were for double award science) 3As, 2 Bs, 1 C.

    I am currently working as a HCA (been on an orthopaedic trauma ward for about two months) and really enjoying it. Being in a hospital environment encouraged my interest in medicine again after I had previously tried to dismiss the idea as unrealistic.

    Ideally, I would be looking to apply for medicine next year or the year after (for 2012/2013 entry), so if anyone has any advice on how I could strengthen my application/build upon my experience, or knows any arts (or even music!) graduates who have gone on to study medicine, then any information or opinions would be welcome. I am currently thinking that I would be best suited to the 6 year foundation courses, but the Clinical Sciences degree at Bradford that allows conversion to Leeds medicine also appeals.

    Basically I am interested in any views people have on the subject, so sound off as you like! And sorry for the long post .

    I'm an audio engineering graduate and I'm (hopefully) going to be going to Medical school in 2012.

    First and foremost get the idea of the clinical sciences conversion out of your head. It's nigh on impossible (most only take 1-2 a year) IMO you have a better chance getting into medicine straight away! Also with the fee hike it'll cost you a lot more for something you don't really need.

    Now the courses:

    As a graduate the most obvious one to do is the 4 year grad scheme. Although it's the most intense I think it's the most suitable. The best thing for you to do is to look through the TSR graduate medical schools above you ^ and look at their entry requirements. Around half will require you to have either a BSc or Sciences A level, so you can discard those.

    From there have a look the remaining courses, and how they're taught/structured. A common teaching method in grad programs is called PBL. This is essentially self-directed learning, or rather you're given a topic/disease to research and you present your findings (as opposed to a more formal lecture situation). All courses have a blending of both, some more PBL based than others.

    Once you've chosen the courses you like, look at the relevant entrance exams. There are 3 types, BMAT, UKCAT and GAMSAT. The first two are more aptitude based, while GAMSAT is a blend of essays, literature and science reasoning. Check out the Graduate medical thread here for more info.

    Apotoftea is also an arts graduate, and she'll be able to provide any advice that I've missed.

    In terms of work experience, keep at your HCA job for as long as you can, some courses require a minimum of a year, while St. George's (the course I'm aiming for) realistically expect you have at least 6 months clinical experience. Graduate entry medical experience is different from normal school leavers in that they expect it to be more care based (so what you're doing is ideal) so shadowing doctors is more of less useless.

    One last thing that should be mentioned is the tuition fee hike. You seem to be very passionate about wanting to study medicine, but don't forget it's a big financial commitment. You won't be able to get a tuition loan (however as it stands the NHS will pay for your course years 2-4 for a 4 year course and 5 for a 5 year, I don't know how 6 year courses work)

    So then for a 4 year course you'll have to pay the £9,000 for the first year yourself. For the 5 year course that means you have to raise £36,000 yourself! Don't let that put you off though, there is no definite word on the tuition fee increase for us yet (the government keep on pushing back the date of the relevant white paper)

    Anyway, welcome to TSR!
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    (Original post by winter_mute)
    I'm an audio engineering graduate and I'm (hopefully) going to be going to Medical school in 2012.
    Very good summary!

    PS: I accidently negged that post...too early! Will correct it when I can
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    A coursemate of mine is in the first term of graduate Medicine at KCL, so it's definitely doable. He didn't do Biology A Level at school so had to do it all in one year in his second year of uni. It's definitely doable! Good luck
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    Many thanks for that winter_mute, lots of useful information. Just out of interest, where did you study? And what kind of work experience do you have? (sorry if that seems invasive, I'm generally just curious, I didn't expect to get a response from someone in a similar situation so quickly!).

    (Original post by winter_mute)

    So then for a 4 year course you'll have to pay the £9,000 for the first year yourself. For the 5 year course that means you have to raise £36,000 yourself! Don't let that put you off though, there is no definite word on the tuition fee increase for us yet (the government keep on pushing back the date of the relevant white paper)
    This is certainly something to consider! Although having said that, if offered a place to study medicine I would be more than willing to take out career development loans/get myself in ludicrous amounts of debt, knowing that I would be entering a relatively lucrative profession. I think it would be worth living like a pauper for a few years to achieve a dream (apologies for the disgusting romanticised language...the sentiment is genuine though).

    The only other question I have is regarding how other graduate applicants from non science backgrounds have built up their scientific knowledge to an appropriate level (I'm thinking predominantly of those without science A levels here). Have people literally just worked their way through A level text books, or has anyone tried anything a bit more creative, or discovered any means of developing their scientific knowledge in a way which was a bit less general (i.e. has anyone developed their knowledge of science in way which is more relevant to medicine specifically).

    I'm glad I finally joined TSR!
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    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=1480412

    nice thread guise
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    (Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
    A coursemate of mine is in the first term of graduate Medicine at KCL, so it's definitely doable. He didn't do Biology A Level at school so had to do it all in one year in his second year of uni. It's definitely doable! Good luck
    Thanks . Did your friend study Chemistry as well then? I know that King's doesn't require specific A levels, did he just do Biology to prove that he had the potential to study science at a higher level? Just asking because I'm still weighing up the merits of gaining formal qualifications for science A levels vs just studying informally and applying anyway, seeing as a number of the graduate entry courses don't require them.
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    (Original post by MusicNow)
    Thanks . Did your friend study Chemistry as well then? I know that King's doesn't require specific A levels, did he just do Biology to prove that he had the potential to study science at a higher level? Just asking because I'm still weighing up the merits of gaining formal qualifications for science A levels vs just studying informally and applying anyway, seeing as a number of the graduate entry courses don't require them.
    I'm not entirely sure: I presumed that Biology A Level was a requirement he had to meet. If it wasn't, I can only imagine that he was trying to show commitment to the course or strengthen his chances, or avoid a foundation year if there is one? :dontknow: GEM is competitive at the best of times even if you have the science A Levels!
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    (Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
    I'm not entirely sure: I presumed that Biology A Level was a requirement he had to meet. If it wasn't, I can only imagine that he was trying to show commitment to the course or strengthen his chances, or avoid a foundation year if there is one? :dontknow: GEM is competitive at the best of times even if you have the science A Levels!
    For most GEM courses they won't look at your A level mark. In fact St. George's require you to have a 2:2 degree but don't take any of your academic qualifications into account. It's just GAMSAT to get an interview, relevant work experience and the interview itself.
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    (Original post by digitalis)
    PS: I accidently negged that post...too early! Will correct it when I can
    Haha. I repped it for ya.
 
 
 
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