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    Hey guys, for my A2revision im getting stuck on the meaning of these 2 words, eutrophication and leaching, im afraid that if the exam asks for definitions of these 2 words I wont know what to write, can anyone give me simple definitons that will work for my AQA unit 4 exam. Simple and easy to remember would be nice

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    (Original post by Eloades11)
    Hey guys, for my A2revision im getting stuck on the meaning of these 2 words, eutrophication and leaching, im afraid that if the exam asks for definitions of these 2 words I wont know what to write, can anyone give me simple definitons that will work for my AQA unit 4 exam. Simple and easy to remember would be nice

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    Leaching simply means that a solute is dissolved and carried by a solvent. In the case of the environment, nitrates and similar minerals in the soil from fertilizer dissolve in rain water and are carried by the water out of the soil to another location, such as a stream/river/lake/etc.

    Eutrophication refers to the harmful over-growth of organisms caused by excess nitrate etc., that leads to stagnation through out-competition for resources.
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    (Original post by Revd. Mike)
    Leaching simply means that a solute is dissolved and carried by a solvent. In the case of the environment, nitrates and similar minerals in the soil from fertilizer dissolve in rain water and are carried by the water out of the soil to another location, such as a stream/river/lake/etc.

    Eutrophication refers to the harmful over-growth of organisms caused by excess nitrate etc., that leads to stagnation through out-competition for resources.
    Thanks a lot,

    for the leaching, is it just the nitrates in the soil being dissolves in rain water and carried beyond the soil? I'm also looking at the book(which doesnt explain it well in my opinion) and it mentions problems that high nitrate levels in the rivers/lakes can cause, would that be part of the definition?

    and lastly eutrophication, the book has a page long explaination for it. But for your definition, would this be on the surface of the lake/river? And so algae grows on the bed? thats algal bloom right? and this causes a few problems......
    It seems pretty harsh if the exam asks for that definition
    thanks for your help again, you seem to be the only one helping me on tsr with biology
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    Sulphates can also be taken away by leaching. High nitrates in the water can cause algar blooms in the lake, this process causes and excess growth of algar on the top of the surface of the water. This growth blocks the light reaching the bottom of the lake killing lower plants. The algar then run out of nitrates and other nutrient and begin to die. Aerobic bacteria then break down the algar at a high rate using up all the oxygen in water of the lake killing the organisms living in the lake, destroying the ecosystem of the lake. This is eutrophication.

    Hope that makes sence? Quote me if it doesn't/
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    (Original post by Eloades11)
    Hey guys, for my A2revision im getting stuck on the meaning of these 2 words, eutrophication and leaching, im afraid that if the exam asks for definitions of these 2 words I wont know what to write, can anyone give me simple definitons that will work for my AQA unit 4 exam. Simple and easy to remember would be nice

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    Leaching - nutrients leave the soil (a problem when they move away from where they are most useful).

    If you're interested in the detail then what is happening is that ions (nutrients = calcium/magnesium etc...things plants need) are normally bound to soil molecules because of charge differences (the components of soil are negatively charged and ions positively charged). If you remember the 'reactivity series' from chemistry you'll know that more reactive ions displace less reactive ions. This is what happens here: commonly hydrogen ions displace the more useful ions like calcium and magnesium so they 'leach' because there is nothing holding them in the locality, whereas before the soil molecules were keeping them there. And as you probably know, hydrogen ions get there because of acid rain for example. As far as I know, nitrate leaching is slightly different in that the ions dissolve in water which is why they are 'leached'...

    Eutrophication - the process of nutrients being added to an area to a level where they are in excess (this causes problems like algal blooms). So leaching could cause this problem but so could a fertiliser barrel that is dumped in a river for example.
 
 
 
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