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    Hey guys and gals

    So I'm basically trying this out to see how it goes, considering starting something more serious on blogspot, but until then, let us continue...

    I'm mainly aiming to be competitive at 800m, 1500m, 3000m, 5k, 10k, although I may do the occasional odd-ball event that's outside of this (400m, 5 mile, 10 mile, etc.).

    I'm around the 40 miles per week mark at the moment, dropping it this week due to it being my easy week and coincidentally a **** week in terms of weather too. Also doing my core strength again (50 minute session today). Looking to build in weights at some point too.

    First topic of discussion: nutrition. I've got some chocolate milk that I'll be trying out with its holy 4:1 carb to protein ratio (*bows*) so we'll see if that leads to any improvement, psychological or not.

    Second topic of discussion: I'm considering going from 3 hard, 1 easy week to 2 hard, 1 easy, as this means I can really go for it in terms of mileage and also get a more regular rest. At the moment three weeks is a long time to be having just one day a week off, although I'm handling it fine. Perhaps 2 hard, 1 easy would give me more benefits; what do you do?

    Anyway, plenty more to come, please feel free to hijack, comment, ask questions, etc.
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    I'm just in to watch...

    I know squat about running and will just be using this as a chance to learn some more stuff off you...
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    Tweaked my core strength routine slightly; if anyone wants a copy then just quote me. I've always been told to start early in the winter and do it 2/3 times per week. Oh, and even these exercises need to be periodised (i.e. easy weeks too!).
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    [QUOTE=addylad;28752541]
    First topic of discussion: nutrition. I've got some chocolate milk that I'll be trying out with its holy 4:1 carb to protein ratio (*bows*) so we'll see if that leads to any improvement, psychological or not.

    Second topic of discussion: I'm considering going from 3 hard, 1 easy week to 2 hard, 1 easy, as this means I can really go for it in terms of mileage and also get a more regular rest. At the moment three weeks is a long time to be having just one day a week off, although I'm handling it fine. Perhaps 2 hard, 1 easy would give me more benefits; what do you do?

    QUOTE]

    I'm assuming that your milkshake is post recovery...
    I currently use whey and dextrose with either water, or blended with milk/ oats/ fruit after longer sessions, and have been taking that for months. I have noticed a definite difference in terms of recovery, and it's cheaper to blend your own than to buy the recovery shakes from running shops.

    I don't consciously cycle between weeks, though I probably should tbh. I can go 2 weeks without a rest day, but generally I try to have at least one per week, and I just go with how I feel. If I've had a particularly hard week in terms of mileage, racing or just other commitments then I'll take the next week a little easier and switch one run to swimming/cycling.

    The most obvious thing would be for you to try the 2 weeks hard, 1 easy for 2 months or so, and see how it works out.
    Or you could have 2 hardish weeks, 1 really hard week, and one easy week. You've just got to experiment and find out what works for you I guess

    Have you got any specific races coming up?
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    i suggest you focus your training on the 800m whilst you are still young. 3000m times will come when you are much older with no effort on the back of your shorter distance training so try not to focus too much on it. running 800m in under 2 minutes requires a 400m time of ~54s. 400m races therefore are required to see your progress and lots of anaerobic work will be needed in the spring and summer. if you can run 400m in only 60s you can do all the aerobic work you want in the winter but you'll never run better than 2.08 for the 800m. remember this mate. also pigeon please take a day off running every single week. you need the time to recover and you should be doing regular core work and strengthening training to injury proof the body. this should be done and it is more important than running. running is heavily associated with injuries and most of the time this can be avoided by sensible training.
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    *subscribes*

    I would like to post something intelligent or helpful here, but it's late, so I'll leave it at that
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    (Original post by Revenged)
    also pigeon please take a day off running every single week. you need the time to recover and you should be doing regular core work and strengthening training to injury proof the body. this should be done and it is more important than running. running is heavily associated with injuries and most of the time this can be avoided by sensible training.
    I do core work a few times a week, weight training (mainly compound lifts such as deadlifts, front/back squats etc.) once a week, and less frequently cross training too in order to minimise any muscle imbalances that arise from running. In particular I'm currently trying to strengthen my iliotibial band and hip flexors, as these are common problem areas in runners.
    When I said I can go two weeks without a rest day, that wasn't just solely running, and a lot of my mileage is done off-road, either on trails or in the Peaks; so although the uneven terrain is more demanding, it's less high impact than road running.

    Most weeks I do have a day off, but if I'm feeling good, and have little work then why not? Yes I push myself, but listening to your own body is more important in my opinion than simply doing what other people do, and *touch wood* I've kept injury free for years. I learnt a number of years ago to just listen to yourself, and to not let others set limits of what is possible because you never know unless you try. Had I listened to doctors I would never have got into running due to an underlying medical illness, but being stubborn (or pig headed :rolleyes:) has got me much further than I or anyone else expected.
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    (Original post by Revenged)
    i suggest you focus your training on the 800m whilst you are still young. 3000m times will come when you are much older with no effort on the back of your shorter distance training so try not to focus too much on it. running 800m in under 2 minutes requires a 400m time of ~54s. 400m races therefore are required to see your progress and lots of anaerobic work will be needed in the spring and summer. if you can run 400m in only 60s you can do all the aerobic work you want in the winter but you'll never run better than 2.08 for the 800m. remember this mate. also pigeon please take a day off running every single week. you need the time to recover and you should be doing regular core work and strengthening training to injury proof the body. this should be done and it is more important than running. running is heavily associated with injuries and most of the time this can be avoided by sensible training.
    Sounds good. Always been keen on 800m, but I'm pretty confident I can get around 54 s for 400m. At the moment, though, I need a strong aerobic base since that's generally been the problem for me. Probably won't start doing speedwork until Feb/March time.

    P.S. Had a fun track session today! I was told to get off near the end though, thanks to the council having closed it. It was covered in snow but I still managed a decent session.
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    i saw your comment on the other thread and it is very naive mate. 120 miles a week is complete nonsense. roger bannister ran under 4 minute mile when he was a medical student at oxford. he was doing running on the time he could spare from his studies and his training was very low and total intervals. i suspect on less miles than what you are doing now but the training then was much more intervals focused than now. i think this is the easiest way to progress. even if you take seb coe the best british middle distance runner, he is famous for not runner much. though as you know middle distance only run more miles in the winter then we cut it down completely in the spring. the real low mileagers are the sprinters and you may lose out to them if you get the mix wrong but in any case keep it sensible. long distance running has its risks and the better you get on the track you will come across the same overuse problems that tend to plague the amateur distance runners who try and run distances like marathons from no background as is the fashion now. you dont want this. good luck.
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    (Original post by Revenged)
    i saw your comment on the other thread and it is very naive mate. 120 miles a week is complete nonsense. roger bannister ran under 4 minute mile when he was a medical student at oxford. he was doing running on the time he could spare from his studies and his training was very low and total intervals. i suspect on less miles than what you are doing now but the training then was much more intervals focused than now. i think this is the easiest way to progress. even if you take seb coe the best british middle distance runner, he is famous for not runner much. though as you know middle distance only run more miles in the winter then we cut it down completely in the spring. the real low mileagers are the sprinters and you may lose out to them if you get the mix wrong but in any case keep it sensible. long distance running has its risks and the better you get on the track you will come across the same overuse problems that tend to plague the amateur distance runners who try and run distances like marathons from no background as is the fashion now. you dont want this. good luck.
    So there haven't been any elite runners running over 100 mpw? Okay then.

    Roger Bannister was exceptional. His whole philosophy was based on light training. He was sub 4.10 with very little training.

    That's always the plan; reduce the mileage and increase the intensity. Every runner needs a base. If I'm to do anything above 800m then I'll need more of a base anyway.
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    steve jones, the best english marathon runner in history, ran 80 miles a week for a 2.07 marathon. for the middle distance there is not such a strong case for mileage. many runners do run this much and they do not perform. particularly for middle distance the focus is on the sessions, which is precisely why we outperform the distance runners despite them having many times the volume of training. ultimately at the higher levels running becomes very self destructive with a high rate of injury which is why people only have a few good marathons in them and why i recommend you do not overdo mileage. it is up to you in the end.
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    Out of interest, what sort of times will you be hoping for 10k?
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    (Original post by iainthegreat)
    Out of interest, what sort of times will you be hoping for 10k?
    I'm not sure as of yet. Maybe around the 36:30 mark. Don't want to be crazily unrealistic as I'm training mainly for 800m/1500m.
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    Still getting out and running on a frozen field.
 
 
 
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