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    Would studying straight French at Uni be a disadvantage if I decide to go into a career involving languages? Should I study two languages?

    THANKS
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    Depends what you want to do. If you want to live and work just in France, having two languages might not be useful, but if you wanted to work for the EU in a language-related profession, you'd probably be expected to have at least two.
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    Obviously it'd put you at a disadvantage.
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    Most people I know doing languages are doing two, or combining it with something like European Studies or TEFL. If you want to work in the EU (and they're desperate) they require you to have two other languages, but if it's just a normal job here then French on its own is better than nothing.
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    It won't neccessarily disadvantage you but limit your choice of jobs I suppose although some jobs will teach you in other languages needed and so will be looking for language fluency and competence anyway. I also know that to be a translator you need to be fluent in at least 2 foreign languages other than your own.

    Hope this helped
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    I don't think it would be too much of a disadvantage. I only study German and I've been offered a job already.
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    I've opted for 2 or 3 either Spanish & German or Spanish, french & German - hopefully I'll cope ok as I can already speak Spanish. Good to know that you've found a job using your German - it's the one I'm most keen on.
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    I only study one language at uni and sometimes I worry about the same thing. I didn't have too much of a choice though, as I didn't have an A level in a language... I'm not overly worried, as Russian is rarer than most languages, but it will limit me somewhat when it comes to getting a job.

    I think it's a good idea to do two languages if you have an A level in one already, as it does broaden your options in the future. If you really are only interested in France/French though, don't force yourself to do another language - you'll probably lack the commitment to do well in it if you're not very interested in the country.
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    The fact you do only one language wouldn't necessarily put you at a disadvantage. The truth is, the more languages you study, the harder it is to keep a good level at it and the harder to go more in-depth.
    Focusing on one language would be an advantage if you use this opportunity adequately in order to have a better French than others who studied two languages. Obviously it limits you career options to French-English relations, but I believe in those cases you would have an advantage on people studying 2+ (unless they're geniuses)
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    (Original post by Xurvi)
    The fact you do only one language wouldn't necessarily put you at a disadvantage. The truth is, the more languages you study, the harder it is to keep a good level at it and the harder to go more in-depth.
    Focusing on one language would be an advantage if you use this opportunity adequately in order to have a better French than others who studied two languages. Obviously it limits you career options to French-English relations, but I believe in those cases you would have an advantage on people studying 2+ (unless they're geniuses)
    This. I mean, I know people doing 3 languages and they're really struggling. Plus, French is such an international language you're not limited just to France itself.
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    Plus you can always pick up electives in other languages whilst you do your straight French degree, so the option to learn others is still there
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    thanks for the replies guys, i only want to go into journalism but i'd love the opportunity to work as a foreign correspondant which is why i have the dilemma...
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    IMO yes you would be limiting yourself. I can see the advantages of sole languages degrees in the case of more difficult, complex languages that are generally taken from beginners level, as it would be very difficult, near impossible, to successfully study say, both Arabic and Mandarin, or Arabic and another demanding subject such as Law. In this case, it makes sense to study just the one language so you can really concentrate on and immerse yourself in it, and you have the whole of your year abroad dedicated to that language too. As the language is rarer and more in demand, only having one isn't usually limiting.

    In the case of French, however, a language which you have presumably already been studying for around 8 years and are therefore fairly competent in, I would argue that it's different. You say "a career involving languages" - the main three careers requiring languages are interpeting, translating and teaching. In all three it is a definite advantage to be able to offer more than one foreign tongue, particularly if the one you are offering is fairly common. If you don't want to study another language, then I would definitely consider putting another subject with it. Journalism is very competitive, and while I've never looked into it myself I imagine lots of people going for the foreign correspondant jobs not only speak French but have other skills to offer too, whether that be another language (or indeed languages, plural) or political/historical/legal etc knowledge. You have to bear in mind that French is the most popular foreign language learned by English speakers, so any language jobs requiring competency in French are going to have a lot of candidates. The successful ones will be those that have something else that makes them stand out
 
 
 
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