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    I have my LNAT coming up and I'm very worried!! Please could I have some advice on what you think of this? It would be unbelievably appreciated!

    Surveillance cameras have no useful purpose and no place in a free and open society.' Discuss.

    Privacy is possbily the one thing that people hold most dear. People feel that they have an inherent right to privacy and feel rightfully violated when this is invaded. So, the thought of being watched, photographed and monitored in every move is a concept that the majority would deplore. However, the argument that perhaps holds more credability is that, in the interests of public safety, if you have nothing to hide then you have nothing to fear.
    The obvious advantage to suveillance cameras such as CCTV, speed cameras etc, is the positive impact it has on crime rates. As well as acting as a significant detterent for any potential criminals, the ability to track criminals down is another enormous benefit to this increase in technology. Images of Holly Wells and Jessica Chapman buying sweets from a petrol station, hours before they were murdered, helped the Police create a picture of the girls movements which eventually led them their murderer. In this case, like in so many others, surveillance cameras aided the police in capturing a dangerous individual and bringing him to justice. With such incomprehendable benefits, it would be difficult to dispute that safety should override the right to a 'free' society.
    Unsuprisingly, surveillance techniques have their critics, who stir up fear of a 'Big Brother' society where no-one can hide. One can admit that there are examples of when surveillance has gone to far. The uproar following the creation of Google Earth highlights the human instinct for protecting their right to a private life. Images of people in their front windows, walking down the street or gardening on their property were widely seen as an uninvited invasion of personal areas. A recent article suggested that Google Earth captured a young woman giving birth on a German street. Surely this is beyond acceptable surveillance?
    However, if this woman was instead being mugged and Google Earth captured an image of the criminal, one could almost certainly say there wouldn't be much opposition to this surveillance, providing of course, that you're not a criminal yourself!
    It is understandable that people feel violated if their every move, on every street corner, in every city, is documented, perhaps creating a sense of victimisation of the innocent. There is always a case for respecting privacy by preventing or removing any excessive surveillance techniques. However, the idea of a surveillence society is, frankly, absolute nonsense. It would take half of the population to watch the other half of the population. But then who would watch the watchers? There would always be an element of privacy that couldn't be touched.
    Yes surveillance should have an element of restriction. Google Earth is great if you're perhaps looking for a house up for sale or trying to get an idea of directions to a destination. But, it's not so great if it shows a detailed picture of the security of a property, creating unnecessary vulnerablity and danger for those being 'watched'.
    It would be easy to say that surveillance should be carefully monitored to ensure that it provides adequate information and safety without overstepping the mark. Yet, in saying this, wouldn't this be suggesting that we surveillance surveillance technology? It is enough to make your mind boggle! I prefer a much more simple argument saying if you're doing nothing wrong, then you have nothing to hide.
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    A minor pointer; faces are automatically blurred by Google Earth's imaging software.
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    Thank you very much I wasn't aware of this so very helpful info!
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    if I got 4 A*s at A level and a pretty good Personal Statement e.g. work for an MP and have done loads of work experience, should I still be really worried about my LNAT score?
 
 
 
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