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Doorway pull up bar confusion Watch

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    After quitting gymnastics a couple of years ago, and the gym last year, I really need to get my upper body strength back. I'm going back to pole dancing in January as well as my gym membership starting then in order to get more progress out of pole dance. In my gymnastics days I know several people had a pull up bar in their doorway. It was like this but I'm confused about it not needing screws? Because my friend's did, and I'm no good at DIY. Won't that bar fall down?

    And don't get me started on this. Won't that rotate? where are you meant to hold on? What's that black bit for at the top?

    If anyone has any experience of these please reply.
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    (Original post by microfatcat)
    After quitting gymnastics a couple of years ago, and the gym last year, I really need to get my upper body strength back. I'm going back to pole dancing in January as well as my gym membership starting then in order to get more progress out of pole dance. In my gymnastics days I know several people had a pull up bar in their doorway. It was like this but I'm confused about it not needing screws? Because my friend's did, and I'm no good at DIY. Won't that bar fall down?
    Probably.

    Most are adjustable to fit different door frames but you still need to fit brackets to attach and anchor the bar.

    And don't get me started on this. Won't that rotate? where are you meant to hold on? What's that black bit for at the top?
    It works by using a cantilever - they do 'work' but they aren't adjustable and only fit certain doorframe dimensions with plenty of clearance around them, without a window over the top, etc. Best avoided really.

    If anyone has any experience of these please reply.
    Just get a cheap bog standard bar:

    http://www.argos.co.uk/static/Produc...er/3003341.htm

    ...and use the brackets that come provided - they're not difficult to fit and you end up with a much more robust bar.
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    I have the bar in the second of your links, it's really good. The black bit at the top is what you put on the door frame. I recommend it.
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    My mate has one of the first ones. It doesn't fall down.
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    (Original post by RNBen)
    My mate has one of the first ones. It doesn't fall down.
    Is it not screwed on?
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    (Original post by microfatcat)
    Is it not screwed on?
    No, what you do is twist both sides until they are wide enough to keep it tight in the frame. Trust me, do it enough and it won't come down. I way 13 stone and can use it.
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    (Original post by RNBen)
    No, what you do is twist both sides until they are wide enough to keep it tight in the frame. Trust me, do it enough and it won't come down. I way 13 stone and can use it.
    And this doesn't hurt the door frame?

    You're converting me
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    (Original post by microfatcat)
    And this doesn't hurt the door frame?

    You're converting me
    It will obviously leave a couple of small indentations in the door frame but nothing that will cause too much damage. At the end of the day, if you purchase one with screws you get two holes in the door frame, etc. All have pros and cons. The good thing with this one though is the mobility of it, you can take it to any new accommodation you may find yourself in, and thus, can keep doing your exercises when on holiday etc.

    If you don't like it of course, you could get a refund.
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    (Original post by RNBen)
    It will obviously leave a couple of small indentations in the door frame but nothing that will cause too much damage.
    ...and damage the paintwork.

    At the end of the day, if you purchase one with screws you get two holes in the door frame, etc.
    ...which takes a matter of minutes to rectify (ie; a dab of polyfiller and white gloss). Frankly you're going to do some minor damage to the doorway irrespective of what you use but a bar with screw in brackets is a cheaper investment in the first place and significantly stronger.

    The good thing with this one though is the mobility of it, you can take it to any new accommodation you may find yourself in, and thus, can keep doing your exercises when on holiday etc.
    The problem is that in practice they fit very few doors which negates pretty much any portability/mobility aspect.
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    (Original post by ch0c0h01ic)
    ...and damage the paintwork.



    ...which takes a matter of minutes to rectify (ie; a dab of polyfiller and white gloss). Frankly you're going to do some minor damage to the doorway irrespective of what you use but a bar with screw in brackets is a cheaper investment in the first place and significantly stronger.



    The problem is that in practice they fit very few doors which negates pretty much any portability/mobility aspect.
    1) Personally, I don't see the minimal damage they actually do as a huge reason to not get one.

    2) Yes, it may be stronger, but I was merely giving my opinion on a device I have actual experience using, except for knowing the alternative uses screws I will not comment on anything else regarding it.

    3) Unless you use a door suitable for wheelchairs I see no real issue. Most doors, nowadays, are a standard width. The bar can be adjusted and thus, if there are any minor differences it can be altered to suit said requirements. My friend used one at home and has used it in 3 different accommodations since.
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    (Original post by microfatcat)
    After quitting gymnastics a couple of years ago, and the gym last year, I really need to get my upper body strength back. I'm going back to pole dancing in January as well as my gym membership starting then in order to get more progress out of pole dance. In my gymnastics days I know several people had a pull up bar in their doorway. It was like this but I'm confused about it not needing screws? Because my friend's did, and I'm no good at DIY. Won't that bar fall down?

    And don't get me started on this. Won't that rotate? where are you meant to hold on? What's that black bit for at the top?

    If anyone has any experience of these please reply.
    :perv:
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    (Original post by RNBen)
    3) Unless you use a door suitable for wheelchairs I see no real issue. Most doors, nowadays, are a standard width. The bar can be adjusted and thus, if there are any minor differences it can be altered to suit said requirements. My friend used one at home and has used it in 3 different accommodations since.
    Actually most aren't and width isn't the only issue. If the door has a small window above it (like most 60s/70s houses) you can't use it, if the door frame has no clearance around it (eg; it's in a hallway) it won't fit, if it's an old house with thick walls, it won't fit, if the frame has been recessed into the wall, it won't fit, etc.

    I've used something similar before and out of the 10s of doorways I've had around me it's fitted a handful.
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    (Original post by ch0c0h01ic)
    Actually most aren't and width isn't the only issue. If the door has a small window above it (like most 60s/70s houses) you can't use it, if the door frame has no clearance around it (eg; it's in a hallway) it won't fit, if it's an old house with thick walls, it won't fit, if the frame has been recessed into the wall, it won't fit, etc.

    I've used something similar before and out of the 10s of doorways I've had around me it's fitted a handful.
    You seem to think I am recommending something I am not...?

    I am recommending the bar which you twist out, extending its length. The above reasons you have given have no effect on whether said bar can be used or not.
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    (Original post by RNBen)
    You seem to think I am recommending something I am not...?

    I am recommending the bar which you twist out, extending its length. The above reasons you have given have no effect on whether said bar can be used or not.
    My bad, I thought you were talking about the cantilever designs.
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    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Pull-Up-Bar/...sr=1-3-catcorr

    As long as you aren't in a **** hole, that works just fine and the extra inches it allows is really useful to get your feet off the ground.
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    I'd say forget the poledancing and lift some weights, or take up a martial art or something. Poledancing seems like an ineffective waste of time, like people who do 500 crunches a day and nothing else.
 
 
 
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