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    Hey, guys. I'm going to study Economics in Great Britain, so I'm interested in some specific degrees provided. Well, I found those three degrees(Economics/Business Economics/Economics and Politics) and I have few questions. Well I would like to ask, what Economics and Politics degree is all about? Is there Politics science mixed with economics etc.? What does this degree means? I almost understand, but I would like to hear other people thoughts. So other thing is Economics/ Bussiness Economics. What's the difference between these degrees? And finally, I know that it's so individual, but with regard to the future prospects, which degree would you take?

    Thank you people so much, you would help to solve the big problem.
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    future prospects: straight economics.
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    Don't mistake Econ & Pol for Political economics, very different. I would compare modules lists of each course, that should give you a good idea.
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    (Original post by danny111)
    future prospects: straight economics.
    Do you have any detailed figures as to why a straight economics degree over a joint economics degree, just interested
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    (Original post by SPMS)
    Do you have any detailed figures as to why a straight economics degree over a joint economics degree, just interested
    Common sense.

    Do a Bachelor in Economics.
    Get a Master in Public Policy, or Business, or Finance
    ???
    Profit
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    (Original post by Krov)
    Common sense.

    Do a Bachelor in Economics.
    Get a Master in Public Policy, or Business, or Finance
    ???
    Profit
    Wow thanks.
    I was just thinking Economics and Managemet, PPE etc. what is there to suggest that the OP's joint degree options are worse off than straight economics?
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    (Original post by SPMS)
    Wow thanks.
    I was just thinking Economics and Managemet, PPE etc. what is there to suggest that the OP's joint degree options are worse off than straight economics?
    Staying as pure to Economics as you can is always the best option*

    Spoiler:
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    *For someone who is serious about economics
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    (Original post by yoyo462001)
    Staying as pure to Economics as you can is always the best option*

    Spoiler:
    Show
    *For someone who is serious about economics
    I was just curious as to why danny11 would say straight economics is better for 'future prospects' that is why I was curious as to some figures to suggest joint degrees are worse in some way.
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    (Original post by SPMS)
    I was just curious as to why danny11 would say straight economics is better for 'future prospects' that is why I was curious as to some figures to suggest joint degrees are worse in some way.
    Joint degrees aren't worse in general. Economics and Maths is a good one.

    Other than that, Economics is just more respected than econ with/and ... there are probably figures for this (e.g. average starting salary) but I don't have those. You could find them though if you wanted.
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    Oh, thanks a lot for so much answers, because I'm finishing to fill in my UCAS form, but courses part is still empty. I was as well thinking about choosing straight Economics, it sounds more 'seriously', so I hope I wouldn't make no mistake. But there's an opportunity to choose joint degree in 2nd or 3rd year?

    And one more thing. That's what I found in one university website, about learning Economics, but there's not mentioned for which degree this studying plan is.

    'In your first year you will study Economics 1A and a short introductory computer skills course. You will also study two courses of your choice from other academic areas of the University. Economics 1A is accessible to those who have not previously studied economics, but the structure also means that it is challenging to those who have.
    Year 2

    In Year 2 you will study Economics 2, which builds on your knowledge from Year 1. You will also study Issues in Global Economics and choose two outside courses of your choice.
    Year 3

    You will start to study core Economics topics in more detail and will be introduced to econometrics. You will take a further two Economics courses or, if you are studying for a joint honours degree, you will take two courses from your other subject area.
    Year 4

    In your final year you will be able to choose from a wide range of specialist courses including The History of Economic Thought, The Economics of Developing Countries, The Economics of the Environment and Policy and Strategic Behaviour. You will also complete an honours dissertation.'
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    (Original post by Paulotr)
    Oh, thanks a lot for so much answers, because I'm finishing to fill in my UCAS form, but courses part is still empty. I was as well thinking about choosing straight Economics, it sounds more 'seriously', so I hope I wouldn't make no mistake. But there's an opportunity to choose joint degree in 2nd or 3rd year?

    And one more thing. That's what I found in one university website, about learning Economics, but there's not mentioned for which degree this studying plan is.

    'In your first year you will study Economics 1A and a short introductory computer skills course. You will also study two courses of your choice from other academic areas of the University. Economics 1A is accessible to those who have not previously studied economics, but the structure also means that it is challenging to those who have.
    Year 2

    In Year 2 you will study Economics 2, which builds on your knowledge from Year 1. You will also study Issues in Global Economics and choose two outside courses of your choice.
    Year 3

    You will start to study core Economics topics in more detail and will be introduced to econometrics. You will take a further two Economics courses or, if you are studying for a joint honours degree, you will take two courses from your other subject area.
    Year 4

    In your final year you will be able to choose from a wide range of specialist courses including The History of Economic Thought, The Economics of Developing Countries, The Economics of the Environment and Policy and Strategic Behaviour. You will also complete an honours dissertation.'
    Sounds like a Scottish uni since it's 4 years. I'd imagine MA Economics.
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    Yap, you are absolutely right. So do I make the right choice choosing MA(bachelor) straight Economics instead of all those joint degrees mentioned? From my point of view, I think it's a good idea, but it's always interesting to hear people who study this subject.
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    (Original post by Paulotr)
    Hey, guys. I'm going to study Economics in Great Britain, so I'm interested in some specific degrees provided. Well, I found those three degrees(Economics/Business Economics/Economics and Politics) and I have few questions. Well I would like to ask, what Economics and Politics degree is all about? Is there Politics science mixed with economics etc.? What does this degree means? I almost understand, but I would like to hear other people thoughts. So other thing is Economics/ Bussiness Economics. What's the difference between these degrees? And finally, I know that it's so individual, but with regard to the future prospects, which degree would you take?

    Thank you people so much, you would help to solve the big problem.
    Economics and politics simply means you're required to fulfill a certain number of credits in the economics and politics departments. That's it...

    I would totally do this over the other two (in fact I did). Sure you might end up a bit more mediocre in each discipline than people doing straight degrees, but I felt like I got more mileage out of it in the end. Also, having a number of different subjects from year one was also one of the things keeping me sane.
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    (Original post by drive like june)
    Economics and politics simply means you're required to fulfill a certain number of credits in the economics and politics departments. That's it...

    I would totally do this over the other two (in fact I did). Sure you might end up a bit more mediocre in each discipline than people doing straight degrees, but I felt like I got more mileage out of it in the end. Also, having a number of different subjects from year one was also one of the things keeping me sane.
    This.

    At the end of the day, do what interests you most. Otherwise studying for three years can get frustrating.
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    Well, I've decided to choose straight economics and that's it, I think it's the best choice to fulfil my desires
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    Hey, I have one more question. Economics / Economics and Finance / Financial Economics? What would you choose
    and why? There's nothing written about specific course, so I'm just interested what's the difference. Economics and Finance means that I'm going to study more mathematics, counts, and that my future work would be more related to something 'mathematical' ?
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    I have a shortage of time, but I can't decide which course I should choose :/
 
 
 
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