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    I was wondering what careers are available like just to do with biology mainly, so not involving chemistry?
    So apart from the normal, doctors, dentists, opticians, pharmacists, etcc
    I only have biology at a level out of the sciences and wanted to know what i could do, say with a biology/biomedical degree? apart from teaching?
    And, what is a clinical scientist? Like the nhs scheme, how does that work?

    Any help would be appreciated
    Thankyou!
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    Clinical scientists carry out the scientific services within the NHS. It varies from field to field, but for the biologies it mainly carrying out tests and advising doctors to help choose the correct treatments. There are plenty of biology fields in CS, inc. microbiology, genetics, immunology, haematology, histocompatibility & immunogenetics (transplantation science), embryology etc., so there's plenty of scope. The main role of CSs is to interpret test results, and then give a clear answer to the doctors so they are best informed how to proceed (i.e. although many tests will give complex results, CSs will need to give a yes/no answer so that there is no confusion down the line).

    The NHS training scheme has changed from the 2011 intake onwards, so it may change a bit more by the time you've finished your degree. Up to this year the training involved 3 years in the job with a logbook to fill in to prove competence. From next year they are doing a different thing with modules and project and things... I don't really understand it but it seems to be pretty much the same thing as before but with a different logbook. The NHS say this will help standardise the training, but whether it works in practice is yet to be seen. There have been some criticisms of the change, so all anyone can do is wait and see.
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    Oh right, i see, thanks

    And, oh i see, so to get onto this training scheme you obviously need an undergraduate degree right? is it competitve to get on it? so after you have trained on it, you become a qualified clinical scientist? What is the other route to doing this, a phd?

    Thanks
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    (Original post by diesha)
    Oh right, i see, thanks

    And, oh i see, so to get onto this training scheme you obviously need an undergraduate degree right? is it competitve to get on it? so after you have trained on it, you become a qualified clinical scientist? What is the other route to doing this, a phd?

    Thanks
    After the 3 years of training you are qualified in the particular field. There is then an extra year to become HPC accredited, which proves you are competent and can take responsibility for your choices, and with that accreditation you are a qualified State Reg Clinical Scientist.

    It's very competitive, this year many fields had 100-200 applicants per job. You can get in after a degree (it helps to have done a sandwich year to pick up some practical experience), but it's good to have a MSc or PhD. It varies from lab to lab though, some will only shortlist the best of the best (and so end up only interviewing people with PhDs), others give new graduates a chance and look for people with enthusiasm rather than extensive knowledge. In the H&I lab where I work it's about 50:50 for people entering as graduates and postgrads.

    Competition shouldn't put anyone off though. With 100+ applicants it's very easy to just miss out, so perseverance is key.
 
 
 
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