What programming language is taught at your university?

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A-K-J
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#1
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#1
If your studying computer science what programming language did your university start off with.

Univeristy:
Programming language:
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TheWakeUpCall
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#2
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#2
Bristol

C and then Java then Haskell


Knowing C is probably the most valuable thing in programming you could ever learn. Other uni's avoid it and wait until like the last term to teach it. Such a mistake.
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alex-hs
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#3
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#3
Uni of Nottingham

When I started, it was Java. From this year it's C, followed by Java, and then C++ in semesters 1, 2, and 3.

They still teach Haskell as a functional language.
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AugustWestie
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#4
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#4
Lancaster University
Java in the first year and then mainly C in second and third years.
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A-K-J
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#5
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Thanks for the replies, the i universities i been looking at dont mention which language but i guess java is a common one.

Anyone else?
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Chrosson
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#6
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#6
(Original post by TheWakeUpCall)
Bristol

C and then Java then Haskell

Knowing C is probably the most valuable thing in programming you could ever learn. Other uni's avoid it and wait until like the last term to teach it. Such a mistake.
Would you mind expanding on this and your reasoning for promoting C as a language to learn early? I don't necessarily disagree, but I've heard arguments for pretty much the reverse order to the one you've listed above (I'm guessing that by 'last term' you mean last term of first year?)
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Exopaladin
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#7
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#7
University of Kent
Java in the first year, Haskell, SQL (if you want to count that as a programming language) in the second year. Optional 2nd/3rd year modules for C, PHP, scripting on *nix (perl, bash).

I should clarify actually, that's the new way of doing things at my uni. When I started it was Java + Haskell in the first year, PHP and SQL in the 2nd year, optional 2nd/3rd year modules for C/*nix scripting
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Sally <3 Howl
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#8
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#8
University of Central Lancashire
C++
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Mad Vlad
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#9
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#9
Coventry
C++, C and Java
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Broderss
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#10
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#10
(Original post by A-K-J)
Thanks for the replies, the i universities i been looking at dont mention which language but i guess java is a common one.

Anyone else?
I think you can expect most unis to teach Java because it's easy to learn.
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NS17
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#11
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#11
University of the West of England

Java, PHP5, C, ASM and Perl5. I'm currently involved in projects that use all of these languages. I seriously hope I don't have to learn any more until next year.
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Miss Mary
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#12
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#12
University of Buenos Aires :P

Python, then C, then Java. And I think that's about it.

EDIT: and IBM Assembler.
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ch0llima
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#13
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#13
At the two undergrad courses I've done:

University of St Andrews: Java in first year, HTML/XHTML/CSS. Optional PHP depending on which second module you took. Second year: more Java, C, HUGS (A Haskell environment for formal logic specifications) and MIPS assembly, MySQL syntax

University of Dundee: Java, HTML/XHTML/CSS, ActionScript :facepalm2:, VB 2005, ASP.Net, C, C++, C#, PHP, JSP, BASH scripting, Python, MSSQL syntax

Not all of these are languages in their own right, obviously.
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TheWakeUpCall
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#14
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#14
(Original post by Chrosson)
Would you mind expanding on this and your reasoning for promoting C as a language to learn early? I don't necessarily disagree, but I've heard arguments for pretty much the reverse order to the one you've listed above (I'm guessing that by 'last term' you mean last term of first year?)
OK, well maybe last term was a bit of an exaggeration, though when I was looking at unis, c wasn't taught until the end of the course (last couple years, if that). From other peoples' responses though it seems like that has changed.

As for the reasons behind learning C early, as C was a very early language, most other languages are influenced by it. Understanding pointers is fundamental to know how to program efficiently. That includes Java. I don't understand how people can see what Java references are doing without knowing about the pointers underneath.

It also means you can start learning languages like C++ and objective-C earlier and so will have more experience with them when you need them.
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Planto
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#15
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#15
At Leeds they teach Python in the only programming-dedicated course, but other courses use Java, C, C++, Haskell, Matlab, Prolog, Lisp etc.

Works fine for me, but some people managed to get to third year with only a very basic grasp of Python and are completely stumped when it comes to anything beyond basic high-level scripting. :dontknow:
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orionmoo
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#16
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#16
Well I do the MCS course here, so in my first year I only took the two programming modules - both of which were Java (Fundamentals in OOP, then software engineering stuff). 2nd year now and I take a few more computing modules but soft engineering is still in Java, AI is using Java and Matlab, and for Web Apps we learnt JavaScript and again Java. The normal computing students learned HTML and CSS in their first year which was used in Web Apps too, but use MCS students had to basically self teach ourselves it. I presume the third year for us will be.. yep Java again, but I know for Computing students there's an optional module in C++ (But it's run by the engineering department, not computing...).

I think first year computing also learns a Functional Language too, but I'm not precisely sure which
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Chrosson
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#17
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#17
(Original post by TheWakeUpCall)
OK, well maybe last term was a bit of an exaggeration, though when I was looking at unis, c wasn't taught until the end of the course (last couple years, if that). From other peoples' responses though it seems like that has changed.

As for the reasons behind learning C early, as C was a very early language, most other languages are influenced by it. Understanding pointers is fundamental to know how to program efficiently. That includes Java. I don't understand how people can see what Java references are doing without knowing about the pointers underneath.

It also means you can start learning languages like C++ and objective-C earlier and so will have more experience with them when you need them.
Seems fair. It's also been brought to my attention that I've quoted you repeatedly and it probably seems like I'm stalking you. I assure you this isn't the case. I assume something about your posts prods some kind of nerve.
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ExcessNeo
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#18
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#18
University of East Anglia
Language: C++ (Foundation year), Java (Normal first year).

At least I think they only really cover Java in the normal first year, not 100% sure.
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laser
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#19
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#19
University of York
Scheme, then Ada (but now they teach Java) and after that it's dependent on what modules you take, but normally C and Alloy, but also maybe Haskell, Assembler, Python...
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Empire08
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#20
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#20
Newcastle University - Java
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