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    Hi
    I want to start running just around the block, not too loose weight but to improve my cardiovascular system. I normally training in heart rate zones 70 - 80% max heart rate. Anyways I normally use the Heart rate monitor but know need a budget heart rate monitor, with just two functions heart rate and some sort of alarm when im training above/below the limits.

    I know there is otherways of doing aerobic excercise but I just get a special buzz from running.Feel free to leave any other usefel tips about running
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    Do sprints
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    I don't really know what cardiovascular system means. But if your end goal is to run faster or for longer (Or both). I was told you need to get a lot of slower miles in there rather than solely sprint work. I'm sure someone who knows what they're talking about will come along soon so this can just be a bump
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    I find a good cardio, will vastly improve your odds in a zombie epidemic.
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    So you want to train your cardiovascular system as in stamina - be able to run longer and more etc. and do something good for your heart and overall health? I use a really crappy heart rate monitor, it just has the heart rate and this beeping/alarm you asked for, and it's perfect for me. Though I rather train on an ergometric. Just look that you don't overdo, just start slowly and then increase the level step by step. And, running shoes are a good investment if you buy the right ones. Otherwise you may have problems with your koints/knees, especially IF you run on pavement or other hard grounds.
    But, have fun! Sport is a good thing, if you are not to hard on yourself.

    Lin
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    (Original post by a_t)
    Do sprints
    Agreed, if you want to get fitter i.e stregnthen your heart then interval training is is the best. This means sprint full pelt for say a 1.5 minutes then rest for a 1 minute and repeat. Obviously depending on your fitness you will have to adjust the amount of time you sprint and rest to what suits your level of fitness. About 20-40 min of this 3-4 times a week and you'll be fitter in no time. And inteval training is much better than a long drawn out jog.

    EDITDIT: OK since everyone is complaining about me saying run full pelt, i mean't to say run at a fast but sustainable pace. There is no point doing interval training at a pace that you could run for half an hour at.
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    HIIT
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    (Original post by Law123mus)
    Agreed, if you want to get fitter i.e stregnthen your heart then interval training is is the best. This means sprint full pelt for say a 1.5 minutes then rest for a 1 minute and repeat. Obviously depending on your fitness you will have to adjust the amount of time you sprint and rest to what suits your level of fitness. About 20-40 min of this 3-4 times a week and you'll be fitter in no time. And inteval training is much better than a long drawn out jog.
    lol you can't sprint for 90 seconds though! More like 30 seconds if you're going full pelt
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    (Original post by a_t)
    lol you can't sprint for 90 seconds though! More like 30 seconds if you're going full pelt
    Yeah well maybe not full pelt. But I like to start off fast and try and finish at a fast pace. As long as you keep going for that 90 seconds.
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    (Original post by Law123mus)
    Agreed, if you want to get fitter i.e stregnthen your heart then interval training is is the best. This means sprint full pelt for say a 1.5 minutes then rest for a 1 minute and repeat. Obviously depending on your fitness you will have to adjust the amount of time you sprint and rest to what suits your level of fitness. About 20-40 min of this 3-4 times a week and you'll be fitter in no time. And inteval training is much better than a long drawn out jog.
    Awful advice.

    Interval training is the best? No, a varied program which addresses all of the energy systems is best. Interval training is just one component of a fitness plan. Going from nothing to 90 second sprints with an unrealistic rest is just asking for injuries.

    Your best bet is starting with three workouts a week:
    1. Do half a mile warming up at an easy pace followed by dynamic stretches, and then 3 x 1k with 3 mins walk recovery. Post your times and then it gives an idea of your current level of fitness. Then do half a mile warm down and some static stretches. I can give you more sessions as mine vary an awful lot.
    2. Do an easy two mile run without stopping, and see how it feels. If it's okay add half a mile on every other week. The aim of this is to build endurance and aid recovery without impacting your other sessions. When you get to four miles, start thinking about adding another run in of this type, and do two three mile runs instead, again, building up to four miles each.
    3. Do a weekly long run at a pace which feels extremely comfortable. I mean 'able to talk'. Start off low and increase it gradually until you're doing six miles. This should feel easy most of the way through, but slightly challenging towards the end.

    Once you have an aerobic base you can then start to worry about core strength, weights, plyometrics, speedwork, fartlek, anaerobic threshold running, etc. This period for 90% of runners is to increase the aerobic base so that when you start upping the mileage, your body doesn't break down.

    Good luck.
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    (Original post by addylad)
    Awful advice.

    Interval training is the best? No, a varied program which addresses all of the energy systems is best. Interval training is just one component of a fitness plan. Going from nothing to 90 second sprints with an unrealistic rest is just asking for injuries.

    Your best bet is starting with three workouts a week:
    1. Do half a mile warming up at an easy pace followed by dynamic stretches, and then 3 x 1k with 3 mins walk recovery. Post your times and then it gives an idea of your current level of fitness. Then do half a mile warm down and some static stretches. I can give you more sessions as mine vary an awful lot.
    2. Do an easy two mile run without stopping, and see how it feels. If it's okay add half a mile on every other week. The aim of this is to build endurance and aid recovery without impacting your other sessions. When you get to four miles, start thinking about adding another run in of this type, and do two three mile runs instead, again, building up to four miles each.
    3. Do a weekly long run at a pace which feels extremely comfortable. I mean 'able to talk'. Start off low and increase it gradually until you're doing six miles. This should feel easy most of the way through, but slightly challenging towards the end.

    Once you have an aerobic base you can then start to worry about core strength, weights, plyometrics, speedwork, fartlek, anaerobic threshold running, etc. This period for 90% of runners is to increase the aerobic base so that when you start upping the mileage, your body doesn't break down.

    Good luck.

    Awful advice? And i never said it shouldn't be part of a varied workout, i was just giving one example. Ofcourse you need to warm up, I assumed the op would already know this. And I only said 1 minute rest as an example, i also said vary your running and rest time with your level of fitness. The 1.5 minute run with 1 minute rest is just the way i do it. I started off at a 30-40 second run and rested for about 2-3 minutes. Also i got this training advice from the royal marine commando website, hardly bad advice.
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    (Original post by Law123mus)
    Awful advice? And i never said it shouldn't be part of a varied workout, i was just giving one example. Ofcourse you need to warm up, I assumed the op would already know this. And I only said 1 minute rest as an example, i also said vary your running and rest time with your level of fitness. The 1.5 minute run with 1 minute rest is just the way i do it. I started off at a 30-40 second run and rested for about 2-3 minutes. Also i got this training advice from the royal marine commando website, hardly bad advice.
    It was a bad example; a 90s sprint with 1 min rest wouldn't even be done pre-competition. Nobody would run at maximal effort with such a recovery. If you suggest that workout to him in the middle of winter, and he goes and does it, he's got a great chance of getting injured. Just because you got it from a 'royal marine commando' Web site, it doesn't make it any better then anyone else's advice.

    Do you understand the reason behind running 30-40 seconds with 2-3 minutes rest? No, you're advising him to do it for the sake of it. If you're going to give advice about running at least understand a little of the physiology behind it first, and embark on a structured program so you can speak from experience.

    Oh, and discouraging 'long drawn out jogs' as you put them, is also bad advice.
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    (Original post by addylad)
    It was a bad example; a 90s sprint with 1 min rest wouldn't even be done pre-competition. Nobody would run at maximal effort with such a recovery. If you suggest that workout to him in the middle of winter, and he goes and does it, he's got a great chance of getting injured. Just because you got it from a 'royal marine commando' Web site, it doesn't make it any better then anyone else's advice.

    Do you understand the reason behind running 30-40 seconds with 2-3 minutes rest? No, you're advising him to do it for the sake of it. If you're going to give advice about running at least understand a little of the physiology behind it first, and embark on a structured program so you can speak from experience.

    Oh, and discouraging 'long drawn out jogs' as you put them, is also bad advice.
    Oh I do apologise:rolleyes:

    Ok I said full pelt(sprint) i have now edited it. I meant to say run at a fast pace. And running at a fast pace for 90s and resting for a minute is not bad at all. I do this all the time. Also like i told you i said "vary your times depending on your fitness level". I never said it was better than anyone ele's advice, however most people agree the best exercise for getting fitter is some sort of interval training. Rather than what most people do, which is go out for a run for about an hour at a pace that that is barley faster than walking. And I was not discouraging jogs, I was discouraging effortless jogs.

    Op here is my workout.

    I tend to run in the mornings, partly because it's quite, partly because I like the cool air in the morning and apprently it's good for the metabolism (although this may be a myth).

    I start off running for 5 min around my block and then stretch.
    I then do burpees. 3 sets of ten and stretch.
    Push ups 3 sets of 15 and stretch upper body.
    Then I start on my interval training. I usually do this on a pre planned course around my estate, and this incorperates flat runs and up hill runs. However for a beginner i'd try and stay in a flat area to start off with. DO NOT hit the hills until
    you are used to running.
    I usually do 4 sets of 90s Fast pace runs and then rest. When coming to the end of my 90s i slow down to a walk. DO NOT just stop suddenly, as this will cause injury. Once I've done my 4 sets I will stop and let my heart rate go down and get my breathing under control. I will then repeat this until I finish the set course i have set out. It usually take 30-40 min. Not sure how many miles it is. But for a beginner I'd just do 20min to start off. And also don't run for 90s and rest for 60s, only run for maybe 20-30 seconds and rest for 120-180s but don't let your heart rate drop to resting rate until you have finished your 4 sets. Again I'm being vague on the times, but that's because I cannot tell you how long is good for you because I have no idea how fit you are. Only you can judge.
    Once I'm finished I'll do some plyometrics for about 20 min. And then finish off with a warm down and a stretch. I do this 3-4 times a week. And also do other exercise like free weights and swimming and long runs for about 5-8 miles (as many hills as i can get in) twice a week. When on long runs I try and aim for an average of 7 minutes a mile. But again for a bigginer don't aim for minute miles. Just try and finish the run and then when you are used to running start to time your runs and quicken your pace. Also go easy on the hills at first.
    Main thing is to push yourself. Obviously there is a fine line between pushing yourself and injuring yourself. But don't be scared to test your ability.

    Happy now addylad!
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    (Original post by addylad)
    Awful advice.

    Interval training is the best? No, a varied program which addresses all of the energy systems is best. Interval training is just one component of a fitness plan.
    You talk about addressing all of the energy systems however the program that you recommend will only develop his aerobic fitness and will have little or no effect on his anaerobic fitness. That is one of the benefits of HIIT, you can develop anaerobic and aerobic fitness simultaneously.

    If we're being realistic slow, long distance running is an attribute which is of little value to the general population unless you're a long distance runner. Most people would better benefit from a more even balance of anaerobic conditioning, aerobic conditioning, speed and strength.

    Going from nothing to 90 second sprints with an unrealistic rest is just asking for injuries.
    Nobody can maintain a 90s sprint, if we're being realistic we're looking at a fast run/jog.

    Once you have an aerobic base you can then start to worry about core strength, weights, plyometrics, speedwork, fartlek, anaerobic threshold running, etc. This period for 90% of runners is to increase the aerobic base so that when you start upping the mileage, your body doesn't break down.
    A lack of aerobic fitness does not cause injuries. If we exclude technique and shoe related injuries one of the main causes is overuse due to excessive volume and/or insufficient recovery. What do you think has the greatest volume, HIIT or LISS? Low intensity steady state runs.

    Sure HIIT isn't without injury risk however if you ease yourself into it by warming up properly, increasing rest interval, lowering work interval intensity, shortening the work interval, doing fewer repetitions, etc it is scalable even for beginners.
 
 
 
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