Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Clarification on misleading BBC article Watch

Announcements
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-11920628

    I recently read the article above considering the general consensus is that the new fees were being introduced 2012/2013.

    As MPs prepare for that vote - on whether to back government proposals to increase the cap in fees from £3,375 to £9,000 from 2013 - Lib Dem sources said it was still unclear which way their 57 MPs would go.
    The cap seems to be incorrect to. Was the person writing this article just misinformed? Or am I missing something here? It was written on the 5th of December, but I don't want to be naive in thinking they have changed the date.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Booyah1388)
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-11920628

    I recently read the article above considering the general consensus is that the new fees were being introduced 2012/2013.



    The cap seems to be incorrect to. Was the person writing this article just misinformed? Or am I missing something here? It was written on the 5th of December, but I don't want to be naive in thinking they have changed the date.
    The cap is technically correct as a few universities will be allowed to charge up to £9,000, but most will be stuck at £6,000.

    Though as a 2012 applicant, I really really really really really really hope that the 2013 date in this article is correct. D:
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Yes and not only that it could potentially help curb such a rush for places next year. Sadly, every where else I read it says that it's 2012/2013. I wish whoever wrote this column wasn't so ambiguous.

    Oh and by the way, I was referring to the current tuition fee cap quoted in the article of £3,375.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Silly Goose)
    The cap is technically correct as a few universities will be allowed to charge up to £9,000, but most will be stuck at £6,000.

    Though as a 2012 applicant, I really really really really really really hope that the 2013 date in this article is correct. D:
    Not true.

    Most will charge £9000 in order to stop an education standards gap appearing and keep reputation up.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-11483638

    So will universities get more money?

    Universities have been struggling to meet surging demand for places. Many years of rising investment under Labour have given way to cuts as the economic climate has changed.

    In general, the money raised from tuition fees will simply replace major cuts to teaching budgets, especially in arts and humanities subjects.

    The Browne review's conclusions were modelled on an 80% cut to teaching grants.

    Cuts of 40% to the higher education budget were announced in the spending review on 20 October 2010. But that budget includes student grants, which are unlikely to be significantly cut, as well as the teaching grant, suggesting that teaching funds are likely to face cuts much deeper than 40%.

    However, some universities may be able to charge fees high enough to enable them to increase their funding despite the budget cuts.

    The Higher Education Policy Institute has predicted that almost all universities will charge fees of £9,000 - not just a few.

    The knock-on effect of this, it says, will be that it costs the government more than it has predicted to subsidised the loans - which may result in further fee or interest rate rises.

    How are universities currently funded?

    In the UK as a whole, income from fees - including fees paid directly by students such as postgraduates and overseas students - makes up about 29% of universities' total funding, which was £25.4bn in 2008/09.

    Another 35% comes from government funding bodies, while the rest comes from other sources such as research grants, endowments and investments.

    As a very rough guide, universities say the average classroom undergraduate degree costs about £7,000 a year to teach, of which just over £3,000 currently comes from fees and the rest from government funding. Courses such as medicine and sciences cost more.

    If much of the teaching budget is withdrawn, vice-chancellors say they would need to raise fees to £7,000 to cover the shortfall.


    No university is going to ask for less than £7000 per course realistically when other universities are taking full advantage and asking for £9000.

    Don't believe any of what the LD's or Tories say about only certain uni's being allowed to charge £9000 because their is no strict rules in their proposals backing their claims.

    All an institution has to do is prove why they want to charge £9000 and reasons why which could be

    1. To increase education standards
    2. increase reputation in UK and internationally
    3. To increase funding for better facilities
    4. To increase funding for better equipment
    5. Increase funding for better links with outside organisations in certain subjects.

    Any reason could be put forward by a university to allow them to charge £9,000.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Will you be richer or poorer than your parents?
    Useful resources

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.