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    Hey guys

    Basically I have heard that a lot of the small revision books that give a very brief outline of each course (eg nutshells) are full of inaccuracies and are quite simply rubbish.
    I was wandering if anyone studying Law or has studied Law can reccomend any good ones that you have used for Criminal, Land, contract and Public Law. I am just looking for something that is very basic and just gives the basic concepts of the topic area and i know for example the nutshell series is known for being inaccurate (althought maybe I have heard wrong)

    Thanks
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    (Original post by jmat)
    Hey guys

    Basically I have heard that a lot of the small revision books that give a very brief outline of each course (eg nutshells) are full of inaccuracies and are quite simply rubbish.
    I was wandering if anyone studying Law or has studied Law can reccomend any good ones that you have used for Criminal, Land, contract and Public Law. I am just looking for something that is very basic and just gives the basic concepts of the topic area and i know for example the nutshell series is known for being inaccurate (althought maybe I have heard wrong)

    Thanks
    Hi

    Try law express, I find that they really help, hope this helps.
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    You aren't going to get better than nutshells for short books, sorry. Law Express, nutshells etc. are all a bit rubbish and IMO you don't save any time by using them. IMO you are better off getting a larger undergrad textbook that is written in an easily understandable style (e.g. Herring's Casebook for Criminal law) and using that

    For Contract get "Burrows - Casebook on Contract"
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    (Original post by jmat)
    Hey guys

    Basically I have heard that a lot of the small revision books that give a very brief outline of each course (eg nutshells) are full of inaccuracies and are quite simply rubbish.
    I was wandering if anyone studying Law or has studied Law can reccomend any good ones that you have used for Criminal, Land, contract and Public Law. I am just looking for something that is very basic and just gives the basic concepts of the topic area and i know for example the nutshell series is known for being inaccurate (althought maybe I have heard wrong)

    Thanks
    Gray and Gray's core text (not Elements) on land law is meant to be good, but it's still a fairly substantial text. I think it's only small in comparison with big Gray and Gray or Megarry & Wade.

    I second JP's recommendation on Burrows' casebook on contract. Mckendrick's book is also quite accessible and shorter than many.
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    (Original post by jacketpotato)
    You aren't going to get better than nutshells for short books, sorry. Law Express, nutshells etc. are all a bit rubbish and IMO you don't save any time by using them. IMO you are better off getting a larger undergrad textbook that is written in an easily understandable style (e.g. Herring's Casebook for Criminal law) and using that

    For Contract get "Burrows - Casebook on Contract"
    I already have my million case text books and seperate case books where needed. I was hoping there was something slightly shorter which is a good mind jogger or a good intro. The text books aren't hard but having something shorter than 50-100 pages per topic would be nice sometimes! But thanks. We were told Anson law of contract and have mckrendrick's casebook for contract.

    and for criminal we have prof w wilson who conviently has written his own books... and so we have his books for criminal (text and case). So basically you think it is worth me saving my money and not bothering?
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    (Original post by jjarvis)
    Gray and Gray's core text (not Elements) on land law is meant to be good, but it's still a fairly substantial text. I think it's only small in comparison with big Gray and Gray or Megarry & Wade.

    I second JP's recommendation on Burrows' casebook on contract. Mckendrick's book is also quite accessible and shorter than many.
    I have enough text/case books to last me a lifetime already, let alone having to get more for next year. I heard there was a shorter mckendrick book which was good so I may have a look at that, although contract is the easier IMO of the 4 subjects.
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    (Original post by jmat)
    having something shorter than 50-100 pages per topic would be nice sometimes!
    You could always write it yourself. The process of writing it would be good revision, no?
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    (Original post by TKC)
    You could always write it yourself. The process of writing it would be good revision, no?
    I know that but condensing that much takes time, especially as I haven't done it all the way along so trying to catch up will take a while so really it was the interim period that I could do with something that is bite-sized
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    (Original post by jmat)
    I have enough text/case books to last me a lifetime already, let alone having to get more for next year. I heard there was a shorter mckendrick book which was good so I may have a look at that, although contract is the easier IMO of the 4 subjects.
    I'm a big fan of Anson on Contract, but the McKendrick "Law Masters" book is a really good intro. It's not as in-depth as Anson, but in some ways it's more accessible. I think Burrows casebook is a great way of getting at the contract cases. I've not used the McKendrick TCM much, but my supervisor actually recommended Burrows over the McKendrick TCM. None of my friends uses big McKendrick, which doesn't mean it's a bad text, but Burrows is universally appreciated.
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    (Original post by jjarvis)
    I'm a big fan of Anson on Contract, but the McKendrick "Law Masters" book is a really good intro. It's not as in-depth as Anson, but in some ways it's more accessible. I think Burrows casebook is a great way of getting at the contract cases. I've not used the McKendrick TCM much, but my supervisor actually recommended Burrows over the McKendrick TCM. None of my friends uses big McKendrick, which doesn't mean it's a bad text, but Burrows is universally appreciated.
    What are the other books in that series like, do you know? Such as the criminal one. The lecturer we have is massive on theory and so he sometimes makes his theory sound like the law so it would probably help to have a textbook not by him as well, he reccomends smith and hogan but I didn't really want to spend 30-40 on another large text book when I already have 2 for criminal
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    (Original post by jmat)
    What are the other books in that series like, do you know? Such as the criminal one. The lecturer we have is massive on theory and so he sometimes makes his theory sound like the law so it would probably help to have a textbook not by him as well, he reccomends smith and hogan but I didn't really want to spend 30-40 on another large text book when I already have 2 for criminal
    I'm afraid I've not actually used the other books in that series much. I've not taken criminal (affiliated students do it in their second year), so I can't help you there I'm afraid. I'd poke about your library, try a bunch, and see what you like.

    Jenny Steele's TCM on tort is okay, but I haven't found an up-to-date tort casebook I really like. Tony Weir's is good, but it's pretty dated and getting more dated.
 
 
 
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