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Do you think politics should be made a compulsory subject in secondary education? Watch

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    I've thought this for quite a long time and interested to hear other peoples opinions on it.

    As a nation we seem to be very poorly educated on the actual workings of our own political system and the general beliefs of the political parties that fight to govern our country. It seems strange to me that the very basis in which our country operates is almost completely left out of compulsory education?
    Surely if we add say, a once a week politics class for all year 10 & 11 students, we as a nation will become much more politically abled resulting in people making real informed decisions when they vote.
    Obviously there will be obstacles to face, like creating a curriculum that isn't politically biased to certain parties and acquiring funding. But really, the benefits in my mind far out weigh the negatives.
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    Politics is very boring so no, its not a good idea to impose it on pupils.
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    (Original post by Maker)
    Politics is very boring (in my opinion) so no, its not a good idea to impose it on pupils.
    There you go.
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    yeah I do
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    I would agree, but I remember what our compulsory RE lessons were like. Basically just throwing sh** at each other and having a laugh.
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    one word, No.

    People often don't give two flying ****s about R.E. and mess around in the lessons, yet alone politics.

    OP is crazy :O
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    Not ideology, but basic politics and economics. People need to know how the system works. I asked my parents about this and they said it used to be an O level subject called Civics.

    When I went with my mum to vote in May, a woman looked at her ballot and exclaimed loudly "Why isn't David Cameron on here!?" and the person told her that she could only vote for local candidates... she didn't even know what party Cameron was in, but the guy said Conservatives so she voted for them... firstly I bet she couldn't tell me a single Conservative policy, and had probably never seen the Tory candidate for our constituency. In all honesty, it made me think "Why can she vote when I can't?" (I'm under eighteen).

    Since that happened, I've strongly advocated a basic, compulsory GCSE course making sure that people at least know what they're voting for. Otherwise, how is it even valid? You can't say that that woman's vote should have had equal weighting with an informed decision, can you?
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    (Original post by Cuckoo91)
    There you go.
    Smart arse
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    (Original post by milkytea)
    Not ideology, but basic politics and economics. People need to know how the system works. I asked my parents about this and they said it used to be an O level subject called Civics.

    When I went with my mum to vote in May, a woman looked at her ballot and exclaimed loudly "Why isn't David Cameron on here!?" and the person told her that she could only vote for local candidates... she didn't even know what party Cameron was in, but the guy said Conservatives so she voted for them... firstly I bet she couldn't tell me a single Conservative policy, and had probably never seen the Tory candidate for our constituency. In all honesty, it made me think "Why can she vote when I can't?" (I'm under eighteen).

    Since that happened, I've strongly advocated a basic, compulsory GCSE course making sure that people at least know what they're voting for. Otherwise, how is it even valid? You can't say that that woman's vote should have had equal weighting with an informed decision, can you?
    Its a stupid suggestion. People make all kinds of decisions in their life such as on health, food, education, marriage and children.

    Should they go on a course everytime they want to know if they should eat spuds or rice?
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    (Original post by Maker)
    Its a stupid suggestion. People make all kinds of decisions in their life such as on health, food, education, marriage and children.

    Should they go on a course everytime they want to know if they should eat spuds or rice?
    Why is it stupid? Why settle for sub-par when the facility is there to enhance democracy? People make their own choices, that's fine, but when it comes to a ballot then imho people should either understand what they're doing or stay at home. Obviously we should aim for a society in which everybody is able to make an informed decision. The thing is, if an MP is elected by people that fail to understand the system, this can create a negative impact on the entire constituency, even country, but if an individual makes a stupid decision regarding their own food/education/marriage, then it affects them alone. That's not desirable, but people can learn from their experiences.

    @Other posters: You say people don't give a **** about politics. Well they need to understand that they are directly affected by it on a daily basis. Because everybody is, in some form or other.
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    (Original post by milkytea)
    Not ideology, but basic politics and economics. People need to know how the system works. I asked my parents about this and they said it used to be an O level subject called Civics.

    When I went with my mum to vote in May, a woman looked at her ballot and exclaimed loudly "Why isn't David Cameron on here!?" and the person told her that she could only vote for local candidates... she didn't even know what party Cameron was in, but the guy said Conservatives so she voted for them... firstly I bet she couldn't tell me a single Conservative policy, and had probably never seen the Tory candidate for our constituency. In all honesty, it made me think "Why can she vote when I can't?" (I'm under eighteen).

    Since that happened, I've strongly advocated a basic, compulsory GCSE course making sure that people at least know what they're voting for. Otherwise, how is it even valid? You can't say that that woman's vote should have had equal weighting with an informed decision, can you?
    Precisely.. unless you go out of your way to try to learn from news papers, party websites or friends that are in the know etc, you're generally not really going to have a clue who's who and what's what. For something that is so integral in the way we operate our society, it makes no sense we don't at least teach the basics.

    In regards to the comparison to RE/RS classes - The fact some students found it boring is probably because of a teacher that failed to motivate student interest in the subject.
    RE/RS is necessary to educate students in accepting and understanding the beliefs of different cultures, and I support it.
    But really teaching politics is massively important for our nation to effectively utilise the democratic values which we have been fighting for, for so long.
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    I wouldn't have said so until we had General Studies lessons at A2. Peoples' ignorance of politics is incredible - it definitely should be incorporated somewhere in the curriculum.
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    Definitely. I think they need to get rid of R.E and incorporate it into a wider course which covers British and [the basics of] international politics, basic religious education and a basic education of the law system. Providing they don't call it citizenship (That instantly stops people taking it seriously), I think given 3-4 hours a week it would be taken seriously and brighten our kids alot.
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    (Original post by milkytea)
    Not ideology, but basic politics and economics. People need to know how the system works. I asked my parents about this and they said it used to be an O level subject called Civics.

    When I went with my mum to vote in May, a woman looked at her ballot and exclaimed loudly "Why isn't David Cameron on here!?" and the person told her that she could only vote for local candidates... she didn't even know what party Cameron was in, but the guy said Conservatives so she voted for them... firstly I bet she couldn't tell me a single Conservative policy, and had probably never seen the Tory candidate for our constituency. In all honesty, it made me think "Why can she vote when I can't?" (I'm under eighteen).

    Since that happened, I've strongly advocated a basic, compulsory GCSE course making sure that people at least know what they're voting for. Otherwise, how is it even valid? You can't say that that woman's vote should have had equal weighting with an informed decision, can you?
    :rofl:
    So many people are ignorant when it comes to politics I've had friends ask me who's the president :facepalm2:
    I agree with you though, I reckon the basics should be made compulsory.
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    (Original post by tieyourmotherdown)
    Definitely. I think they need to get rid of R.E and incorporate it into a wider course which covers British and [the basics of] international politics, basic religious education and a basic education of the law system. Providing they don't call it citizenship (That instantly stops people taking it seriously), I think given 3-4 hours a week it would be taken seriously and brighten our kids alot.
    *high fives*

    It seems so strange we don't do this already.
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    (Original post by Cuckoo91)
    I've thought this for quite a long time and interested to hear other peoples opinions on it.

    As a nation we seem to be very poorly educated on the actual workings of our own political system and the general beliefs of the political parties that fight to govern our country. It seems strange to me that the very basis in which our country operates is almost completely left out of compulsory education?
    Surely if we add say, a once a week politics class for all year 10 & 11 students, we as a nation will become much more politically abled resulting in people making real informed decisions when they vote.
    Obviously there will be obstacles to face, like creating a curriculum that isn't politically biased to certain parties and acquiring funding. But really, the benefits in my mind far out weigh the negatives.
    I totally agree with the OP. During the run-up to the elections and aftermath, so many people at my school were going on about it, even though most of them had got their information wrong. And just last week, I got asked by a dumbass who the Prime Minister of Scotland was. I mean seriously? And also, I am a ******** for knowing who Theresa May is? (I think you can tell my school sucks )
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    Out of three people I asked in my year, only one knew when WWII began and ended. If we're talking about general ignorance.
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    When you have a government dictating that all children must "learn" politics, you have a serious problem on your hands. It will not end well. Ruling class propaganda is live and kicking as it is, without its own designated lesson.

    I do not think that forced 'education' is good under any circumstances, but you could do worse than teaching the history of the English constitution in History lessons, but the government should have nothing to do with it.
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    I don't know if this is widespread, but in my school there wasn't much emphasis on politics in PSHE lessons at all. I be that many young people today don't realise that we're under a coalition government, and why in this case it's significant. Hence the protests.
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      Right, I am currently a secondary school student, and I can tell you for a fact - it will not work.

      (Original post by Cuckoo91)
      As a nation we seem to be very poorly educated on the actual workings of our own political system and the general beliefs of the political parties that fight to govern our country.
      Unfortunately this is due to apathy, ignorance and misinformation.

      It seems strange to me that the very basis in which our country operates is almost completely left out of compulsory education?
      What makes you think people would care/listen?

      Surely if we add say, a once a week politics class for all year 10 & 11 students, we as a nation will become much more politically abled resulting in people making real informed decisions when they vote.
      :rofl: It will not work. Can't see this happening. Realistically it would be used as a doss lesson to either chat, mess about or do other work.

      Obviously there will be obstacles to face, like creating a curriculum that isn't politically biased to certain parties and acquiring funding. But really, the benefits in my mind far out weigh the negatives.
      Good luck with that. It would just be compulsory, overt left-wing propaganda.
     
     
     
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