Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

How can I be more in-depth in my History exams? Watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I didn't do too well on my summer AS history papers (compared how high I was predicted - A/B and achieved a C in the non-source paper and an E in the source-based paper) and I got my papers back and there seems to be a consensus in why I didn't do that well - I was being too superficial and lacked depth. Basically I want to know how I can be more in-depth with my answers - it probably involves more knowledge but the thing is the knowledge was there in my answers, I mean I was saying the right things but I didn't deploy enough information. How do I do it?
    Thanks
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Be sepcific with your knowledge and make it tight and consice I.E. if you were doing Britian or soemthing could say something like General strike in May 1926 was a key turning point for miners, in which 3 million people went on strike for a period of 9 days. Its precise and too the point and shows knowledge
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    3 pieces of precise evidence to back up each point at the least
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Read example essays (ones that are graded of course!), if your textbook doesn't have any, ask your teacher. You'll start picking up little links and interpretations from them. Then start trying to use those techniques in your own essays - practice (including timed practice) is vital. Also try reading any history 6th form magazines your school may subscribe to and maybe do a bit of extra reading (not essential but damn helpful).

    Also, I like to view writing essay as kind of violent - you're ripping apart information, whether it's sources (use own knowledge and the other sources to rip it apart) or simply ripping apart the question (using own knowledge to rip apart the question into its little segments and seeing how far etc the question stands).
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    You want specific own knowledge (names, dates, places, numbers) and make sure your spellings are correct. Only use relevent information but try and show a broad range of knowledge - planning topics in advance helps with this. I'd also work on how to write introductions and conclusions as these are big things - mine were always weak so I really had to work on them all through A-level - I mean, the examiner does have a lot of these to mark. I'd also ask your teacher for practice questions on each topic and try these - this will give you ideas about answers (even if those questions aren't the ones in the exam) and so more time to spend on your essay writing. Timing is also important so as not to be sketchy at the end - it's better to miss out paragraphs to get a substantial conclusion in there, I found.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by notonmygapyah)
    I didn't do too well on my summer AS history papers (compared how high I was predicted - A/B and achieved a C in the non-source paper and an E in the source-based paper) and I got my papers back and there seems to be a consensus in why I didn't do that well - I was being too superficial and lacked depth. Basically I want to know how I can be more in-depth with my answers - it probably involves more knowledge but the thing is the knowledge was there in my answers, I mean I was saying the right things but I didn't deploy enough information. How do I do it?
    Thanks

    A general tip make sure you relate everything back to the question. Ask yourself why does it particular point matter to THIS specific question? Avoid waffle, you need to make every sentence count since you have limited time.

    For the source paper, use the sources as a reference point for investigation of the question. The source paper is a real test of how you can de construct a piece of text. Make sure you throw in a few terms such as this source: suggests, implies, states, argues etc

    The key to becoming good at exams is by doing past papers. Time yourself and plan essays and source questions and cross check this with the mark scheme or examiner's report.

    Good luck!
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Did TEF Bronze Award affect your UCAS choices?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.