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    hey i am new here so dont know how all this work
    i am stuck with contract law essay as i need to clarify some things on it before i can actually write it.

    can someone please tell me whether in offer and agreement, can invitation to treat be revoked if so, is there any case you can recommed for me.
    also can there be a counter offer in invitation to treat and i am not sure whether my essay question is a bilateral offer or an unilateral. its about someone who adverrtises to sell rare train model to anyone who offers him highest price around £8000. :confused::confused::confused:


    please help me i really need to know this and idont have much time left either

    thank you.x
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    Hey, don't know about the case study but; invitation to treat can be revoked as long as the contract hasn't been accepted. And yes there can be a counter off on an invitation to treat. Can't tell you which kind of offer it is tho (bilateral or unilateral).

    Hope that helps some.
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    (Original post by Fletcher-BCW)
    Hey, don't know about the case study but; invitation to treat can be revoked as long as the contract hasn't been accepted. And yes there can be a counter off on an invitation to treat. Can't tell you which kind of offer it is tho (bilateral or unilateral).

    Hope that helps some.
    thank you so much

    re, revocation: in my essay the customer withdrew the offer, does this count as revocation even though it didnt clearly state whether the person who wanted to sell the train (offeror) accepted it or not.:confused:
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    An invitation to treat is not an offer and therefore can't be 'revoked'. It is merely an advertisement, not a promise to sell. A price tag in a shop window is an invitation to treat. The shopkeeper is not obliged to sell.

    The offer is made by anyone coming along and offering a price, which may then be accepted or not. Until it is accepted it can be revoked. Once it is accepted, it cannot.

    A bilateral offer is made to a single party. A unilateral offer is made to the world. The difference between a unilateral offer and an invitation to treat is that the former is definitive enough to be capable of acceptance - e.g. "I will sell to the first person to pay me £8,000 on Monday", but not "If you contact me and the item is still available I may sell it to you if you give me a good price."

    Depending on the wording of the question you may also need to consider offers by tender.

    I should say that the point of legal essays is more arguing both sides and establishing which is the more likely answer rather than focusing on the 'correct' answer, which is what you appear to be doing!
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    (Original post by ap3456)
    A bilateral offer is made to a single party. A unilateral offer is made to the world. The difference between a unilateral offer and an invitation to treat is that the former is definitive enough to be capable of acceptance - e.g. "I will sell to the first person to pay me £8,000 on Monday", but not "If you contact me and the item is still available I may sell it to you if you give me a good price."

    Depending on the wording of the question you may also need to consider offers by tender.

    I should say that the point of legal essays is more arguing both sides and establishing which is the more likely answer rather than focusing on the 'correct' answer, which is what you appear to be doing!
    A unilateral offer could be made to a single person--If A were to say to B "I will pay you £500 if you run the London marathon", that would be a unilateral offer. B is under no obligation to run the London marathon, but if she did then A would have to pay. If A says "I promise to pay you £500 if you promise to run the London marathon", that would be a bilateral contract giving rise to obligations for both parties. The crucial point is whether obligations exist on both sides, or on one side only. A offer for a bilateral contract could be made to multiple people, "if each or all of you promise to do x, I will do y" would be an offer for a bilateral contract.
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    ITT is a legal nullity so whether you can revoke it or not is irrelevant

    An offer in response to a ITT wouldn't be a counter-offer it would just be offer (though the effect if the same)
 
 
 
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