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    i have been trying to do this question for the past 4 hours and i am still struggling to work it out.
    Could someone help me please

    3) Name what type of reaction and give a general mechanism you would expect to occur between the two compounds and name the final product.
    a) CH3CH=CH2 + HCl
    b) CH3CH2Cl + NaOH
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    a) electrophilic addition... 2 chloropropane

    b) nucleophillic substitution or elimination depending on the solution..... can't be pestered doing it in my head though
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    felt bad :P

    if its nucleophilic substitution (aqueous solution) = ethanol

    if its elimination (ethanol solvent) = ethene

    ask if you want to know why for each :P
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    thanks and yes please do explain why if you do not mind as otherwise i will not be able to do any in the future
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    The first one is electrophilic addition because the double bond is an electron rich area which the slightly positive Hydrogen on the HCl (Cl is more electronegative than H) will be attracted to. It will recieve electrons and add on, forming a positive cation. The electrons in the HCl bond will have gone to the Cl making it Cl-. This positive cation will now react with the Cl- to make the final products mentioned above.
    I think, I'm a bit rusty, must look over it again.

    For the second one, the C-Cl bond is polar, so the carbon will be slightly positive and the chlorine will be slightly negative (same as HCl above). This slightly positive carbon can now be "attacked" by nucleophiles with a lone pair of electrons, such as the :OH- that forms when NaOH dissociates. The :OH- will donate two of it's electrons to the "electron deficient" carbon and the chlorine will take the electrons from the bond to become Cl- while the OH stays on the carbon, making your final product ethanol.

    Again, I think
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    the first one is electrophilic addition because your adding a positively charged H+ ion across a negatively rich carbon carbon double bond. Due to Mendelev's rule (or however you spell it) the hydrogen attaches to the carbon with the most hydrogens already on it. The negatively chloride ion will then bond with the positive carbocation remaining.

    second one:

    could be nucleophilic substitution if the solution is in aqueous conditions because the OH- ion is attracted to the electron deficient carbon that is bonded to the chlorine. (The C is slightly positive because the Cl is highly electronegative) because the OH- is more electronegative than the chlorine it displaces it. Hence the reaction is a type of substitution.

    could be elimination if the solution is in ethanoic conditions as the OH attacks a hydrogen on the CH3 carbon, the electrons then move from this H to the CC bond and from this to the C Br bond. This allows the Br to break away and form a carbon carbon double bond in the process.

    I'm assuming you're doing AS chemistry?
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    whoops, sorry, didn't realise there was someone else already answering it!
 
 
 
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