Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

How much will universities realistically charge? Watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I know the cap is going up to £6000 for basic degrees now, but what do people expect the charges to actually be. Will the majority begin to charge £6000, or will it be lower?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Nothing will change it is just removing the potential tax from the current workforce and burdening the future workforce i have to say the current leaders are the worst generation ever they are complete dicks towards us leaving us with climate change, huge debts and a terrible football team.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jacktri)
    Nothing will change it is just removing the potential tax from the current workforce and burdening the future workforce i have to say the current leaders are the worst generation ever they are complete dicks towards us leaving us with climate change, huge debts and a terrible football team.
    Completely. Start with Nick Clegg going back to school and learning the definition of signing a pledge. :rolleyes:

    Just curious, how many potential university students are now considering studying abroad?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by yummychocolate)
    Completely. Start with Nick Clegg going back to school and learning the definition of signing a pledge. :rolleyes:

    Just curious, how many potential university students are now considering studying abroad?
    Fess in America and Canada are still more expensive for home students.
    Not sure about Australia.


    Edit: Or you could study at the prestigious University of Twente in Holland.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Well these fee changes have opened up a whole new concept in higher education. Now the perceived quality of a degree/university will be associated with its cost, simply 'the more you pay, the better education you get'

    This will mean the vast majority of universities will want to put their fees up as high as possible so as not to be seen as offering an inferior product. Some universities will keep their fees low so as to be competitive but by doing so they will attract a lower reputation therefore the less you pay for your degree, the less it's worth to an employer.

    The notion that the £9k universities will have to prove they give opportunities to students from disadvantaged backgrounds is merely a publicity stunt. So what if the poorest 25% of students get the opportunity to go to a top uni along with the top 25%? It's the middle 50% that get screwed over.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Krebs)
    Fess in America and Canada are still more expensive for home students.
    Not sure about Australia.


    Edit: Or you could study at the prestigious University of Twente in Holland.
    I was thinking more of European Univerisities but I guess US is another option. Might need scholarships but it's a real possibility if you get scholarships.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by yummychocolate)
    I was thinking more of European Univerisities but I guess US is another option. Might need scholarships but it's a real possibility if you get scholarships.
    Forgot about Europe. But then again, won't there be a language barrier?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Krebs)
    Forgot about Europe. But then again, won't there be a language barrier?
    Lots of lectures are in English in European unis anyway. And I expect if they get a great influx of disgruntled British students seeking (free) education they'll be happy to accommodate...
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by garethDT)
    Well these fee changes have opened up a whole new concept in higher education. Now the perceived quality of a degree/university will be associated with its cost, simply 'the more you pay, the better education you get'

    This will mean the vast majority of universities will want to put their fees up as high as possible so as not to be seen as offering an inferior product. Some universities will keep their fees low so as to be competitive but by doing so they will attract a lower reputation therefore the less you pay for your degree, the less it's worth to an employer.

    The notion that the £9k universities will have to prove they give opportunities to students from disadvantaged backgrounds is merely a publicity stunt. So what if the poorest 25% of students get the opportunity to go to a top uni along with the top 25%? It's the middle 50% that get screwed over .
    What?! EVERYBODY GETS THE SAME LOAN, SAME REPAYMENT TERMS.

    Repayments are based on what YOU do after you graduate - not what your parents do.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by chinaberry)
    Lots of lectures are in England in European unis anyway. And I expect if they get a great influx of disgruntled British students seeking (free) education they'll be happy to accommodate...
    I'm pretty sure they aren't. Quite a few will teach the first year in English but then they expect you to become fluent in their language by the second year and move over onto the normal course.

    Maybe a few low-ranked unis will do that (like that Dutch one advertising on here) but I don't think it's really a viable option.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by garethDT)
    Well these fee changes have opened up a whole new concept in higher education. Now the perceived quality of a degree/university will be associated with its cost, simply 'the more you pay, the better education you get'

    This will mean the vast majority of universities will want to put their fees up as high as possible so as not to be seen as offering an inferior product. Some universities will keep their fees low so as to be competitive but by doing so they will attract a lower reputation therefore the less you pay for your degree, the less it's worth to an employer.

    The notion that the £9k universities will have to prove they give opportunities to students from disadvantaged backgrounds is merely a publicity stunt. So what if the poorest 25% of students get the opportunity to go to a top uni along with the top 25%? It's the middle 50% that get screwed over.
    Why do we always get screwed over!!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by angelmxxx)
    What?! EVERYBODY GETS THE SAME LOAN, SAME REPAYMENT TERMS.

    Repayments are based on what YOU do after you graduate - not what your parents do.
    Aren't students that were elligible for free school meals getting their first year free?
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Silly Goose)
    Aren't students that were elligible for free school meals getting their first year free?
    Yup. Yet another favouring of the working class.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Silly Goose)
    Aren't students that were elligible for free school meals getting their first year free?
    Well since the £150m wouldn't cover that, and everyone is angry that working parents won't be eligible for that (except in rare circumstances), I'm not sure that proposal's going anywhere in its current form.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Id say that quite a few will probably be charging around £7000. According to the Metro, this figure is needed just for universities to break even
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Myles1906)
    I know the cap is going up to £6000 for basic degrees now, but what do people expect the charges to actually be. Will the majority begin to charge £6000, or will it be lower?
    I reckon Oxbridge and Imperial will charge £9,000, LSE will give up on the system and go private, and Durham, Russell Group and Top 20 will be somewhere around £7,000, give or take a thousand. That's my prediction.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Silly Goose)
    Aren't students that were elligible for free school meals getting their first year free?
    I heard it was the first 2 years. :confused:
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Will you be richer or poorer than your parents?
    Useful resources

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.