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    Hi all I'm currently on a gap year, and am just wondering about the suitability of different types of degree in trying to get into Investment Banking. Essentially what I'm asking is whether its better to have a joint honours course in Economics and another subject i.e. Economics and Philosophy from a "higher" university; or whether a straight economics degree is more preferable from a "lesser" university. My current dilemma is Economics and Philosophy at UCL vs. Economics at Trinity College Dublin.

    Thanks for any input and information on this.

    PS: I wasn't sure whether this was suitable for the"The "Is this university/course good enough for banking/consultancy?" thread" thread. Please move if applicable.
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    The furthest you'll get with a degree from UCL is trading equities in Dallas.
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    (Original post by Zweihander)
    The furthest you'll get with a degree from UCL is trading equities in Dallas.
    If it's not too much hassle can I have a serious response please?
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    (Original post by Ideal.)
    Hi all I'm currently on a gap year, and am just wondering about the suitability of different types of degree in trying to get into Investment Banking. Essentially what I'm asking is whether its better to have a joint honours course in Economics and another subject i.e. Economics and Philosophy from a "higher" university; or whether a straight economics degree is more preferable from a "lesser" university. My current dilemma is Economics and Philosophy at UCL vs. Economics at Trinity College Dublin.

    Thanks for any input and information on this.

    PS: I wasn't sure whether this was suitable for the"The "Is this university/course good enough for banking/consultancy?" thread" thread. Please move if applicable.
    out of topic *sorry* but, OP, did you focus your personal statement purely on economics ? or did you put a bit on philosophy?

    if you put a bit about philosophy, how much in relation to the whole personal statement?
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    Half and half.
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    (Original post by Ideal.)
    Hi all I'm currently on a gap year, and am just wondering about the suitability of different types of degree in trying to get into Investment Banking. Essentially what I'm asking is whether its better to have a joint honours course in Economics and another subject i.e. Economics and Philosophy from a "higher" university; or whether a straight economics degree is more preferable from a "lesser" university. My current dilemma is Economics and Philosophy at UCL vs. Economics at Trinity College Dublin.

    Thanks for any input and information on this.

    PS: I wasn't sure whether this was suitable for the"The "Is this university/course good enough for banking/consultancy?" thread" thread. Please move if applicable.
    UCL has the edge because you're in London. Nobody really cares what degree you study, unless you want to Trade/Structure in which case Maths/Engineering is preferred. Trinity isn't bad at all, I know plenty of people who went on to work in the City from there, but many needed a Masters to do it. UCL is a safe enough bet.
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    The way I see it:

    1. From my experience, joint degrees (most of the time) tend to be easier than a normal one, implying that you have a better chance of getting a 1st.

    2. The first step in getting into investment banking is getting an interview, and HR normally don't recognise point 1. They are very likely to think that people studying Economics & Philosophy are "more rounded" than someone studying Economics.

    3. Another important point is that HR screening processes normally consider the University you go to, and your degree class, to be much more important than what you actually do - i.e. Take two students who attend Imperial - one gets a 2.2 in Physics (arguably one of their hardest courses), and one gets a 2.1 in Materials (one of the easier courses). The gap in level between these courses is huge, yet only one of them will have a chance in IB (2.1 guy).

    In conclusion, I would definitely recommend applying to some of these joint courses, as long as you research the modules which you will be taking, and making sure you're not doing something ridiculous like 2/3 of each of the single courses (meaning you're working 50% more than the single course people). The most important factors are going to a good uni, and getting a good result.
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    Trinity College has several joint degrees that you can combine Economics with... Maths, Philosophy, Psycholoy, Geography, Spanish, Russian etc. They also have Philosophy/ Politics/Economics and Sociology another choice would be Business, Economis and Social Studies (BESS). Of all the universities in Ireland it would be the best one when it would come to being recognised internationally.

    Having said this I having just been rejected post interview from Oxford I feel that a degree from one of the better known universities in the UK would serve you better when it would come to getting a job. I hope to apply again to Oxford next year. I have not yet decided if I will take a gap year or start a course in Trinity and apply to Oxford from there. Hope this is helpfull.
 
 
 
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