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Scottish accelerated LLB degrees - and conversion to English law Watch

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    Could anybody give me some advice on how would one go about converting to English law after studying Scots law? With this new tuition fees fiasco on the hand, I don't think I'd be able to afford to study law in England (I'm not from England, just EU). As far as cities are concerned, I'd much rather spend a few years in Edinburgh than Nottingham for example. However, I would ideally eventually like to qualify as a lawyer in both Scotland and England (still not sure if I'd like to practice law at this point, but I really want to study it). From the research I've done so far, it seems that it's easier to convert from Scots to English, than the other way around? Any advice? Do you know how much Scottish unis differ from English ones tuition fees wise? thanks a lot!
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    You can do the GDL course.
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    (Original post by Installation)
    You can do the GDL course.
    would I need to do that in England after (hypothetically) graduating from the Scots LLB course?

    Is there a way to get qualified for both types of laws simultaneously/while doing the 2 yr Scots LLB?
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      I don't know how much scottish fees cost but if you want to practice in England and you haven't done a qualifying law degree, you would need to do the GDL and the LPC.

      It's probably a good idea to bear in mind the cost of both. I think the GDL and LPC cost an average of £10,000 each although the figures might be much lower depending on where you do the courses.
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      (Original post by ninsy)
      would I need to do that in England after (hypothetically) graduating from the Scots LLB course?

      Is there a way to get qualified for both types of laws simultaneously/while doing the 2 yr Scots LLB?
      To answer your second question, not to my knowledge, no.

      You would need to do at least some of the GDL after a Scots LLB. To go through the compulsory subjects of a qualifying law degree in England/the GDL: Scots property law is dramatically different from English property law, as is Scots criminal law from English criminal law. Equity doesn't exist in Scots law, so you'd certainly need to study that as part of the GDL. I don't know how different the public law course on a Scots LLB course is from the compulsory public law course on the GDL, nor how different the coverage of EU law is. Contract is similar in some respects, but IIRC Scots law doesn't have the notion of consideration. Tort and delict are similar, but again, I'm far from certain they're identical.

      If you are interested in the academic side of law, I'd recommend a law degree over the GDL. You get a more in-depth academic focus on the law than a year-long course would permit. It's worth noting that two-year degrees exist in England--I'm studying on one at the moment, and Oxford, Sheffield, Birmingham, Bristol, Nottingham, and QMUL all offer two year qualifying law degrees. The ones at Bristol and Sheffield are MAs in law. You can apply for Scots law and English law courses through UCAS at the same time (I did--I applied to Edinburgh, Nottingham, Oxford, Cambridge, and QMUL).

      There are, however, issues surrounding cost. Have you seen the fees for 2nd degree LLB students? They're actually quite steep. Your tuition fees aren't subsidised for a second degree. I think you need to decide where you want to practise--doing a 2 year LLB and then the GDL would be very expensive. Unless you can get a TC with a firm who will pay for it, the process would put a huge strain on your budget.
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      (Original post by jjarvis)
      To answer your second question, not to my knowledge, no.

      You would need to do at least some of the GDL after a Scots LLB. To go through the compulsory subjects of a qualifying law degree in England/the GDL: Scots property law is dramatically different from English property law, as is Scots criminal law from English criminal law. Equity doesn't exist in Scots law, so you'd certainly need to study that as part of the GDL. I don't know how different the public law course on a Scots LLB course is from the compulsory public law course on the GDL, nor how different the coverage of EU law is. Contract is similar in some respects, but IIRC Scots law doesn't have the notion of consideration. Tort and delict are similar, but again, I'm far from certain they're identical.

      If you are interested in the academic side of law, I'd recommend a law degree over the GDL. You get a more in-depth academic focus on the law than a year-long course would permit. It's worth noting that two-year degrees exist in England--I'm studying on one at the moment, and Oxford, Sheffield, Birmingham, Bristol, Nottingham, and QMUL all offer two year qualifying law degrees. The ones at Bristol and Sheffield are MAs in law. You can apply for Scots law and English law courses through UCAS at the same time (I did--I applied to Edinburgh, Nottingham, Oxford, Cambridge, and QMUL).

      There are, however, issues surrounding cost. Have you seen the fees for 2nd degree LLB students? They're actually quite steep. Your tuition fees aren't subsidised for a second degree. I think you need to decide where you want to practise--doing a 2 year LLB and then the GDL would be very expensive. Unless you can get a TC with a firm who will pay for it, the process would put a huge strain on your budget.

      I am also interested in doing the accelerated LLB.

      Would you still need to do the GDL after completing a 2 yr LLB from Edinburgh? And what is the difference from the MA in Law and the senior status LLB?

      Also if you apply to day Bristol for the MA (direct) can you also apply through UCAS for Bristol to study the 3 yr LLB?
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      sorry but isnt the grad entry in edinburgh 8.300 while most in england are 4.700
     
     
     
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