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    I didn't go to what you could call the best of schools; far from it, in fact. My first primary school identified me as gifted and talented ... but didn't have a G&T programme, so no one ever did anything to help me.

    In fact, that school and the one that I later moved to were very active in discouraging me from asking stupid questions and reading ahead in the books because I can, in fact, read quite quickly. In one memorable incident, I was sent out of the room for lying that I had finished reading a book ... when I had done it all.

    So, by a time I get to a school that actually gives a **** about people, I've been taught that thinking differently is bad and that any effort you make won't be appreciated ... so I just don't. I'm still clever and still got good grades, but could probably have done a lot better.

    I've been reasonably successful - got into the uni I wanted on the course I wanted, and I'm doing all right here. I don't have very high ambitions, and I may well have not anyway, happier to pursue my own pastimes like fishing than spend all my time in a job ... but sometimes, I consider what could have been, and every time it comes back to "You are just an evil lying cow - get out of my classroom, I won't have you in my class anymore!"

    I'm not unhappy with the way I am, but I can't stop holding a grudge against the people that never tried to help me throughout my early education. It's not controlling my life or anything, but sometimes I just feel like I have a lot to say and no one to say it to.

    Any advice?
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    Man the **** up.
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    Ultimately your education is your own responsibility. Family and teachers can only get you so far. I worked hard on school subjects to get into a good uni and to go with the flow and not disappoint my parents, but I make time for my own intellectual pursuits even if they don't help my chances of survival in the real world. The key to happiness is to be curious about everything that surrounds you. When someone's disrespectful, I juts try and figure out why they would act that way. Crap marriage? Insecure about looks? Aggressiveness due to a warped sense of entitlement? That teacher was being a ***** when she called you a lying cow, but perhaps she was frustrated by her own weaknesses. If you look at people that way, you stop taking things personally. It's not events in our lives that affect us, but what we think of them. An insult doesn't actually hurt you, it's all in your head. Be compassionate to people without bowing down to them. Develop your mind on your own but don't be a smartass. On the other hand, everyone is affected by the human condition, so don't try and seek the approval of others unless there is material gain involved. Don't put others on a pedestal, but don't spit on them either, they face the same problems as you do deep down.

    Basically, you have to make your own goals and judge your achievement in life from the way you respected your own set of rules. Your self respect and happiness will emerge on its own if you do that. There is no use regretting things you can't change, or assigning blame to your problems onto others or your past. The "What if" game only leads to despair.

    If that doesn't work, if you still have a grudge, just watch Dexter or work out, I don't know. If you're healthy in body and mind nothing can depress you. Cheers
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    That was in primary school? If so I can understand.

    But anyway. You should gain some perspective: probably most kids would have been lying if they had said what you said. Therefore, the teacher was just acting based on the probability of your statement being true given the average ability of a child your age. The reaction was therefore most probably nothing personal. You cannot expect an average person who has to deal with mostly average children to understand and cater for a child who operates too far off of the norm.

    Just forget about it and enjoy your life. Actually in my personal opinion, too much success especially when you are young brings its own pressures and is probably not worth it in the end. (As you grow up, people care less and less - "child prodigy" phenomenon.) Fishing sounds much more enjoyable.
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    (Original post by Glowy Amoeba)
    you stop taking things personally. It's not events in our lives that affect us, but what we think of them. An insult doesn't actually hurt you, it's all in your head.
    Also, this. Most people that for some reason cause you problems are not malicious, just ignorant or selfish; they would be ignorant or selfish to the same degree if you didn't exist; it is nothing personal.
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    Your grudge will disappear as you get older. I doubt many people hold a grudge for their whole lives.

    Basically you just have to accept the way things have turned out. You can't change the past so be happy with who you are.
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    You are not helping yourself or anyone else so just move on... life is way too short to dwell on these things.
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    I wouldn't worry too much about it. I think in certain cases there is such a thing as being too clever for your own good.
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    (Original post by llys)
    That was in primary school? If so I can understand.

    But anyway. You should gain some perspective: probably most kids would have been lying if they had said what you said. Therefore, the teacher was just acting based on the probability of your statement being true given the average ability of a child your age. The reaction was therefore most probably nothing personal. You cannot expect an average person who has to deal with mostly average children to understand and cater for a child who operates too far off of the norm.

    Just forget about it and enjoy your life. Actually in my personal opinion, too much success especially when you are young brings its own pressures and is probably not worth it in the end. (As you grow up, people care less and less - "child prodigy" phenomenon.) Fishing sounds much more enjoyable.
    No teacher should call a six year old an evil lying cow, whether they are lying or not. Plus, this is the same teacher that would go on to ignore me when I said my ear hurt and I lost hearing in it because the infection set it.

    But I get what you're saying. I am happy and my childhood was easy to get through ... but it's still hard to not speculate at times.
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    Life is what you make it, some of the richest people I know didn't even have a good education. By clinging on to hateful memories then it will only drag you down in the future.
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    (Original post by M1F2R3)
    Life is what you make it, some of the richest people I know didn't even have a good education. By clinging on to hateful memories then it will only drag you down in the future.
    Rich doesn't bother me, and I am happy with what I'm doing; just might have been nice to develop how I was meant to, if that makes sense?
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I just feel like I have a lot to say and no one to say it to.
    i know what u mean
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    My primary school told me i had no musical talent and shouldn't go near an instrument. I self-taught myself an instrument when i was 13, learnt another instrument, did the GCSE and was recommended to take to AS. If my primary school hadn't told me that, maybe i'd have been even better. But the fact is, they did tell me that and what happened, happened, and my life isn't awful because i didn't learn to play the flute when i was seven. It's not really worth it to dwell on it. If you're happy as you are then what's the issue? If you constantly speculate, you'll just make yourself unhappy. If you have unfulfilled potential, you can go out and develop it now.

    I'd just let it go.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I didn't go to what you could call the best of schools; far from it, in fact. My first primary school identified me as gifted and talented ... but didn't have a G&T programme, so no one ever did anything to help me.

    In fact, that school and the one that I later moved to were very active in discouraging me from asking stupid questions and reading ahead in the books because I can, in fact, read quite quickly. In one memorable incident, I was sent out of the room for lying that I had finished reading a book ... when I had done it all.

    So, by a time I get to a school that actually gives a **** about people, I've been taught that thinking differently is bad and that any effort you make won't be appreciated ... so I just don't. I'm still clever and still got good grades, but could probably have done a lot better.

    I've been reasonably successful - got into the uni I wanted on the course I wanted, and I'm doing all right here. I don't have very high ambitions, and I may well have not anyway, happier to pursue my own pastimes like fishing than spend all my time in a job ... but sometimes, I consider what could have been, and every time it comes back to "You are just an evil lying cow - get out of my classroom, I won't have you in my class anymore!"

    I'm not unhappy with the way I am, but I can't stop holding a grudge against the people that never tried to help me throughout my early education. It's not controlling my life or anything, but sometimes I just feel like I have a lot to say and no one to say it to.

    Any advice?
    you must be a girl.... best piece of advice i can give..... stop moaning!!
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    Just get over it.
 
 
 
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