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Do you agree with the Coalition Tuition Fees policy? Watch

  • View Poll Results: Do you agree with the Coalition Tuition Fees policy?
    Yes
    63
    50.81%
    No
    61
    49.19%

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    I've seen more negs on people attacking it than those supporting it recently.
    I just though that it might be interesting if we had a proper poll on student opinion, now that the vote has gone through and the points have been endlessly debated.

    I fully expect this vote to be a 'no', but I'm still convinced it's a good plan.

    University is a qualified privilege - and the only qualification should be intelligence. But students will still pay nothing upfront for their degrees! The poorest 20% of students will not only pay less than the current system for their degrees, they will get a year to two years absolutely free! And with the 21000 pounds before repayment, only those who are successful from university will pay back more. If intelligence and suitability is the qualification for entry, then success is the qualification for payment. Perhaps the best way to describe it would be 'no win, no fee'. If you do not 'win' a good career from your degree, you need to pay little or nothing back towards it.

    Also, I don't think the government can help that most students just aren't listening to the proposals. They see the rise in the loan and just focus entirely on that, even when told the benefits of the proposal to them. It's like asking people 'do you want your taxes raised?'. The answer you will get is 'no'. It is likely that even if you make the point that higher taxes improve public services, they could improve your quality of life and help society in general, you will likely just get disagreement from these people. It's why John Major's government's 'Labour's tax bombshell' campaign was very, very successful in '92. It is very similar to the current NUS campaign. 'YOU WILL HAVE HIGHER DEBT', 'TRIPLE THE COST OF UNIVERSITY' are horrible phrases, but in this context that is not the be all and end all.

    But yes. More debate is part and parcel of this thread, but the vote will indeed be interesting.
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    I apologise if people feel this issue has been over-debated, as the PM I received. I still feel strongly about it.
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    I don't support it, even though I won't be affected by it if I get in next year.
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    Considering university budgets have been cut so drastically, then yes. There is no other way I'm afraid.
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    I'm neutral on the issue, don't really have an opinion either way.
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    Can a Moderator move this to University Fee's Discussion? That would be amazing. Thank you.

    Edit: Oop, already done.
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    (Original post by No Man)
    I don't support it, even though I won't be affected by it if I get in next year.
    Can you explain why? It interests me.
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    (Original post by meenu89)
    I'm neutral on the issue, don't really have an opinion either way.
    Poll reflects that pretty well.

    10-10 as it stands now. Even split!
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    (Original post by DJkG.1)
    Poll reflects that pretty well.

    10-10 as it stands now. Even split!
    How did you vote, and why?
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    (Original post by AskMeAnything)
    I've seen more negs on people attacking it than those supporting it recently.
    I just though that it might be interesting if we had a proper poll on student opinion, now that the vote has gone through and the points have been endlessly debated.

    I fully expect this vote to be a 'no', but I'm still convinced it's a good plan.

    University is a qualified privilege - and the only qualification should be intelligence. But students will still pay nothing upfront for their degrees! The poorest 20% of students will not only pay less than the current system for their degrees, they will get a year to two years absolutely free! And with the 21000 pounds before repayment, only those who are successful from university will pay back more. If intelligence and suitability is the qualification for entry, then success is the qualification for payment. Perhaps the best way to describe it would be 'no win, no fee'. If you do not 'win' a good career from your degree, you need to pay little or nothing back towards it.

    Also, I don't think the government can help that most students just aren't listening to the proposals. They see the rise in the loan and just focus entirely on that, even when told the benefits of the proposal to them. It's like asking people 'do you want your taxes raised?'. The answer you will get is 'no'. It is likely that even if you make the point that higher taxes improve public services, they could improve your quality of life and help society in general, you will likely just get disagreement from these people. It's why John Major's government's 'Labour's tax bombshell' campaign was very, very successful in '92. It is very similar to the current NUS campaign. 'YOU WILL HAVE HIGHER DEBT', 'TRIPLE THE COST OF UNIVERSITY' are horrible phrases, but in this context that is not the be all and end all.

    But yes. More debate is part and parcel of this thread, but the vote will indeed be interesting.
    Education is a right, mate, not a privilege.

    So obviously no, those fee plans are garbage.
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    (Original post by BADBOY89)
    Education is a right, mate, not a privilege.
    Derived from where?

    And why must you go to university to get an education anyway? Education is, for all intents and purposes, free. If you think £9000 a year for an education is expensive then you're going to the wrong library.

    What is not free is a piece of paper designed to 'get you ahead' in the job market, but that has nothing to do with education.
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    Absolutely not. Not only is it going to severely effect social mobility, but its going to mean our universities have less funding so quality will fall.

    It's not even going to help the deficit in the short run, its nothing more than conservative ideology.
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    Having looked at the proposals I actually think the new proposal is fairer than the previous system. £21,000 seems like a very reasonable starting point to pay back your student debt, and I don't think anyone can dispute that is certainly more favourable than £15,000.

    For all intents and purposes, the actual amount of debt seems completely arbitrary, after all, anything remaining is written off after 30 years regardless of what you earn.

    Not to mention the rise in the maintenance loan makes the living costs of university far more accessible to the working class and the middle classes.
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    (Original post by EdwardCurrent)
    Derived from where?

    And why must you go to university to get an education anyway? Education is, for all intents and purposes, free. If you think £9000 a year for an education is expensive then you're going to the wrong library.

    What is not free is a piece of paper designed to 'get you ahead' in the job market, but that has nothing to do with education.
    Well if u come out of a celebrity family or of an upper-middle class family with high incomes, it is good for you.

    What about the poorer families? They won't be able to send their children to uni, just because some bunch of dirty coalitioners decided to spend less on education than before which therefore leads to cuts in this sector.

    I am on a tight budget and with this stagnation, I can hardly find a job in the UK as I am a foreign student. And I wana go for an MA after finishing my BA. And I need a job and need one quickly.
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    Join the March of Resistance in London on the 20th of December! See my signature below.
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    I think lots of people oppose it because they see the £9 grand figure and get scared, but in reality loans are increasing, you pay no interest or anything back until you earn 21k and because its linked to earnings you'll always be able to afford it. It's still good value for money.

    I think it's fair and quite a good deal but personally I think they should have cut welfare more to protect the HE budget.
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    (Original post by DaveSmith99)
    Absolutely not. Not only is it going to severely effect social mobility, but its going to mean our universities have less funding so quality will fall.

    It's not even going to help the deficit in the short run, its nothing more than conservative ideology.
    I would dispute about both social mobility and university funding, and I'm not even a conservative.

    These reforms are in reality an improvement for poorer students, although it may seem counter-intuitive, the only thing to deter people is the lump sum of debt, which is in itself meaningless as it little to do with how its paid back. Repayments will only ever be affordable, so nobody will be 'crippled' by debt. The focus should be on educating people about the way this system really works. Higher maintenance loans/grants are very good for poorer students.

    Also, universities charging close to £9k will receive more money than at present. Sure the teaching budget is being cut 80%, but it will be more than replaced by increased fees at that level. Very few universities will be significantly worse off, and the majority will be better off.

    Personally, I would support the Government biting the bullet and fully funding higher education, except for maybe ~£1k fees, as in Europe. It would actually involve less govt expenditure than this new system probably will, although less would be clawed back directly.

    But to my view, the new proposals are far better than the old system.
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    Why don't the government take this to its logical conclusion and charge pupils to sit A-levels? After all, it's not compulsory, and why should a postman subsidise the education of someone studying further maths who'll go on to work in the City?! A person with A-levels will earn over a quarter more compared to someone without, and nowadays there are simply too many idiots studying stupid subjects for us to afford!!!!!!, etc, etc.
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    Disagree with the vote to raise tuition fee's, they should stay the same.
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    (Original post by BADBOY89)
    Well if u come out of a celebrity family or of an upper-middle class family with high incomes, it is good for you.

    What about the poorer families? They won't be able to send their children to uni, just because some bunch of dirty coalitioners decided to spend less on education than before which therefore leads to cuts in this sector.

    I am on a tight budget and with this stagnation, I can hardly find a job in the UK as I am a foreign student. And I wana go for an MA after finishing my BA. And I need a job and need one quickly.
    How does it make it harder from students from poorer backgrounds? If anything it is far easier, they get 1 or even 2 years free. They only pay back when they are earning above 21k a year. I fail to see how any of this is bad? Can you actually explain why it is bad for poorer families without just saying 9k a year. As lets face it, that is why their are things called loan which aren't repayable util you have a job
 
 
 
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