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Post deficit will the fees be reduced back down? Watch

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    Has there been any suggestion that fees for university will go back down to £3000 per year when the deficit has been paid off? It perplexes me that such a permanent solution has been made for such a temporary problem. There is no doubt that the cuts in defence, schools etc. will probably all be reversed at some point in the future.

    On a side note, if the prices won't drop after the deficit has been reduced will the government be reducing the progressiveness of our taxation system? After all if they aren't helping anyone get their degrees, how can they profit from them when they earn more money? Afterall, in the post deficit period we are all going to have to pay for our children to be schooled privately, and for their university if they are to have any hope at all.
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    do you mean when the deficit has been paid off, or when the debt has been paid off? i assume you know the difference
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    I'll be in my rocking chair before this country's debt is paid off. Makes no difference to me.
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    they could do, but judging by the coalition's other economic policy reforms, i'd say they're maybe some structural changes to the economy (the "big society", welfare reforms), rather than just superficially trying to reduce national debt

    so i guess it depends on which party comes into power
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    No, of course not.

    They will instead make taxation more fair by decreasing the progression and ensuring that all people pay a similar portion of their income. (Which in practice means lowering the tax rate for the rich). This means that the deficit will not turn into a surplus and thus, government spending cannot be increased.
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    The causes of the deficit weren't "temporary" problems, they were long term problems that were able to be put off by previous governments while times were apparently good. The current recession has just brought forward the need to pass reforms of this type through and should benefit the country in the long run, though make the implementers of the policies unpopular.
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    Massive structural changes have been made with the removal of teaching grants for most subjects - this is more significant than the fees rise (although they are both linked). So no - I think the fundamentals of British higher education has changed - the only way forward I see is the privatisation of more subjects - whaddya reckons next civil enginnering? dentistry?
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    They won't ever be reduced.
 
 
 
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